10 results for Conference item, Shared Repository, 2009

  • Research that works: a practical approach to student collaborative work

    Clark, Jill (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The authors of this paper, who tutor at two different technical institutes, have collaborated for the past four years on a research project examining New Zealand experiences with student collaborative learning in multicultural groups. International research, while acknowledging the challenges involved, is positive about the educational benefits of working in diverse groups. There has been little New Zealand research, however, in this area. The first stage of this project identified issues that tertiary tutors faced when using collaborative learning in their classrooms. Subsequent findings of this research project have been consistent with the literature on the benefits and challenges of inter-cultural collaborative learning. The results indicate that students are often inadequately prepared for working in groups and therefore do not achieve the desired outcome of learning to work together constructively and collaboratively. The development of the 'soft skills' required by industry is often not achieved by either domestic or international students. This paper outlines the particular challenges faced by New Zealand tertiary tutors who wish to use collaborative learning techniques for assessment purposes. The findings from this and other research projects have been used to construct a model that will help tutors set up collaborative programmes that not only meet the basic requirements of effective collaborative learning but are also pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. Such programmes will benefit tutors as well as domestic and international students.

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  • Is the economic crisis here worse than the US?

    Thomas, Rosita (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is an attempt to find out what impact an 'Economic Crisis' would have on New Zealand. The discussion would be centred on the various businesses in New Zealand, keeping the downturn in the finance sector as a focal point. As employees in educational institutions, would we be affected? It would be worthwhile to see what changes could occur if a crisis does occur in New Zealand

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  • Facilitating independent learning amongst Chinese international Students

    Warring, Susan (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is the first part of a longitudinal study focussing on facilitating independent learning amongst Chinese International students completing the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies at Whitireia Polytechnic. The major rationale advanced for developing independence is that this an important graduate competency required by Western employers. Evidence from the literature indicates that new Chinese international students will initially have a low level of willingness and ability to practise independent learning.

    A model of independence is developed based on the Staged Self-Directed Learning model (Grow, 1991) and on the Situational Model of Leadership (Hersey & Blanchard, cited in Hersey & Blanchard, 1996). Grow's model characterises four learning levels ranging from dependent to self-directed and it is proposed that, if suitable teaching strategies are employed, students should progress towards higher levels of independence as they advance through the degree.

    Confirming the evidence from the literature review, the findings indicate that the class is at level two of independence. Suitable teaching strategies for level two learners will be developed and implemented in parts two and three of this project.

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  • 'Opening our eyes-shifting our thinking'

    Scott, Wendy (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The purpose of the research was an evaluation of practice exemplars as a reflective process in teaching and learning about cultural safety. Six Maori, two Pacific and five Pakeha students, ranging in age from 30 to 40, took part in the research. The research findings revealed five sub themes: personal safety, power/ powerlessness, reflection, teaching and learning and cultural safety. The presentation, while acknowledging that cultural safety shared some commonalities with culture care theory, highlighted differences between the two. These included that cultural safety was explicit in identifying the inherent power of the nurse in health care relationships; related to the experience of the recipient of nursing care, and extended beyond cultural awareness and sensitivity; provided consumers of nursing services with the power to comment on practices; and contributed to the achievement of positive outcomes and experiences for them. It outlined the characteristics of a culturally safe nurse as a nurse who had undertaken a process of reflection on her/his own cultural identity and who recognised the impact their personal culture had on client care.

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  • Experiential learning in the multicultural classroom as applied to a Market Research class

    Klose, Markus (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Society's expectation of tertiary education providers, and especially polytechnics, is that they will "produce" skilled, workforce-ready graduates. Tertiary teachers are expected not only to provide students with relevant knowledge of an academic discipline, but also to develop employability skills in students .This paper discusses the author's experience in using an experiential learning strategy for a second-year degree paper in the field of Market Research to a multicultural group of student from Asian backgrounds. The author's aim is to provide students with a learning environment, where they can acquire discipline knowledge and skills which are relevant for their future employment. This paper does not provide a systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of this approach, but aims at sharing ideas and experience with participants of the Learning and Teaching Conference in an interactive round-table discussion.

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  • Cooperative learning: theory into practice

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    At the 2008 IASCE/IAIE conference in Turin, Trish Baker and Jill Clark presented a model for using assessed cooperative learning techniques with ethnically and linguistically diverse groups. The model consisted of four steps: training lecturers in cooperative learning techniques, training students in cooperative learning techniques, monitoring the groups' performance, and debriefing both lecturers and students. This research paper and presentation reports on a New Zealand tertiary business course that piloted the model with culturally diverse student groups. Results from this pilot study suggest that the thorough preparation and monitoring of diverse student groups by a lecturer trained in cooperative learning techniques led to superior academic achievement and greater student satisfaction for most groups. Successful groups were able to identify the skills they had acquired from the cooperative experience, particularly the transferable skills. Not all groups, however, derived the full benefit from the use of the model. Issues of individual motivation, openness to feedback,and a lack of generic skills contributed to the comparatively poor performance of one of the groups. The results of this research project suggest that the challenges of implementing cooperative learning groups wih culturally and linguistically diverse groups may be met by ensuring that both lecturers and students follow the guidelines outlined in the model. This paper recommends further trialing of the model with a larger sample.

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  • Developing the Pacific nursing workforce

    Southwick, Margaret (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Currently, the New Zealand nursing workforce is predominantly pakeha. The growing proportion of Pacific people in the wider population is not being reflected in the New Zealand nursing workforce. Previous research by Southwick showed that Pacific Island students had a high drop out rate from nursing programmes. In 2004, the Bachelor in Nursing (Pacific) programme commenced at Whitireia Community Polytechnic. Challenges and results of this programme are discussed.

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  • Cooperative learning: a double edged sword

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Although there has been very little research done in co-operative learning in New Zealand, international research is positive about the educational benefits of working in culturally diverse groups. This paper presents the findings of a research project examining New Zealand experiences with co-operative learning in multicultural groups. The paper presents findings from surveys and focus groups with both domestic and international students and with New Zealand tertiary lecturers who use collaborative learning techniques in their programmes. The findings from this research indicate that there is a strong cultural conflict in the conceptualisation of cooperative learning between international students with little prior experience of cooperative learning and New Zealand lecturers who are often not fully prepared to help international students to bridge the gaps. The majority of international students value lecturers' programme content delivery and the achievement of high marks over the development of interpersonal skills; this is contrary to New Zealand lecturers' belief that the development of team skills is the most important outcome from cooperative learning. This cognitive dissonance reinforces the importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on student patterns of classroom behaviour. This paper recommends that domestic and international students be prepared more effectively for cooperative learning and that lecturers be trained in designing curricula and assessment programmes that are pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. The paper proposes a model to assist lecturers to achieve this aim.

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  • Trailblazers - primary health care programme evaluation

    Holloway, Kathy (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Trailblazers are those that forge the way to enable others to follow. This report is an evaluation of the academic journey undertaken by a group of newly graduated nurses who were sponsored by a New Zealand District Health Board (DHB) to work in a variety of primary health care nursing settings. The impetus for this pilot employment option was the Ministry of Health's focus on primary health care nursing and workforce development for this sector and the Expert Advisory Committee for primary health care nursing's recommendations to DHB's regarding employment of graduate nurses and support for them to engage in post graduate study. Evaluation participants were primarily the graduate nurses who were interviewed at the end of their first year of practice which was following programme completion then again nine to ten months later. Findings include the nurses reflections on what supported them and what acted to impede as barriers to their learning success and practice development. The report concludes with five recommendations that can be used to ensure that the travels of future newly graduated nurses taking this pathway are supported, safe and successful.

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  • We carry their stories: Narratives of cultural safety practice in day-to-day nursing practice

    Richardson, Fran (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses selected findings of a PhD research project. The research investigates the way registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day nursing practice.

    Cultural safety education sits within a critical framework and focuses on power relations in the delivery of health care. The concept grew out of the identity politics movements of the 1970s and 1980s. Identity politics asserts that individuals and groups have the right to claim an identity that is reflective of how they see themselves rather than how others see them. Identity politics asserts the right for marginalised individuals and groups to claim and occupy the same social, public and political spaces as their more dominant counterparts.

    Cultural safety was introduced into the New Zealand nursing curriculum in 1992 (Ramsden, 1993). Since that time little research has been undertaken which specifically explores how registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. The focus of cultural safety is on how the nurse understands and works with power in the context of health care. It is about the nurse coming to understand how attitudes and beliefs shape, influence or affect the delivery of nursing and health care. Central to this understanding is the nurse's willingness to recognise notions of difference within health care relationships.

    This research uses a narrative approach to explore the question "the ways registered nurses apply cultural safety in their day to day nursing practice". It is through the researcher's interpretation of story that the qualitative experience of culturally safe nursing practice is illuminated. Narrative methodology informed the approach to interviewing sixteen registered nurses from a range of practice areas within New Zealand. The nurses were asked for stories about how they applied cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. It is how these stories were co - constructed, given meaning by the participants, and interpreted by the researcher which provided the data for analysis and discussion.

    This paper draws on selected stories of cultural safety in practice to highlight the multifaceted nature of cultural safety and reveals the complexity and multiple influences on the application of cultural safety knowledge in practice.

    The paper concludes with a summary of how this research might contribute to the development of new understandings about what cultural safety means as nursing moves further into the 21st century.

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