1,637 results for Conference item, 2000

  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Developing and introducing courses on testing and quality assurance

    Joyce, D.; Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reviews the processes involved in developing level 6 and 7 courses on testing and quality assurance. These processes include having the initial idea, conducting market research, deciding to proceed, forming a development team, gathering data, deciding levels and prerequisites, identifying resources, obtaining approvals, and marketing to students. The paper also reflects on the learnings gained from the experience of delivering the level 6 course for the first time.

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  • Attracting students to computing: The collaborative development of an innovative marketing tool

    Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years students enrolling in computing courses or choosing computing as a major have been declining. (McCallum, 2006, Chabrow, 2004) Review of the literature tells us that one of the reasons for this decline is the “image of computing” as a viable career option. To help eliminate this myth a project was established under the Accelerating Auckland Task Force TEC funding to create a DVD for high school students to show how exciting a career in computing can be. Six Auckland tertiary institutions collaborated to design and produce a DVD outlining eight different careers in the field of computing. This paper outlines the background to the declining enrolments, the collaboration of the six tertiary providers and the production and development of the DVD. Free copies of the DVD will be available at the presentation.

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  • Estimation of Cronbach’s alpha for sparse datasets

    Lopez, M. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Cronbach’s alpha is widely used to evaluate the internal consistency of a psychometric instrument. Its popularity is largely based on a straightforward interpretation in terms of correlations, its ease of calculation and the guidance it gives to building a single dimensional scale. The standard calculation of alpha, however, requires a complete dataset and can give misleading results with sparse datasets. An alternative method of calculating an equivalent to Cronbach’s alpha is proposed that retains the essence of alpha and can be readily calculated for sparse datasets. A theoretical basis is given and the method is evaluated and validated against generated datasets.

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  • The use of a commercial ERP system: Teaching business systems computing students

    Comins, N.; Young, A. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the use of a commercial Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system in an undergraduate degree course. It will describe the process of deciding on which system to use, the implementation of several different ERP systems and the integration of the system into the curriculum of the course. The paper will also discuss the different pedagogical uses of the system, the different ways in which such a system can be implemented and the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems that were implemented. The paper will conclude with lecturer and student feedback on the process and application of employing such a large system into the course to enhance the teaching and learning of a business information system to computing students..

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  • A standards-based approach to federated identity

    Lopez, M.; Mann, S.; Peppiatt, J.; Sewell, A.; Stott, C. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Federated Identity allows users to access multiple services at different organisations with the same credentials. In this paper, we summarise key work currently being carried out on Federated Identity. We evaluate several existing and suggested schemes and propose a new standards-based platform-neutral design pattern that uses current mature technologies and is suitable for the implementation of federated identity in a business-tobusiness context. The design pattern is verified with a practical implementation at two polytechnics.

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  • An exploratory study into the impact of NACCQ research

    Clear, T.; Young, A. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary investigation into the impact of research within the New Zealand National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) sector. Using a strategy based predominantly upon keyword search of academic reference databases, the study found that NACCQ projects and publications are beginning to be cited in diverse outlets, and are now making a contribution to the international literature in the computing disciplines. The study and its findings are briefly reviewed and the outlets in which NACCQ research has been cited are tabulated. This paper establishes the first profile of international citations for NACCQ research and provides a replicable baseline for subsequent studies into the impact of research originating in the sector.

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  • The Carich Affair: Picking up the "pieces" (students) and moving on

    McCarthy, C.; Roberton, G.; Jull, C.; Potgieter, C. (2004)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In recent years Private Training Enterprises (PTEs) started teaching diploma programmes at levels 5 and 6 in full competition with Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITP). ITPs became increasingly concerned about the ability of PTE students to pathway into higher level ITP programmes, so as to continue with their studies. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) had done considerable work to map the unit standards contained in the national diplomas to their qualifications and this exercise drew into question the perceived value of the PTE levels 5 and 6 diplomas from the perspective of ITPs (Ross & Roberton, 2003). In the event, these concerns became less relevant when a major player in the PTE domain collapsed. In October 2003 Carich were forced to close business down and suddenly the future of their students, including a major cohort from the international market, was in serious jeopardy. The New Zealand government requested higher education institutions to rescue students, recognizing the negative impact that the collapse of Carich would have on students. They also coordinated the re-assignment of students to institutions who volunteered to help. This paper is written as an opinion piece to explain how Wintec and CPIT handled the situation, which occurred at an extremely busy time of the year for ITPs. It discusses the associated problems, the benefits that accrued as a result of the successful rescue operation, and lessons learned from the experience.

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  • E-learning: Current trends, practices and issues for future consideration

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As public interest in the Internet continues to grow, there is an increasing pressure on educators to incorporate Internet resources into traditional classroom programs in new and creative ways. Some institutions have introduced Web-assisted options as a supplement to face-to-face communication between students and educators/trainers, whilst others offer Web-based learning with the Internet as the sole medium for delivery. To date, there has been some debate with regards to the perceived effectiveness of these Web-assisted options (from the point of view of both teaching staff and students). This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the students’ attitudes towards webassisted learning (within the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology - CPIT).

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  • Computer modelling and simulation as a learning tool - A preliminary study of network simulation products

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, computer simulation plays a significant role in the process of decisionmaking and planning. Furthermore, it can act as an effective tool for learning, teaching and training. Educating and training learners in the field of communications and Web enabling technologies can be a costly exercise – as theory often needs to be supported by handson practice in workshops or labs. In this case, computer simulation products can often prove to be an alternative cost-effective solution. This paper introduces a methodology for evaluating such products and discusses the results of a preliminary study of a number of options that are currently available within the marketplace.

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  • "Have-nets and have-nots" - what determines internet access in New Zealand

    Smythe, M. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Internet access and social issues: Various commentators overseas have speculated that access to the Internet is a dynamic force for social good, improving communication, education, employment, medical care, and political participation. This has come about due largely to the opportunities the Internet and other technologies seemingly represent to empower individuals. In addition there is an increasing amount of information becoming available only on the Internet. Consequently, issues of access to Information Technology and the Internet are becoming of increasing concern to policy-makers both in NZ and overseas, where terms such as “digital divide” and “information haves and have-nots” are appearing regularly in various media. At a recent Unesco conference is was stated that “Unesco could use its mandate of promoting access to information ...to define a universal right of access to the Internet with which member states would have to comply”(Pullar-Strecker, 1998).

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  • Using academic research methodologies to improve the quality of teaching: A case study

    McEwan, W. (2001)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A contract for the European Space Agency (ESA) was carried out by the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, to study the performance of the protocols (particularly TCP/IP) used within the ESA funded CODE satellite communication system (Fairhurst, Ord et al. 1993; Fairhurst, McEwan, et al. 1993; Fairhurst, et al. 1994). As part of that study, data was collected from the routers connected to the VSAT terminal equipment using the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). The analysis of data gathered from that experiment, and the later comparison of some of the methodologies used, formed part of a M.Sc. Engineering by research thesis published by the author of this paper (2000). The present paper does not particularly concern itself with the results of the above research. Rather, it is intended to illustrate that the experimental methodologies, devised for a leading academic research project undertaken at postgraduate level, can at times be later used to improve the quality of teaching and research at degree level and below. This is contrary to the common but ill-conceived notion that such academic research is overly esoteric and thus somehow unrelated and of no benefit to the more down-to-earth realities of general teaching. Within this paper some of the practical details of the methodology used in the CODE experiment will be described. This will include the hardware internetwork configurations used during both the “live” satellite data communication link (an expensive resource) and a similar configuration using a “Satellite Link Simulator (SLS)” during the majority time when the live link was unavailable. Following the model of the above research, the School of Computing at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) has recently begun work on the creation of an in-house data communications research and teaching laboratory. Although this is in its early stages of formation this presentation will show that parts of its design are derived directly from the above CODE experiments. In addition, some software simulations used in the CODE experiments will be briefly described along with our plans for using similar software simulations in student research project work.

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  • Experimenting with web-based course management applications - as a tool for sharing research information and promoting research

    Asgarkhani, M.; Weir, D. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years, there has been a major shift in the New Zealand tertiary education marketplace - more specifically, with Polytechnics offering degree programs alongside other qualifications that they have been making readily available. It is now necessary for them to be able to demonstrate that they are capable of conducting research - more specifically, in providing support, making resources and funding available and promoting a research-orientated culture. Polytechnics across New Zealand have applied various tools and techniques in order to promote and encourage research. This paper outlines the results of an experiment with Blackboard (a Web-based course management tool) as a tool for promoting research and scholarly activities.

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  • Key attributes for success within the ICT job market: a case study of ICT students' view

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on attributes that are seen as being critical to success within the ICT sector roles. The required attributes as identified by a study of 205 randomly selected ICT roles have been compared with students’ perception (based on the preliminary results of a study of one student focus group). Overall, there were difficulties in drawing clear conclusions from the outcome of one case study only. However, we were able to identify some key issues in both agreements and mismatches on winning attributes for future studies.

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  • Belbin team roles, organisational patterns and eLearning: a case study

    Gibson, A.; Nesbit, T. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2004 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) embarked on a project to develop eLearning content for a number of modules from the Certificate in Computing (CIC) that is overseen by the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The purpose of this paper is to describe the process that was used to manage the development team and the key issues that arose, how Belbin Team Roles as described in Belbin (1981) could have been applied at the inception of the project, and how the use of organisational patterns as described in Coplien and Harrison (2005) could have been applied in making decisions about how the team would function. The paper identifies how some aspects of Belbin Team Roles were extremely helpful in the managing of the team, how some organisational patterns confirm different aspects of how the team was managed, and that had other organisational patterns been applied at the start of the project some aspects of the overall project would have been improved and enhanced.

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  • 80% of what? - a preliminary investigation of tutors' understanding of the 80% pass mark for DipBC modules

    Kennedy, D.; Ross, J. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    “I don’t take an awful lot of notice of the 80% thing” Tutor comment. As new people are recruited to join the many teams of NDBC teaching staff throughout the country, “old timers” attempt to explain the concept of mastery that is supposed to form the basis of assessment procedures in the various modules. The concept is described in the NZQA approved document, commonly known as the Bluebook, which details the NDBC, and other, qualification requirements. In that document, a figure of 80% is suggested as a guideline pass mark for assessments which concern knowledge-based modules. This paper focuses on the meaning of that 80% guideline since, for many, both the explanation and the practice of assessing mastery provide a hurdle with an element of mystery. We attempt to unravel some of the mystery by examining what the current practice is in one Polytechnic and to suggest that our methods may be forcing a dumbing down of assessments which target the comprehension sections of modules. The descriptors for the diploma modules categorise the learning required for each module using the RCAP model. It seems that even with Recall sections some tutors have trouble relating the 80% to the assessment. The Application and Problem Solving areas have largely become the things we assess using assignments. This paper examines how the 80% pass mark is being applied to assignments and to the comprehension elements of various courses, for it is in these areas of cognitive processing that competency (or 80%of competency) is harder to establish particularly in areas of original, creative thought. The paper raises the question of honesty of assessment practices in terms of marking guides and suggests that we should be insisting on using both appropriate tools for generating valid evidence and appropriate means of judging student performance against a course’s learning outcomes, rather than trying to force pass marks to add up to 80%.

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  • RelaxNG with XML data structures

    Kennedy, D. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML mark-up is used in a wide range of applications and in particular for data transfer via the Internet. XML textbooks and web-based tutorials typically introduce XML mark-up by the use of examples and the rules for well-formed XML, e.g. XML Tutorial. According to this popular presentation at W3schools.com the development of a DTD or schema is done after a document instance has been marked up. An XML document is a data structure. This paper proposes a methodology for XML mark-up that begins with data analysis by using a type of structure diagram (an elm tree diagram) then describes the data structure and content using Relax NC (an easier to use alternative to DTD or XML Schema) and finally does the mark-up of document instances. The instruction effectiveness and the efficiency of the different approaches are compared for two occurrences of a 3rd year degree paper.

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  • Database design and the reality of normalisation

    Kennedy, D. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    What is normalisation all about? Why do we teach it? How do we teach it? How can we explain normalisation to our students so that they will understand it? This paper presents a method of teaching normalisation that, experience has shown, students can understand. The paper also considers the broader questions of: ¨ Why is normalisation important? ¨ Where does it fit in the process of database design? ¨ How important is it in the “real world”? Database design can be done using an entity relationship diagram (ERD) - a top down approach or by normalisation of sets of data - a bottom up approach The question is, What do real database designers do? ¨ What methodologies do they use? ¨ How important is normalisation? ¨ What normalisation rules do they use i.e. how far do they take it? ¨ How important is denormalisation? This paper presents a summary of findings, from interviews with database designers, that should help us in our teaching of Database design.

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