71 results for Conference item, ResearchCommons@Waikato, 2010

  • Can the goldfish see the water? A critical analysis of ‘good intentions’ in cross-cultural practice

    Ferguson, Bruce; Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We claim to hold values that our students are responsible and autonomous adults whose success in our courses is best facilitated by our understanding of and respect for their specific backgrounds. We wish to be judged on these values by feedback provided by our students and those with whom we work. However, how well, if ever, are we able to ‘see the water,’ the cultural conditioning that leads us to act in ways that seem supportive of our students to us, but may be perceived differently by them? In this paper, we present conflicting evidence around perceptions of our practice. We discuss where things have gone well, and where interventions have possibly been traumatic for the recipients. We question whether, and how, our practice cross-culturally can be safe. We challenge ourselves and others to think carefully about our responsibilities to our students, whether our privileged positioning obliges us to share and if so, how that sharing can occur in ways that validate and equally respect the values of those with whom we work.

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  • The importance of heterogeneity when examining immigrant education-occupation mismatch: evidence from New Zealand

    Poot, Jacques; Stillman, Steven (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Many immigrants are overqualified in their first job after arrival in the host country. Education-occupation mismatch can affect the economic integration of immigrants and the returns to education and experience. The extent of this problem has been measured in recent years by means of micro level data in Australia, North America and Europe. However, these papers have typically ignored the importance of allowing for heterogeneity, in particular by qualification level and years in the destination country. In this paper, we use data from the 1996, 2001 and 2006 New Zealand censuses to examine differences between each migrant’s actual years of education and the estimated typical years of education in the narrowly defined occupation in which they work. We find that migrants living in New Zealand for less than 5 years are on average overeducated, while earlier migrants are on average undereducated. However, once accounting for heterogeneity, we find that both overeducated and undereducated migrants become, with increasing years of residence in New Zealand, more similar to comparable native born. Convergence from overeducation is stronger than from undereducation.

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  • The spatial impact of local infrastructural investment in New Zealand

    Cochrane, William; Grimes, Arthur; McCann, Philip; Poot, Jacques (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we estimate the impact of local authority infrastructure spending in New Zealand using spatial econometric modeling, with the infrastructure spending itself endogenously determined. Utilizing data from the New Zealand Census and Local Authorities Finance data (1991-2008), aggregated to functional labor market areas, we formulate a simultaneous equations growth model of real income, population, land rent and public infrastructure investment. Estimation is conducted using a spatial 3SLS procedure. We find that an increase in local infrastructure spending increases population growth, real income and land values, but is itself endogenous and spatially correlated.

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  • Immigration and innovation in European regions

    Poot, Jacques; Ozgen, Ceren; Nijkamp, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The pooling of people with diverse backgrounds in particular areas may boost the creation of new ideas, knowledge spillovers, entrepreneurship and economic growth. In this paper we measure the impact of the size, skills and diversity of immigration on innovativeness of host regions. For this purpose we construct a panel of data on 170 regions in Europe (NUTS 2 level) for the period 1991-2001. Innovation outcomes are measured by means of the number and types of patent applications. Given the geographical concentration and subsequent diffusion of innovation activity, and the spatial selectivity of immigrant settlement patterns, we take account of spatial dependence and of endogeneity of immigrant settlement in the econometric modelling. We find that an increase in patent applications in a region is associated with (i) net immigration; (ii) the share of foreigners in the population of the region; (iii) the average skill level of the immigrants; and (iv) the cultural diversity of the immigrants. The magnitude of these effects varies between types of patents.

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  • The one-many problem – one problem or many? Some insights from Plato’s Philebus.

    Legg, Catherine; Gibbons, Stephanie (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We discuss the one-many problem as it appears in the Philebus and find that it is not restricted to a problem about the relation between universals and the particulars that instantiate them (the “Hylomorphic One-Many Problem”). In fact some of the most interesting aspects of the problem occur purely in the realm of Forms. We discuss a solution to the One-Many problem offered in the dialogue in terms of the concepts of ‘limit’ and ‘the unlimited’.

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  • Performance of a building integrated solar combisystem

    Anderson, Timothy Nicholas; Duke, Mike; Carson, James K. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Solar combisystems providing both water and space heating to buildings are becoming commonplace in European and North American locations. However, the use of these systems in Australia and New Zealand is still in its infancy. While significant work has been undertaken to characterise the performance of these systems in northern hemisphere locations, this does not necessarily reflect their performance in Australia or New Zealand. This work examines the performance of solar combisystems utilising TRNSYS and F-chart simulations of an integrated solar thermal combisystem installed in a single storey detached dwelling under typical Australian and New Zealand climatic conditions. In doing this, it shows that there is significant scope for increased use of solar combisystems in the cooler climate regions of Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Pattern and process of vegetation change (succession) in recent volcanic landscapes of New Zealand and Hawaii

    Clarkson, Bruce D.; Clarkson, Beverley R. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Volcanic activity (including lava flows, debris flows and tephra eruptions) is a regular feature of many landscapes of the North Island of New Zealand and the Hawaiian archipelago. Over the last 35 years, we have been using a combination of the chronosequence and direct monitoring methodologies (Clarkson 1998; Walker et al. 2010) to research the pattern and process of vegetation change (succession) in these landscapes. The following account summarizes pattern and process from our main study sites: Whakaari (White Island), Rangitoto Island, Mt Tarawera, Mt Ngauruhoe, Mt Ruapehu, and Mt Taranaki in New Zealand and Mauna Loa in Hawaii. The main focus of this account is forest development following significant eruptions.

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  • Talented and living on the wrong side of the tracks

    Ballam, Nadine Dawn (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Gifted young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds are underrepresented in gifted and talented programs in New Zealand schools (Ministry of Education, 2000) and in recent years this has been highlighted as an area of concern. The aim of this paper is to indicate the extent to which giftedness and financially challenging circumstances influence the identities of young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds. This study investigates the lived experiences of 93 survey participants and eight interviewees aged between 17 and 27 years, who grew up in financially challenging situations in New Zealand. The research indicates that socioeconomic adversity can actually contribute significantly to adaptive outcomes for gifted young people from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. Moreover, socioeconomic adversity is intrinsically valuable in relation to aspects of identity. This study also suggests that the limitations of giftedness can have more detrimental effects on an individual’s sense of identity than limitations associated with their socioeconomic circumstances.

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  • An analytical model for the break-even credit default swap spread with o counterparty default risk in Hall(2009): A pedagogical approach.

    Choi, Daniel F.S. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Professor Hull in his textbook [Hull, J. C. Options, Futures, & Other Derivatives, Edition 7, Pearson, 2009] illustrates the determination of the credit default swap (CDS) spread by a numerical example. This paper follows the assumptions used by Professor Hull and provides a reduced form formula for the CDS spread. The CDS spread can be simplified by the Taylor series into a function of two variables, the default probability and the recovery rate. Rearranging this simplified formula, the default probability, expressed as the ratio of the CDS spread and the loss given default, is equivalent to the average default intensity, or, the hazard rate defined in Hull [2009, p.500].

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  • Tōku tūrangawaewae: Culture, identity, and belonging for Māori homeless people

    Groot, Shiloh Ann Maree; Hodgetts, Darrin; Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Rua, Mohi (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    To be Māori is to have a tūrangawaewae (a place of strength and belonging, a place to stand). If so, is it conceivable that Māori are homeless in our own homeland? This presentation focuses on the experiences of two Māori homeless people who took part in a 3-year research project conducted in partnership with not-for-profit service agencies. Previous research into street homelessness has all but ignored indigenous histories, circumstances and worldviews. The situation in which indigenous people find themselves requires us to rethink how we understand homelessness and the development of culturally based roles and identities on the street and beyond.

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  • Proof of concept of diffuse optical tomography using time-of-flight range imaging cameras

    Hassan, Ahmad; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Payne, Andrew D. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Diffuse optical tomography is an optical technique to create 3-dimensional images of the inside of highly scattering material. Research groups around the world have been developing imaging systems using various source-detector arrangements to determine optical properties of biological tissue with a focus on medical applications. In this paper we investigate whether a range imaging camera can be used as a detector array. We used time-of-flight range imaging cameras instead of the conventional source-detector array used by others. The results provided in this paper show reconstructed images of absorption and reduced scattering of an object submerged in a tissue simulating phantom. Using the ranging camera XZ422 Demonstrator and the NIRFAST software package, we reconstructed 2D images of a 6 mm metal rod submerged in the centre of a 5 cm deep tank filled with 1% IntralipidTM. We have shown for the first time that range imaging cameras can replace the traditional detectors in diffuse optical tomography.

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  • Volume measurement using 3D Range Imaging

    Shrivastava, Vipul; Cree, Michael J.; Dorrington, Adrian A. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The use of 3D Range Imaging has widespread applications. One of its applications provides us the information about the volumes of different objects. In this paper, 3D range imaging has been utilised to find out the volumes of different objects using two algorithms that are based on a straightforward means to calculate volume. The algorithms implemented succesfully calculate volume on objects provided that the objects have uniform colour. Objects that have multi-coloured and glossy surfaces provided particular difficulties in determining volume.

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  • Threshold concepts and introductory electronics

    Scott, Jonathan B.; Harlow, Ann; Peter, Mira; Cowie, Bronwen (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Electronics and circuit theory are acknowledged as troublesome subjects when first introduced to students. This leads to low student retention into later electronics courses, especially in universities that offer a common first year where students are free to change streams after the first year. We report on a detailed study of the application of Threshold Concept Theory to an introductory electronics course. We identify some Threshold Concepts, explicit and tacit. We postulate that a high density of Threshold Concepts accounts for the reputation for troublesome learning in, and low retention following, these courses. We further suggest that the bimodal distribution of marks that is commonly observed in electronics teaching is a hallmark of a Thresold Concept. This may have significant impact on assessment.

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  • Electronics: A potted history and a glimpse of the future

    Scott, Jonathan B. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Keynote Speech. New Zealand has a thriving electronics industry with a long history. The renowned Kiwi ingenuity fits in well with the creative, understanding-based aspects of electronics, a discipline that is both an art and a science. However, the face of electronics is changing with the passing decades.

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  • Pukekohe silt loam, Pukekohe Hill

    Lowe, David J. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Pukekohe Hill is an excellent starting point for the tour in various ways: it provides a commanding view of important market gardens developed within Ultisols, and associated landuse issues, and the Massey Memorial on the hilltop commemorates Irish-born, South Auckland identity William (‘Big Bill’) Fergusson Massey (1865-1925), Prime Minister of New Zealand 1912-1925, after whom Massey University is named. Pukekohe town has a population of about 23,000.

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  • Analysis of ICP variants for the registration of partially overlapping time-of-flight range images

    Larkins, Robert L.; Cree, Michael J.; Dorrington, Adrian A. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is one of the most commonly used methods for registering partially overlapping range images. Nevertheless, this algorithm was not originally designed for this task, and many variants have been proposed in an effort to improve its prociency. The relatively new full-field amplitude-modulated time-of-flight range imaging cameras present further complications to registration in the form of measurement errors due to mixed and scattered light. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the most common ICP variants applied to range image data acquired from full-field range imaging cameras. The original ICP algorithm combined with boundary rejection performed the same as or better than the majority of variants tested. In fact, many of these variants proved to decrease the registration alignment.

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  • Kaupapa Māori and a new curriculum in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Chalmers, Lex; Greensill, Angeline Ngahina (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    While geographical education is our focus in this paper, the broader colonial history of education is the backdrop against which we first view the principles of Māori geographies in education. The essay underscores the importance of ‘authenticity’, the participation of local communities and local studies connected to local environments and histories. We use an educational program of the Raglan Area School on Whaingaroa Harbour as an illustrative example. The geographies of Whaingaroa Harbour provide an exemplary context for programs in geographical education and we suggest that the new curriculum in both English and Te Reo Māori (Māori language) can enhance the movement towards bi-cultural education in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Our argument is that the 2007 curriculum creates the opportunity; the impediments lie in providing appropriate resources and developing community support for the delivery of the bicultural educational approaches. is an important issue in debates about educational policy and implementing a new curriculum in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This paper explores how the development of the 2007 curriculum in Aotearoa/New Zealand attempted to address curriculum, teaching and learning options for Māori. Māori are a significant national community with needs and aspirations in education. Māori have tangata whenua status in Aotearoa/New Zealand, where this term acknowledges the arrival and settlement of migrant people of the Pacific centuries prior to significant European colonization in the 19th Century. While progress has been made in Māori education since the significant Treaty of Waitangi Act in 1975, we wish to explore the potential of Kaupapa Māori (Māori practice) in the development of a new curriculum, Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

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  • Māori, Tongan and Chinese households: Medications and elder care

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Hodgetts, Darrin; Carlson, Teah; Tongi, Lolohea; Wen Li, Wendy (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Research reveals that medicines are frequently not taken as intended, stockpiled for future use, discontinued when symptoms fade or passed to others. Medications are material objects with therapeutic uses that enter into and take on meaning within people’s lives. In this way they are culturally embedded phenomena that carry meanings and shape social relationships and practices. The symbolic meanings given to medications and cultural relations are important for understanding variations in medication practices. Households with elders often contain more medications and have more complex age-related medical conditions. In households where members are engaged in the reciprocation of care among two or three generations, medications within and between these relationships take on a range of dynamic meanings. In this paper, we explore how interactions between household members affect medicines-taking practices of elders and their families from three cultural groups: Māori, Tongan and Chinese. This research was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand and the Marsden Fund of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

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  • Analyzing users’ behaviour to identify their privacy concerns

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Masoodian, Masood (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The majority of studies examining privacy concerns of Internet users are based on surveys. Many problems have, however, been identified with using surveys to measure people’s privacy concerns. Based on our experience from our previous studies, in this paper we discuss how ethnographic interviews and observation techniques could be used to analyze users’ behaviour in terms of how they share personal information and multimedia content with others, and utilize this to identify issues related to their privacy concerns more comprehensively than it is otherwise possible with conventional surveys.

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  • Advocates for teaching: Reconceptualising the practice of teaching development in a university

    Spiller, Dorothy; Bruce Ferguson, Pip; Pratapsingh, Preetha; Lochan, Shant; Harris, Trudy (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Teaching development units have been provided at most Australasian and British universities over the last thirty years. Typically, units have provided workshops, courses and individual consultations in a variety of formats. These units have always attracted enthusiasts, but have often struggled to bring about a fundamental shift in organisational thinking about teaching. At the same time, external pressures such as Performance Based Research Funding (PBRF) draw academics away from teaching concerns and create additional challenges for staff developers.

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