23 results for Conference item, Unitec Research Bank, 2010

  • Notions of wellbeing and interdependence embedded within ecologically sustainable early childhood pedagogies in Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2010-12-14)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Through the growing international concern regarding the impacts of environmental degradation and the depletion and exploitation of natural resources on our planet’s wellbeing, we are being challenged as individuals and educators as to how we can change our practices and pedagogies in order to replenish and protect our planet. This can be seen to require a shift away from an individualistic paradigm to one which recognises our inter-subjectivity, interdependence, inter-connectedness and inter-relatedness as planetary beings, members of a shared woven universe (Marsden, 2003). This is a worldview that has been upheld by indigenous people despite the impacts of colonisation (Cardinal, 2001; Haig-Brown & Dannenmann, 2002; J. Patterson, 2000). For the Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand, “the spiritual unity of the child with the land, with its people, and with the Universe at large is as one” (Reedy, 1995). In Western discourses also there has been growing awareness of a need to prioritise an ethic of care based in recognition of the interdependent nature of individual and collective wellbeing within our academic and professional discourses and enactment (Foucault, 1997; Gilligan, 1982; Noddings, 1995; Rinaldi, 2006). This paper reports on a New Zealand study conducted during 2008-9, which employed a synthesis of narrative and kaupapa Māori methodologies (Clandinin, 2007; L. T. Smith, 1999) to illuminate transformative early childhood discourses and pedagogies that reflect both Māori and Western ecological understandings. The focus of this study has relevance towards enacting “an ethic of global caring” generated within early years education (Said, 1993, p. 21).

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  • Visual dialogues, community action & social change: A south Pacific islands HIV/AIDS project application

    Thomas, Verena; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Eggins, Joys (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper explores the conceptual and methodological framework of the Komuniti Tok Piksa project, which is both, research project and community action initiative. Visual research tools are used within an indigenous research framework in order to study behavioural practices, perceptions and needs in regards to HIV and AIDS in Papua New Guinea. It explores the ways in which visual methods when paired with a community action approach can be used to facilitate social change and to encourage new engagements between researchers and participants.

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  • Convenient fictions? A critical communicative perspective on financial accumulation, autopoiesis and crisis in the wake of the credit crunch

    Thompson, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recent turmoil in the financial markets following the sub-prime mortgage crisis and the credit crunch has repercussions in many other spheres of society. Governments have spent trillions of taxpayer dollars propping up the banking system in order to avoid systemic financial collapse. Significant public policy questions are being raised about the sustainability of the monetarist macroeconomic paradigm and the dogmatic neoliberal faith in financial deregulation. Media discourses have included open criticism of the finance sector. However, the right of private banks to create money through the issuance of credit and the generation of fictitious values through the securitisation of anticipated future revenue remain peripheral to policy debate, even though they lie at the heart of the recent crises. Although Marx provided the seminal critique of capitalism’s internal contradictions, his work on credit-money and financial accumulation processes were never fully developed. However, the more recent work of Hyman Minsky emphasises the role of credit systems in financial markets’ endogenous tendency toward crisis. This paper proposes to extend a Marxist critique of contemporary financial crises using Minksy’s financial instability hypothesis. However, this requires emphasis on the reflexive communicative processes underpinning credit-money and fictitious financial values. In doing so, it will highlight the role of media and communication systems in accumulation regimes and the risks posed to the lifeworld as financial processes become increasingly self-referential and autopoietic.

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  • Last chance to see? Public broadcasting policy and the public sphere in New Zealand

    Thompson, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The paper presented here is intended to provide an overview of some of the themes and issues linking theoretical and policy debates on media, democracy and public sphere, and to hopefully set the scene for further debate at the conference. The first part of the paper will compare and contrast normative models of media with a particular focus on their implicit conceptions of citizenship and civil society. The second part will map the emergent themes onto the shifts in public broadcasting policy in New Zealand under the Labour-led governments between 1999-2008. This will focus on the policy tensions that surrounded the development and implementation of the TVNZ Charter (which the current government has scheduled for ignominious abolition). The third part will endeavour to extend this analysis to the emergent broadcasting policy trajectory of the current National-led government. The conclusions will highlight the continuing policy salience of the conceptions public service and public sphere in policy debates and argue that even if these models need to be adapted to the digital multimedia environment, it would be premature to dispense with them altogether.

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  • Resources and capacity: Lessons learned from post-disaster reconstruction resourcing in Indonesia, China and Australia

    Chang, Yan; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan; Seville, Erica (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Post-disaster reconstruction poses resourcing challenges specific to the construction practitioners and requires constant improvements of the construction industry and of the environment in which it operates. By drawing on in-field surveys and observations in the disaster affected areas in Indonesia, China and Australia, the research examines their respective resourcing practice following a disaster with a particular focus on identifying the resource and capacity constraints that confronted the reconstruction practitioners in a post-disaster situation. This mapping exercise helps draw attention from decision makers and the construction sector to the vulnerable areas in post-disaster reconstruction and also generates lessons and experiences worthy of adoption in other disaster situations. Practical measures are suggested to improve the implementation of physical reconstruction through laws, regulations and policies, along with the according mechanisms in the industry and at a project level.

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  • Post-disaster recovery: Multi-agency leadership and co-ordination

    Beckett, James V.; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recovery is a vital phase in an emergency management and civil defence cycle aimed towards long-term community resilience. Leadership plays a crucial role in an emergency situation, especially in the response and recovery stages. This research examines the post-disaster rural community contexts of the 2009 Victorian Bushfires to review the leadership that exists in such a complex post-disaster environment. Soft leadership and more technical, task-based management skills are combined to establish the necessary characteristics for effective disaster leadership during a post-disaster recovery. The conclusion is reached that the most effective leadership in a recovery environment combines traits targeted towards achieving the right actions with minimal delay.

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  • Architecture for humanity: Shipping containers as Swiss Army knife

    Lee, Ja Yeun; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Surplus commercial shipping containers have re-gained popularity among developed countries recently and are often associated with fashionable, prefabricated second-homes, hotels, and even cities. However, when applied in the context of post-disaster reconstruction, it takes on a new identity as a heroic, “Swiss Army Knife” equivalent of emergency shelter that offers a potential solution to transitional and permanent housing issues in post-disaster reconstruction. In 2009, the University of Auckland in collaboration with Architecture for Humanity (AfH) offered a design studio project to develop shipping containers as prefabricated cores that boil down the vital services for shelter and basic off-grid utilities into as small a package as possible. Twelve post-graduate students from the School of Architecture developed a range of ambitious prefabricated core approaches and variations for recent disasters in twelve different locations covering and in as many climates, cultures and materials. The students faced challenges unique to each situation. Shipping containers were carefully modified for deployment at emergency stage of disaster as a self-sufficient shelter, which was also made adaptable by locals to enable full integration into the urban fabric of their city over time. Local materials and labour may be used to construct structural enclosures and building envelopes, but systems for water, waste, power and ventilation require specialist expertise and non-local components. Prefabricated cores enable such technical systems to be integrated and fabricated off-site and shipped to sites where they can be plugged on-site into a larger building project. Despite the homogenous beginning of a shipping container (the “one size fits all” approach), the potential to package it with useful components make their deployment in disasters an efficient strategy for humanitarian relief work. Enabling self-sufficiency for disaster survivors from early stages of disaster expedites recovery through empowerment and stability.

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  • The otla: A ‘free space’ in Balkrishna Doshi’s Aranya settlement

    Kaza, Krystina (2010)

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    Unitec

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  • Earthquake vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations in New Zealand

    Zare, Mohammad R.; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    New Zealand is located in an earthquake prone part of the world where earthquakes are the most common natural hazard in New Zealand. Consequently, earthquake vulnerability especially in lifelines is of great concern of earthquake prone city councils. Wastewater systems as lifelines should be able to withstand earthquakes to have the minimum impact on public health and environmental pollution. Earthquake vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations in 3 earthquake prone cities in New Zealand was assessed in this research. The assessment revealed that the non-structural components are the most vulnerable parts in wastewater pumping stations. Structural vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations is notable and requires an immediate rehabilitation plan.

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  • Planning for social outcomes

    Potangaroa, Regan; Mair, Julie Samia (2010-09-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    There is usually no purposeful connection between the physical planning of refugee camps and the social outcomes for those living in these camps with each being treated separately by independent groups or more often the case by different organizations. And while there will be some exchange of information, such as the siting of a community office, the two disciplines remain separate and separated. However, recent work by Mair et al. (Mair and Mair, 2003) suggests that there are potentially more links and connections than presently realized and certainly beyond the simple planning suggested above. This paper presents the results of a field trial of an Opportunity Matrix for Sexual Violence Against Women and Children in Refugee Camps developed by Dugan (now Mair) et al. and applied for the first time in Ardamata Camp in El Geneinna, (the provincial capital of West Darfur) in June/July 2004. Although this was not a refugee situation but rather an internally displaced person (IDP) situation, the Opportunity Matrix (OM) can be applied in IDP situations as well. The results from this field trial (albeit small) support Mair’s position that the physical and administrative environment can affect social outcomes. Whereas further field trials are necessary, the results show that planners need to better understand this linkage so as to bring about more effective planning changes for better social outcomes.

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  • Spatial syntax analysis of tent layouts

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chan, Tao (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Spatial Syntax is a set of concepts and techniques for the analysis of spatial configurations that were originally developed by Hillier and Hanson in the late 1980’s (Space Syntax, 2009). They were intended to be a tool to assist architects and town planners in the modelling of social effects of the built environment. The analysis starts with a grid layout of the study area and then uses one of 3 generally accepted spatial concepts together with one of 3 analysis techniques. The paper uses a visibility concept and a depth/distance technique to analyse operational tent layouts commonly used by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and others proposed in the shelter literature. While many advantages have been claimed for different layouts (such as the community and security arrangements for a “U” shaped tent layout over a street/row approach) none appear to have been researched, surveyed or tested. Such questions are central to the idea of community, security and protection and ultimately well being of those that Agencies seek to assist.

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  • The spatial syntax of Iraqi refugee housing in Syria

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chan, Tao (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Space Syntax developed from the work of Benedikt in 1979 and then Hillier and Hanson in 1984. Benedikt created visual maps within building plans by drawing the contours of equal visual areas calling the resulting map an ‘isovist field.’ He theorized that these isovists fields would correspond to the pattern of people’s movements and provide insight into how a space was navigated. This theory was confirmed by Hillier who together with Hanson went on to develop the approach by using a grid of nodes. Lines drawn from each node established the connectedness of that point to the remainder of the grid points within the space being studied. And it was from this that the visual graph analysis approach and spatial syntax emerged. The spatial tool has the ability to draw out spatial patterns from 2D floor plans that would not otherwise be easily quantified and it is this quality that is the subject of this paper. The paper applies the approach to the last 5 remaining households at El Hol camp in Syria of refugees from the 1990-91 Gulf conflict. The basic house data was collected in February 2003. The results support the idea of an “intimacy gradient” being inherent in the building design which may not have been otherwise identified. And that this gradient appears to be important, it is certainly vernacular, extremely subtle and perhaps fundamental at least to the design of this housing. It will be interesting to compare and discuss whether that was the case for housing in Gujarat and other areas. This paper seeks to extend earlier qualitative work on “Talking to the Building” presented at i-Rec 2008 and the use of Quality of Life surveys to measure whether people were “happy” presented at both i-Rec 2006 and 2008 as a way to understand and also verify the needs of the building’s occupants.

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  • Structural quality control in the field

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chang, Yan; Zuo, Kelvin; Wilkinson, Suzanne (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The quality control of structural elements for post disaster reconstruction in the field is problematic. Test facilities are often remote, training can be inadequate and the attitude of suppliers and contractors can be negative towards such controls resulting in less then adequate construction. This paper outlines several techniques that have been used to address such issues that included of the following: • Foundation checking using scala penetrometer testing • Concrete strength testing using rebound hammer testing • Rebar placement using cover meters These are all tests that can be completed in the field, give immediate test results that can be repeated if required and provide positive evidence for the doubting suppliers and contractors. Such tests have been used in housing projects in Banda Aceh, Sri Lanka and India with this paper focusing on the context in Banda Aceh, Indonesia.

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  • The integration of seismic resistant design & construction into the Diploma of Associate Engineering DAE (Civil) curriculum in Pakistan

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chhetri, Vickram; Timarzi, Irshad (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The 8th October 2005 Kashmir Earthquake exposed the vulnerability of Pakistan’s building stock with the collapse of both public and private buildings. Whilst appropriate building codes are now being developed and introduced, the codes alone are not going to solve the problem unless (and until) technicians and masons develop the knowledge, skills and appreciation for the design and construction of buildings in a seismically safe manner. The importance of these two groups of people is much of that vulnerability was in rural housing and it is these two groups (and in particular masons) who will deal directly with this issue. This paper outlines the development of a seismic module to assist Pakistani Educational Authorities to integrate seismic resistant design and construction components into the curricula of the Diploma of Associate Engineering DAE (Civil) and in particular how the curricula addressed: • the need to make houses and buildings actually conform to the codes. • the need for seismic resistant design and construction components for mainly nonengineered buildings in Pakistan. The process and strategy used for this module in Pakistan will have applications in other earthquake prone developing countries.

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  • Detail as fragment: The incomplete, the possibility of connection and an excess of multiplicities

    Hedges, Susan (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    ‘… and I think that, setting out from there, I will put together, piece by piece, the perfect city, made of fragments mixed with the rest, of instants separated by intervals, of signals one sends out, not knowing who receives them.’ The fragmented detail, it is argued, is the incomplete and offers multiple connections, the promise of fragments to be re-united or salvaged. The drawn fragment provides a resource upon which the architect can draw for the invention of new designs, assembling, collecting and recombining the fragments in new ways; the breaking up, distorting, multiplying, and disarranging of oddments and leftovers in the mind after the fragmenting process of perceiving, learning, forgetting and recalling. This paper attends to the drawing archive of the Auckland University for the ‘Government Warehousing, New Premises cnr Nelson and Fanshawe Streets’ (1939). This paper will discuss the drawn architectural detail through notions of fragmentation and multiplicity. In his book ‘Invisible Cities’, Italo Calvino’s version of fragmentation suggests an endless opportunity of reconstruction, connection and separation. The fragment is seen as an excess of imaginings and a clue to the story that is the unknowable whole. The fragment articulates detachment by drawing attention to the rough edges of a natural break or the clean slice of a surgical cut. A drawn fragment could be a failed work, an unrealized attempt or a partially rendered drawing. In architecture such a cut is articulated by lightening strokes, a residual reference to the broken edge. The fragmented edge is the imagined and the historical. This paper will follow the fragmented line, a small piece of a much larger work.

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  • An early childhood education ecological sustainability research perspective from Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • The challenge of reaping a harvest from school-based learning initiatives: Sources of learning through the perspectives of school leaders, teachers and students

    Youngs, Howard (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Implementing and sustaining school-wide learning initiatives through a wider distribution of leadership is espoused as a means of generating a higher quality ‘harvest’ of student learning outcomes. Two in-depth 20-month case studies situated in urban New Zealand secondary schools revealed that the ‘harvest’ of improved student learning was more challenging than first envisaged. Perspectives of the school leadership teams, the teachers and 500 students revealed multiple sources of influence in relation to student learning with some possibly related to the two respective initiatives that each school had introduced. Tensions between the change that the schools wanted to see and what they actually experienced arose due to day-to-day demands, other initiatives and a limit to resources. Consequently planting for a ‘harvest’ of improved student learning is a long one, packaged approaches and expected quick results are not realistic, nor should they be encouraged for the leadership for learning.

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  • The changing face of local egovernment in New Zealand

    Fielden, Kay; Malcolm, Pam (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In New Zealand, there is a national digital strategy with targets for 2010 in place set by the State Services Commission. In this paper, the extent to which e-participation targets have been met by local governments in New Zealand is explored, particularly with respect to social networking facilities made available on local government websites. A two-level theoretical framework based on core systems thinking principles is presented that provides a means of evaluating 2010 targets for local governments and citizens. The impact of structural change particularly on meeting 2010 participation targets for local government are explored from both local government web developers and the public view via an analysis of participation facilities offered on local government websites.

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  • The impact of stress during restructuring in a tertiary institution

    Singh, Jai; Du Plessis, Andries; Oldfield, James D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on stress during restructuring in a tertiary institution in New Zealand. Although a certain amount of stress can enhance a person’s performance, too much stress can have a reverse impact on a person’s health resulting in lower productivity. Therefore the aim of this research is to determine the impact of stress on staff effectiveness and productivity; thus determining if stress was experienced within an organisation that is currently undergoing restructuring. A quantitative research method was adopted to collect data from a large sample of participants. Surveys were carried out to determine the impact of stress and how to minimise the impact. The survey was distributed electronically to 291 participants comprising staff from “Faculty A” at a Tertiary Education Organisation (TEO) in Auckland and the response rate was 20.3%. The findings of the study demonstrate high positive results with regard to factors that cause stress within organisations during organisational restructuring. This indicates that stress was not managed up to staff expectations during the restructuring at the chosen TEO and the impact was more severe than expected.

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  • Evidence on the impact of International Financial Reporting Standards in New Zealand

    Rainsbury, Liz; San Diego, Josefino S.; Walker, Lyndon (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Purpose – This paper examines the financial impact from the adoption of international financial reporting standards (IFRS) on New Zealand (NZ) companies. It analyses the effects of IFRS on the accounting numbers reported in financial statements. It also compares the association of NZ IFRS versus NZ GAAP book value of equity and earnings with market values with particular emphasis on smaller listed companies. Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines a sample of New Zealand listed companies that adopted NZ IFRS between 2005 and 2007. Financial statement data under NZ IFRS and the previous generally accepted accounting practice were hand collected from annual reports. The data is analysed using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Findings – The adoption of IFRS resulted in statistically significant increases in earnings, assets and liabilities. The IFRS adjustments were largely as anticipated, but IFRS adoption did not improve the value relevance of the accounting numbers. The value relevance of IFRS accounting numbers was marginally lower than that of NZ GAAP. For small listed companies, and early adopters, IFRS equity adjustments reduced value relevance. Originality/value – The study examines the impact of a major regulatory change in financial reporting by documenting New Zealand’s experience with the changeover. The findings are of relevance to the accounting profession and regulators as they debate whether IFRS should be required for the preparation of external financial statements for small to medium-sized enterprises. enterprises.

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