9 results for Conference item, UC Research Repository

  • Recovering from a natural disaster

    Kingham, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Invited Keynote: Laboratory Christchurch : Redefining stormwater system resilience in a multihazard environment

    Hart, D.E. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Earthquakes and the rebuild of Christchurch: how Geography provides the answers

    Kingham, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Geography and health

    Kingham, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Reverse greed in energy and transport

    Kingham, S.; Muir, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Innovation in the analysis of therapeutic change: Combining both idiographic and nomothetic approaches in one visual analysis

    Blampied, N.M. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

    For decades there have been calls for clinical research in psychology to be more idiographic and less dependent on group statistical inference, because what applies in aggregate (nomothetic research) does not necessarily apply to any specific individual (idiographic application). Recommended alternatives include more extensive use of graphs and visual analysis of data. This presentation describes the history, construction and interpretation of modified Brinley plots, a technique for analysing treatment outcomes for individuals within groups that is particularly suitable for therapy outcome research, especially during the treatment-development phase when full randomized controlled trials may be premature. Modified Brinley plots are scatter-plots that compare individual scores at time 1 (normally pretreatment) with scores at various times post-treatment. If the origin and axis scales of the graph are the same no or little change is shown by data points clustering on or about the 45o diagonal line. Change over time (improvement or deterioration) is shown by shifts away from the diagonal. Interpretation is aided by the addition of clinical cut-offs, and by the use of the Reliable Change Index (based on measurement error), features which partition the graph space into meaningful zones. In addition to displaying individuals’ data, these graphs may also display group effects such as means, variances, confidence intervals, and effect sizes. Both between-group and within-group data may be presented and analysed this way and large amounts of data can be efficiently presented and clearly understood within one figure.

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  • Zombies, Schmonceivability and the Mirroring Objection: All Escape-Routes Barred

    Campbell DI (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Gli inizi della filogia a Roma: traduzione e trasformazione

    Sciarrino E (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Limits of Humanism in an Era of Ecological Crisis

    Locke PEG (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

    At a time when earth system scientists are suggesting that the disruptive ecological agency of humanity has reached geological proportions, social theorists are vigorously questioning the intellectually constructed chasms between the human and the nonhuman, the cultural and the natural, and even the sciences and the humanities. In the light of our ecological predicament then, I explore the precipitating conditions for the related developments of posthumanism, multinaturalism, and the ontological turn, all of which are concerned with reconnecting the isolated figure of the cultural human with the lively environments of more-than-human communication in which it dwells. Reviewing a range of provocative proposals, and noting a (re)turn toward materiality, the nonhuman, and the non-representational in contemporary social theory, I consider the constitutive significance of the Saussurean sign for a linguo-centric tradition of social theory unable to adequately incorporate the nonhuman lifeforms and biogeochemical processes of our cohabited world into accounts of the human condition.

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