4,083 results for Conference item, 2010

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Creating Creatures: Dumont and the metaphysics of evil

    Jackson, ML (2012-04-21)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the late 1990s Bruno Dumont has produced six feature films, approximately one every three years. His cinema has been highly praised and is recognized by Martine Beugnet, in Cinema and Sensation, as exemplary of a new cinema that radically challenges the understanding of cinematic affect: a cinema of sensibility rather than sense. Dumont was himself a philosopher, now turned filmmaker, though this is not the particular axis or focus for this paper. Rather, what is particularly challenging in his cinema is a fundamental concern with evil, a concern that does not moralize, that does not condemn, that does not even ask for an account of or economy of evil. I want to explore this cinema that shows the human essentially as a be-coming ‘longing’, a be-longing to being as that which comes not to a particular time or a particular language, to an articulation of its existence, but rather shows a coming to temporality, to the possibility of being-in ‘time’ and to an opening to ‘language’, to the word as the becoming it-self of the existent. In this I want to engage a reading of Schelling’s Treatise on the Essence of Human Freedom, and a particularly Heideggerian reading of this treatise as a “metaphysics of evil,” wherein, for Schelling, evil in its actuality, in its existing, is necessary for human freedom.

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  • Intercomparison between VLBI frequency transfer and other techniques

    Takiguchi, H; Koyama, Y; Ichikawa, R; Gotoh, T; Ishii, A; Hobiger, T; Fujieda, M; Amagai, J; Hosokawa, M (2012-04-23)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Evaluation of the new approach to improving compact-compact antenna baseline in VLBI

    Takiguchi, H; Ishii, A; Ichikawa, R; Koyama, Y (2012-04-23)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Learning about and through teaching : Course work and practicum during initial teacher education

    Grudnoff, Lexie; Ward, Lorrae; Ritchie, Jenny; Brooker, Barry; Simpson, Mary (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on findings from the final pilot of a survey (N=811) to be used by multiple New Zealand initial teacher education providers to measure graduating teacher perceptions of how well their programmes prepared them to start teaching. The survey, commissioned by the Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand (TEFANZ), is their proactive response to the political accountability demands that are a feature of teacher education internationally, and to the need for higher education to take a lead in the accountability ‘narrative’ (Shulman, 2007). This paper focuses on the perceptions of graduating student teachers regarding the learning opportunities provided to them during their ITE programmes. It compares opportunities during course work and practicum and suggests that more attention should be given to both components to ensure that student teacher learning is maximised in teacher preparation programmes.

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  • Visual arts education: Provoking learning conversations

    Wrightson, Helen; Plows, J. (2013-04-20)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Visual arts praxis dilemmas can invoke uncertainty, calling for courage to engage in learning conversations that promote innovative ideas. These may challenge teachers but by engaging in dialogue can invite reflection and possible changes to practice. This workshop explores visual arts education and differing ideas teachers hold about children’s drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. Visual arts are a valuable mode for children to make meaning and express emotions so let’s talk and explore possibilities

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  • Culturally responsive practice as quality early childhood care and education provision.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Over the last two decades New Zealand has become one of a small number of culturally and linguistically superdiverse countries. Superdiversity indicates a level of cultural complexity surpassing anything previously experienced. Aotearoa NZ is now home to 160 languages, forecasted to deepen even further. “Learning to interpret across cultures demands reflecting on our own experiences, analyzing our own culture, examining and comparing varying perspectives. We must consciously and voluntarily make our cultural lenses apparent. Engaging in the hard work of seeing the world as others see it must be a fundamental goal for any move to reform the education of teachers and their assessment”--Lisa Delpit Culturally responsive practice - Management and practitioners to demonstrate their awareness of historical, social, cultural and political contexts, and the impacts of past and current social, educational and economic policies in relation to contemporary inequities.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Relationships of Promise

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This talk will draw upon my recent writing, and on work from our Teaching and Learning Research Initiative project Titiro Whakamuri, Hoki Whakamua: We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning. Pedagogies of care and affect, which resonate te ao Māori conceptualisations of inter-connectedness will be proposed as a source of optimism in response to the challenges that we face. One conceptual tool in response to these matters of concern is an ethic of care (Noddings 1995), applied in our recent study as the notion of ‘caring for ourselves, others and the environment’. A second conceptual tool is re-visibilisation and revalidation of Indigenous onto-epistemologies, which position humans as part of and reliant upon, rather than superior to and detached from our local and global world(s).

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  • Exploring the engagement of New Zealand diagnostic radiographers with research

    Haven, Jennifer (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research question: To what extent are New Zealand diagnostic radiographers engaged with research and why?

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  • Keep it or kill it? How the behaviour of domestic cats (Felis catus) impacts upon perceptions of their value and management methods

    Farnworth, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The domestic cat is the most commonly owned companion animal both in New Zealand and globally. Recent dialogues around the impact and value of cats have once again brought them into the spotlight and this presentation seeks to discuss these New Zealand based dialogues using a behavioural framework. Generally cats are thought to live in three broad categories: ‘Feral’, ‘Stray’ and ‘Companion’ and how a cat is attributed to these categories will depend upon its behaviour in and around human habitation. Other behavioural qualities such as predatory behaviours, which are not considered human-centred, are shared across all cats and have the potential to substantially impact upon cat treatment and welfare. Behavioural temperaments are constructed over the lifetime of an animal and, consequently, how a cat behaves and how it is labelled will be directly related to the degree of care historically provided to it. Cats in New Zealand have no enforceable ownership requirements that function to reduce their likelihood of becoming lost or abandoned. As a result they are far more likely to be abandoned that dogs. In part this may be because they are seen as being behaviourally independent and as having a need to roam. As a result of historic loss or abandonment ‘feral’ cats become behaviourally and reproductively autonomous. They are, therefore, freely and necessarily controlled through lethal means. ‘Stray’ cats are also euthanized frequently in order to manage the population, especially if they are behaviourally unable to be adopted. This presentation seeks to draw together prior research and prospective research ideas to generate a discussion around public perceptions of what a ‘cat’ is, both as a construct of their behaviour and as constructs of the New Zealand society in which they reside. A better understanding of cat behaviour could lead to improved management, reduced abandonment and therefore a decline in our need to kill cats.

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  • To close your eyes will not ease another’s pain - Investigating behavioural indicators of pain in cats

    Waran, Nat; Farnworth, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Animals being non-verbal, express their experience of painful conditions and procedures through their behaviour. In humans, pain is what the patient says it is, and we know that the subjective experience varies from individual to individual, and doesn’t necessarily relate to the size or seriousness of the wound or illness. In animals, pain is what we say it is and it is recognized that traditionally pain management for cats has been described as seriously under-provisioned, with a number of studies demonstrating that cats appear to be under treated for pain as compared with how dogs are managed for similar procedures. Overall it is postulated that under-provision of analgesia arose because of the difficulties in detecting pain behaviour in cats, from perceptions about the unique physiology of the cat and an associated lack of approved analgesics such as NSAID for use in cats as well as a general caution amongst veterinary practitioners when using certain drug types (such as opioids). Because good pain management relies on good recognition of pain, it is essential that research to identify reliable indicators of a painful experience be carried out and the results properly disseminated and used in practice. There is an old Chinese proverb that says ‘to close your eyes will not ease another’s pain’, something that we must be conscious of when dealing with animals, such as cats who can only express their pain in less overt and subtle ways.

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  • A stroke of luck: The win-win of a clinical research partnership

    Roy, Dianne (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Stroke in New Zealand ; The stroke of luck (Research for Health Professionals) ; The Stroke Family Whanau Project ; The win-wins.

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  • Does activity theory help our understanding of teamwork, leadership and interprofessional collaboration?

    McKimm, J.; Barrow, M.; Gasquoine, Susan; Rowe, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Background and purpose The literature identifies the lack of a conceptual underpinning to interprofessional education and collaborative practice, linking this to the failure of many initiatives to improve such practice. Many reported educational initiatives, typically in uni-professional contexts, relate to teaching non-technical skills (teamwork, leadership and communication) where the inability of professionals to work together is manifested in practice. We report on an ongoing research study in New Zealand which aims to enhance our understanding of the complexities of professional, collaborative practice by identifying the perceptions and experiences of doctors and numes at different stages of their professional career about teamworking, collaborative practice, working interprofessionally, leadership and followership. Methodology In stage one of the study, we interviewed and carried out a questionnaire survey of newly graduated doctors and nurses working in secondary care, exploring their perceptions and understandings of leadership and teamworking. In stage two, 40 face-to-face, individual, semi- structured interviews were carried out in 2011-12 with senior doctors and nurses working in two clinical settings in a large urban hospital. Data generated were analysed with a framework developed using activity theory enhance understanding of interprofessional teamworking. Results Health professionals work in multiple teams with competing needs and conflicting values. Loyalty to the professional team often overrides other considerations leading to dysfunction and sabotage. Patient advocacy is used to challenge other professionals and enable collaborative practice. Contemporary teaching of 'teamwork' or 'communication’ in uni-professional training may enhance understanding but is unlikely to improve interprofessional 'collaboration’ in practice', as it fails to address how health professionals actually work in contemporary health services. An activity theory based framework is used to consider how the context of care might affect clinicians' conceptualisation of collaboration with other professionals, members of their own profession (intra-professional working) and members of other professions (inter- professional working). The nature and interviewees' perceptions of 'collaboration' in different specialties is also explored. To achieve improved patient care, we discuss how different pre- qualifying education and ongoing professional development is needed to help health professionals achieve greater understanding of the complexity of interprofessional teamworking and the loci of power, control, and authority. Such development requires changing ways of thinking about identity formation, how different professionals perceive healthcare, the influence of the specialty and the location of professionals' healthcare work.

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  • Nurturing Collaboration:Conservation Outcomes for Kea

    Roberts, Lorne; Orr-Walker, Tamsin; Adams, Nigel; Kemp, Joshua R. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Abstract: In 2009, the first in-situ kea population survey trials began under the coordination of the Kea Conservation Trust in partnership with Department of Conservation (DOC). Early census results from Nelson Lakes showed that kea density had declined significantly since a previous census a decade earlier. To ensure that mountain-top counts were coinciding with fledging times (the optimal life stage for survey work), a parallel project, Nest Monitoring, was developed. Motion sensor cameras and radio trackers were thus purchased and deployed during the next breeding season. The radio tags and cameras provided critical information on pest visitation to kea nests, confirmation of the breeding status of individual adults, fledging times, and nest survival. Three further years of nest data collection ensued on the back of this success. But how did this get off the ground? For a ‘fledgling’ conservation trust to finance and coordinate such a project, suitable collaborators had to be found and engaged. Private business backing was used as seed funding to secure larger Lotteries Grants. Additional corporate sponsorship supported successful grant applications to zoos, zoo organizations and other interested agencies. In-kind support by DOC and a huge number of volunteer man-hours have further contributed to this extremely successful collaborative project which is now in its fifth year. This paper looks at who came on board and why, and how this collaborative effort has resulted in positive conservation outcomes for one of New Zealand’s iconic species.

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  • Fighting Back: Education Initiatives in the Teaching of Architecture.

    Murphy, Chris; Smith, Brendan (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This research presentation will examine the effectiveness of two educational initiatives carried out in Semester 1 2013 within the Unitec Department of Architecture. 1. Embedding the librarian in the Design Communication teaching course: The Department of Architecture, like most other tertiary courses, faces challenges in the transitioning of students from the secondary to the tertiary learning environment. Many students skilled in the design focused courses do not always exhibit strengths in written communication to the standard required for degree level. This lack of confidence becomes particularly apparent when students are required to deal with . research issues that require active engagement with the library In 2013, with the support of the Faculty Librarian, it was decided to embed a resident librarian within the team unit teaching Design Communication. The course taught written and oral communication skills to all first year students. The librarian was present each week and was an active support person within the course. The feedback from the course was very positive. What was particularly satisfying, however, was the noted uptake by library staff of first year students in their use of the library space and facilities, compared to first year student use in previous years. 2. Digital Devices as a communication and feedback tool: A significant increase in student numbers in 2012 led to communication issues within the course Design Studio 1. In 2013 it was decided to re-configure the streams, place more emphasis on group led teaching, and to deliver regular feedback to students via social media using digital devices. The initiative was a shared one with Unitec's Te Puna Ako, who supplied and supported staff in their use of the electronic devices. This research presentation will discuss the effectiveness of these two initiatives

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  • New Zealand and capital gains tax: A tax experts' perspective

    Cheng, Alvin; Yong, Sue (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    New Zealand is an interesting country to study capital gains tax (CGT) as it is one of the few OECD countries at present that does not have a formalised capital gains tax. Despite international and political pressures to have a CGT over the last ten years, these attempts to introduce CGT were unsuccessful. The complexity of the tax and a strong public resistance regarding introducing a new and additional tax were the main reasons for not having a comprehensive CGT. Of late, the recommendations from the 2009 Tax Working Group and the 2013 OECD Committee had resurrected the debate to introduce CGT from the Labour and Green parties. The aim of this research is to examine the views of the tax experts’ regarding introducing CGT to New Zealand. The findings showed that tax experts overall did not support CGT for various reasons. They include incurring higher tax compliance costs; difficulty in interpretation the CGT legislation; and self-interest. The current tax regime requires tax experts’ advice in converting taxable incomes to capital gains in order to minimise taxes for their clients. The self interest factor has not been examined in prior studies and this study aims to address this gap.

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  • Is a Capital Gains Tax the Answer to New Zealand's Tax Alchemy?

    Cassidy, Julie; Cheng, Alvin; Yong, Sue (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Unlike most OECD countries, including the United Kingdom and Australia, New Zealand has never implemented a realisation based capital gains tax (‘CGT’). Coupled with the fact that the New Zealand judiciary has steadfastly maintained the income/capital dichotomy, this has extended to certain taxpayers, most notably wealthier New Zealanders, the tax equivalent of alchemy. By making tax free capital gains from capital investments, such persons have truly struck gold! On 14 July 2011 the New Zealand Labour Party released its key tax policies for the then upcoming 2011 election. One of these policies included broadening the New Zealand tax base by introducing a CGT. Post the election, the Labour Party announced on 15 March 2012 that it will retain its plans for a CGT. The background to these announcements are the findings of a number of New Zealand Review Committees which have considered whether the New Zealand tax base should be so broadened by introducing a CGT. The McLeod Review 2001 Issues paper, for example, noted that CGT regimes “tend to be some of the most complex areas of tax law.” The Issues paper raised a number of design issues that lend to the complexity of a CGT, including: • identifying what constitutes an asset, noting that intangible property is particularly problematic; and • determining which methods of transferring full or partial economic ownership of an asset is a ‘realisation event’. Equally problematic is the identification of the acquisition of an asset. This paper looks at these three design features through a comparative analysis of the CGT regimes in the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa. It concludes that there are many lessons New Zealand can learn from the CGT experiences of these three Nations.

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  • The Effects of Investor Sentiment and the Conditional Volatility in New Zealand Stock Market

    Buranavityawut, Nonthipoth (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Using New Zealand market data, this paper provides additional evidence to support recent studies that investor sentiment moves stock prices and, in turn, influences expected returns. It also adds to a number of previous studies that investor sentiment influences the market volatility, and hence the mean-variance relation. The findings in this study help confirm that investor sentiment is time-varying.

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  • The open

    Austin, Michael (2013-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in Karl Popper’s The Open Society, written during the Second World War in Christchurch. Popper also wrote another major book The Poverty of Historicism, which has been much debated. The history of architecture revolves around the notion of closure. It is concerned with shelter, protection and differentiation. A history of openness in architecture has yet to be written. It does not see origins in the forest or the primitive hut but instead in the ocean and the boat. Open architecture is not concerned with closed rooms courtyards or squares. It is instead about platforms, decks, terraces, and beaches. However in the period of global expansion, the extent of oceanic and continental geography provoked confrontation with the phenomenon of the open. Hodges, the artist on Cook’s first voyage, continued to be confounded by the aesthetic appeal of Pacific and Asian architecture which couldn't be explained by reference to the architectural canon of ancient Greece. Oceanic societies lived in a way that contradicted traditional European architecture. In the extreme case aboriginal architecture was seen as non-existent. This architecture of the new world introduced the notion of the open and provoked the introduction of the modern. The skyscraper, the suburb, the freeway are new world examples of open architecture. The negatives of openness are well known; the boredom of suburbs the waste of the freeway and the banality of the skyscraper city. However the outcomes are sometimes sublime. The architecture of openness endlessly strives for porosity, connection, or view, rather than enclosure, shelter, or containment. The positive story to be written is about the achievement of openness.

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  • Growing the Business Practitioner: The nature and purpose of legal studies for the non lawyer

    Ayling, Diana; Finlayson, Patricia (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Lyman Johnson explained the tenuous relationship between business people and the law in his paper, Corporate Law Teachers as Gatekeepers (2009). He draws upon the work of Milton Friedman explaining that ‘executives must also conform not only to the law but also to rules “embodied in ethical custom”’. Recent global corporate collapse has demonstrated that while many business practitioners complied with the law, they did not embody the ethical custom of their time. The Global Financial Crisis (GFC) has caused business people, governments and educators to consider the nature of business education and how is serves the wider community. Of particular focus is the nature and extent of ethical education in our business schools. This paper explores the current nature of business education and suggests that future graduate profiles should include statements which reflect the specific behavioural requirements of graduates’ workplaces. Students should be provided with the opportunity to experience and explore values in team learning situations, work integrated learning and significant projects. Teachers are challenged to create assessments which will measure student learning achievement and success in a broader business perspective. This will require a change in curriculum design to incorporate affective behaviours in business practice and embody an ethical framework reflecting society’s growing expectations of a socially responsible business community.

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