99 results for Conference item, Modify

  • Application of nD BIM Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System (BIM-IKBMS) for Inspecting the Post-construction Energy Efficiency

    GhaffarianHoseini, A; Tookey, J; GhaffarianHoseini, AH

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The evolution of construction industry towards sustainability highlighted the absolute necessity to inspect sustainable performances throughout the post-construction building lifecycle. Correspondingly, application of relevant building management systems (BMS) to achieve this goal is mandatory (Ippolito, Riva Sanseverino, & Zizzo, 2014). In addition, conventional post-construction building inspection methods are outdated and less effective. Therefore; this research aims to propose specific utilization of BIM during building maintenance for the consequential post-construction energy efficiency. Contemporarily, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is considered as a leading technology capable of being utilized in Architecture, Engineering, Construction (AEC) practices highlighting its critical role in enhancing the effectiveness of project delivery from conceptual initiation to eventualization and even post-construction maintenance (Ding, Zhou, & Akinci, 2014; Volk, Stengel, & Schultmann, 2014). Alternatively, despite the recent presentation of BIM to the AEC industry, it has widely emerged to an undisputedly contributive technology towards advancement of AEC implementations. Furthermore, BIM’s capability of nD project integrations has prominently highlighted its potential effectiveness while being accurately incorporated with sustainable performances (Farr, Piroozfar, & Robinson, 2014). Moreover, researchers have highlighted that information gathering and modelling through BIM can reduce respective building energy consumptions (Lawrence et al., 2012). The remarkable proportion of global energy consumption by the construction industry has fundamentally driven the concentration on decreasing the building energy consumption via amplified sensor data and improved computational support for building controls (Klein et al., 2012). Subsequently, it is vital to balance the maximization of building energy efficiency and users’ desired level of comfort while employing an efficient BMS for sustainable maintenance of facility operations overstressing the implication of post-construction building inspection. Researchers have overstressed that application of an efficient Facility Maintenance and Management systems (FMM) enables executives to detect problems primarily and sustain the facility more effectively (Chen, Hou, & Wang, 2013). On the other hand, the conventional inspection method of progress tracking practice would solely rely on manual visual assessments and periodical respective reports. This progress consisted of logs and checklists manually prepared to indicate the project’s level of adaptability with the required milestones and specifications (Bosché, Ahmed, Turkan, Haas, & Haas, 2014). Effectiveness and accuracy of the corresponding inspection progress would have been affected based on the individual’s personal judgment and observational skills. Additionally, high probability of inaccurate manual building inspections plus the lack of real-time input of dynamic factors urges development of automated BMS. Therefore, Building Information Modelling (BIM) plays a key role towards automation in construction and corresponding management systems. However, adequate skills; competence and enthusiasm of construction role-players and contractors is a significantly important issue towards future success of such propositions (Miettinen & Paavola, 2014). Additionally, the progression of AEC building delivery includes design, construction, contracting and maintenance. This complex process, engaging multi-layer and multi-domain information storage and exchange, necessitates integrative contributions from versatile and incorporative professional teams thus; competent information sharing among players is a critical factor towards success therefore; a proposed BIM system capable of resolving AEC interoperability complications would remarkably enhance the overall project output and respectively the building energy efficiency throughout its lifecycle (Dong, O'Neill, & Li, 2014). Despite the nD capability of BIM enabling its potential practice during versatile building lifecycle phases, designers-contractors focused primarily on the application of BIM during design-construction management stages. Furthermore, positive prospects of BIM’s potential to be applied throughout the post-construction energy efficiency enhancements can be augmented while highlighting the conceivable successful utilization of BIM during corrective building maintenance management concerns compared to preventive concerns (Motawa & Almarshad, 2013). Moreover, integration of knowledge management systems empowering handling and sharing of respective building maintenance information over the building lifecycle is an inevitable essential during post-construction sustainable performances. Harmoniously, contemporary sustainable developments incorporate advancement of exploiting the aforementioned practices. Congruently, focusing on the building energy efficiency, this article suggests engagement of an Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System using nD BIM applications (BIM-IKBMS) during the post-construction building lifecycle to advance the implementation of sustainable building performances.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in Tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935

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  • Disaster e-Health: a new paradigm for collaborative healthcare in disasters

    Parry, D; Norris, A; Madanian, S; Martinez,, S; Labaka, L; Gonzalez, JJ

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Disaster management and disaster medicine are well-established disciplines for responding to disasters and providing care for individuals whose health and wellbeing has been affected. However, these disciplines have different origins, development, and priorities so that communication and coordination across them during disasters is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, inappropriate or even unavailable care. Moreover, neither discipline exploits the new range of ehealth technologies such as the electronic health record or telehealth and mobile health that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare. We need a new paradigm that applies information and e-health technologies to improve disaster health planning and response. This paper describes the initial stages of a project to develop such a paradigm by scoping and developing the area of disaster e-health.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Sreekumar, A; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935.

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  • 60 years of creativity in business organizations

    Sosa Medina, R; Connor, AM; Rive, P

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper analyses the role of creativity in business organizations by examining the core ideas of an article published sixty years ago as a way to elucidate how relevant they are today in view of the research literature. The paper proposes the use of computational social simulations to support systematic reasoning about some of these longstanding issues around organizational creativity. An example of an agent-based simulation to study team ideation is presented to support systematic reasoning about the role of creativity in business organizations and to articulate future lines of inquiry.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Murdoch, C; Miller, K; Schweer, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • Research Repository Case Studies

    Hayes, Leonie; Morgan, Teula; Ruthven, Tom (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/ A Research Repository Managers Symposium invites managers to submit a “Case Study” outlining the way that their institution has decided to deliver the requirements for ERA – Excellence in Research for Australia and PBRF Performance‐Based Research Fund in New Zealand. The symposium session asks authors of the case studies to briefly share their case studies, followed by a guided discussion session determined by participants. The Case Studies will be compiled into a comprehensive document for public distribution via the Educause Australasia 2009 Conference site. For other similar Case Studies see the ones compiled by Open Repositories 2008 Conference in the UK http://pubs.or08.ecs.soton.ac.uk/86/ The focus of this symposium is how Research Repositories support tertiary institutions in delivering Research Data Collection in Australia and New Zealand. Themes and information to address in the Case Study would be Institutional overview Models – comment on your institutional model based on the Arrow HERDC report http://www.arrow.edu.au/docs/files/arrow-herdc-workinggroupreport.pdf Institutional Embedding and Innovative Practices Relationships with Research Management Systems Sustainability Outreach, Marketing and Faculty Engagement Technical Environment and Information Technology strategies Lessons learned and Future Plans.

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  • Luxury or necessity? Enhancing bibliographic records at The University of Auckland Library

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2005)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The local catalogue is supposed to be most attuned to the needs of the local user, but how do we know that what cataloguers consider as valuable information really answers the users’ needs? Lately, issues of retrieval and usefulness of data elements in bibliographic records have caused some concerns. New and constantly changing environments require current cataloguing conventions and MARC record structures to be re-examined. There has also been increasing interest in enhancing bibliographic records with additional content-bearing information. In the University of Auckland Library much work has been done over the last few years on improving access to our monograph collections. To find ways to add value to bibliographic records, cataloguers have to be critical in their analysis and able to improve upon the information provided in bibliographic records provided by external sources. This paper will discuss the parameters we had to find, explain how we decided which elements of data are critical for retrieving material from different collections, and how we examined what effect this will have on our catalogue. It will also describe some of the bibliographic enhancements we have done (additional subject headings; addition of Tables of Contents data; authorities) and how they improved access in bibliographic retrieval.

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  • Digital Picnic

    Garraway, John (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The University of Auckland Library lifts the lid on its hamper of digital goodies and invites conference attendees to sample from the rich spread prepared by the Library's staff. The menu selection will allow participants in a relaxed picnic style workshop to have an insight into how the University of Auckland Library has utilised emerging technologies and different approaches to meet changing user needs for research, teaching, and learning. The fare will include the creation of digitised collections, the refreshing of existing information products and services, the development of new tools and websites for discovery, accompanied by a virtual tour of internationally recognised digital resources available from the University of Auckland Library. There is something for everyone's taste including Art, Literature, History, Statistics, Theses - mostly with a distinctive New Zealand flavour. You will have ample time to digest what's on offer with the added opportunity to meet and quiz "the chefs". We guarantee you will leave sated and eager to share this content with your users, allowing them to partake in your experience as well at little or no expense to your library service!

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  • Thinking ahead for the researchers: a multi-pronged approach to research support

    Pang, LK; Mountifield, Hester (2016-02-10)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Research Support Services (RSS) team at the University of Auckland?s Libraries and Learning Services (L&LS) undertakes innovative approaches to engage with researchers in a changing landscape. Two research management systems, Research Outputs and the Research Repository, are embedded into different institutional processes and systems. A BiblioInformatics service is offered to individual researchers, providing guidance and advice for maximising research visibility and an automated platform is available for generating impact reports. Benchmarking reports are produced for senior management using various tools. New ventures include social media workshops and a collaborative effort with Architecture researchers to reconceptualise research outputs and impact.

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  • Research Repository Case Study: The University of Auckland Library, New Zealand

    Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This case study outlines the organisational context, mission statement, underlying business drivers and implementation pathway for ResearchSpace, The University of Auckland’s research repository. An outline of the institutional embedding and engagement activities along with the service sustainability issues and policy formation are addressed. The first years of activity from 2006 to 2008 and the move from pilot repository to repository service are described.

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  • Improving outcomes for Pasifika students in an academic writing course.

    Matheson, Neil (2013-05-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    With assessment at the tertiary level still based largely on writing output, the ability to write well is a decisive factor in academic success. This is one reason behind the popularity of an academic writing course at a New Zealand university. Arts faculty targeted admission programme requirements and English language diagnostic recommendations have increased enrolments in this course, but disproportionately poor outcomes for Pasifika students indicate the course may be acting more as a barrier than the intended step to academic success for this group. This paper describes a project undertaken to identify and address immediate issues contributing to such outcomes for Pasifika students. Steps taken include finding out more about the students, closer collaboration between support and academic staff, adaptation of course content, assessment processes and classroom practice, and a greater focus on student engagement throughout the course. Interim results of this project in its first semester of operation will be reported.

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  • Across the ditch: the collective diabetic foot assessment

    Rome, K; Ihaka, B (2011-08-24)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • An immense clip: film, philosophy and the proximate violence of becoming

    O'Connor, MT (2012-04-08)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Three conditions of becoming-image weave their way through this analysis in a consideration of violence as an ethical imperative with respect to the experimental sensate cinema of French filmmaker Philippe Grandrieux, in particular, his second feature La Vie Nouvelle (2002). The weave of movement, rest and proximity tighten, in suggesting violence as an ethical moment in our becoming-image. This paradoxical critique of an ethics of violence eventually finds an arresting moment in proximity of the image-experience through its ontological montage structure as that continuous passage of our existence as proximate beings. With a critique of telecommunication and networked information technologies as those delivery systems for pain at a distance, we locate in Grandrieux something arresting that testifies to the impossibility of being elsewhere. All image encounters today, given their excessive presence, testify without alibi, without elsewhere as reference point, to the perpetuation of us as being in a middle (milieu) of an “immense clip” without end or establishment. Becoming imperceptible in the becoming-image of our material sensate being incepts three moments of imperceptibility: Deleuze and Guattari’s shadow-plane as chaos that envelopes us all for future possible people and earth; Grandrieux’s mutant-style productive of perpetual darkness; and Maurice Blanchot’s riveting thought on the artwork as that testimony to a without exit of our being in what he describes as le mourir or the “other night.” Together they weave something akin to a poetics of darkness on the thought of image and image of thought.

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  • Using Design Science to build a Watermark System for Righful Ownership Protection in the Cloud

    Cusack, B; Khaleghparast, R

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Cloud computing opportunities have presented service options for users that are both economical and flexible to use requirements. However, the risk analysis for the user identifies vulnerabilities for intellectual property ownership and vulnerabilities for the identification of rightful property owners when cloud services are used. It is common for image owners to embed watermarks and other security mechanisms into their property so that the rightful ownership may be identified. In this paper we present a design that overcomes many of the current limitations in cloud watermarking uses and propose a schema that places responsibility on the cloud provider to have a robust information protection program. Such a design solution lays out an information security architecture that enhances utility for cloud services and gives better options for users to securely place properties in the cloud. The Design Science methodology is used to build the artefact.

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  • Reliability of the Tekscan Matscan® System for the Measurement of Postural Stability in Older People With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Brenton-Rule, A; Mattock, J; Carroll, M; Dalbeth, N; Bassett, S; Menz, HB; Rome, K

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Postural stability can be measured in clinical and research settings using portable plantar pressure systems. People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have decreased postural stability compared to non-RA populations and impaired postural stability is associated with falls in people with RA. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system in assessing postural stability in people with RA.

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  • Living Well With Disability: Needs, Values and Competing Factors

    Mudge, S; Kayes, NM; Stavric, VA; Channon, AS; Kersten, P; McPherson, KM

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background Obesity is more prevalent for disabled people (estimated as being between 27-62%) compared to the general population (17-22%). Disabled people are more likely to report poorer general health and acquire a range of obesity-related secondary conditions. Although there are many physical activity and nutrition initiatives aimed at obesity prevention, little is known about whether these options are relevant and accessible for disabled people. The Living Well Study aimed to better understand the issues faced by disabled people when engaging in physical activity and healthy eating. Methods The study drew on a participatory action research design involving key stakeholders. There were two core cyclical phases (A and B), in which data collection was followed by a period of analysis, reflection and refinement. Focus groups and interviews were held with individuals who experience a range of disabilities, family members, service providers and representatives from disability advocacy groups. We sought to explore the importance and meaning of physical activity and healthy eating and factors that influenced engagement in these. Data in phase A were analysed using conventional content analysis drawing on constant comparative methods to identify themes of importance. In phase B, data analysis occurred alongside data collection, using a structured template to summarise participants’ agreement or disagreement with the draft themes and recommendations, until the themes and recommendations were refined based on participants’ corroboration. Results 146 participants aged between 10–69 years, from both rural and urban areas and of different cultural backgrounds participated. Seven interconnecting themes that related to engagement in living well behaviours emerged with a wide range of external factors (such as people, knowledge, time, cost, identity and the environment) impacting on living well options. The central theme - It depends: needs, values and competing factors - emphasised the complexity faced by a disabled person when balancing the external factors with their own personal values and needs in order to arrive at a decision to engage in healthy living behaviours. Conclusions Although disabled people experience similar issues when participating in healthy living behaviours as those living without disability, additional factors need to be addressed in order to improve opportunities for ‘living well’ in these populations. This information has implications for health professionals to target the relevance and content of interventions.

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  • Matariki, commodity culture, and multiple identities

    Hardy, Ann (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The event known as Matariki, the rising of the Pleiades in winter, which Māori take as the mark of the beginning of a new year, was not a strong feature of the wider public sphere for most of the 20th century. Since 2001, however, when Te Taura Whiri, the Māori Language Commission, published an explanatory booklet with the aim of reviving interest in Matariki as an aide to the maintenance of te reo, it has been promoted by several quasi-governmental institutions, especially the national museum, Te Papa, as a winter festival for all New Zealanders. Its main public presence to date has been through media products: posters, banners, websites, television programmes, newspaper features, calendars, some theatrical performances and physical commemoration ceremonies. The larger project, of which this paper represents an initial descriptive and positioning phase, is a continuation of the researcher's long-standing interest in the intersections of religiosity, culture, and media as they are active in the environment of Aotearoa New Zealand. It assumes, building on theorists such as Bellah and Lundby that the creation of such festivals is an act of 'civil religiosity' that attempts to create and strengthen national community around a set of numinous symbols. However, the development of an enterprise such as Matariki is pursued in a complex political field, where broad agreement across various factions is needed before the festival can take on an enduring material and symbolic existence. In investigating the factors that will determine the future of Matariki it is relevant to consider the interaction of three factors in particular: the ethno-political history of New Zealand; the characteristics of contemporary reflexive spirituality, which are intertwined with commodificatory tendencies and thirdly, the impacts of increasing globalisation on the parameters of identity-formation for citizens in late-modern societies.

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  • Investigating the Effects of Robot-assisted Therapy Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Biomarkers

    Bharatharaj, J; Huang, L; Al-Jumaily, AM; Krageloh, C; Elara, MR

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Therapeutic pet robots designed to help humans with various medical conditions could play a vital role in physiological, psychological and social-interaction interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In this paper, we report our findings from a robot-assisted therapeutic study conducted over seven weeks to investigate the changes in stress levels of children with ASD. For this study, we used the parrot-inspired therapeutic robot, KiliRo, we developed and investigated urinary and salivary samples of participating children to report changes in stress levels before and after interacting with the robot. This is a pioneering human-robot interaction study to investigate the effects of robot-assisted therapy using salivary samples. The results show that the bio-inspired robot-assisted therapy can significantly help reduce the stress levels of children with ASD.

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  • SCALE-UP Implementation and Intra-Institutional Dissemination: A Case Study of Two Institutions

    Foote, KF; Neumeyer, X; Henderson, C; Dancy, M; Beichner, R (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much time, money and effort has been spent developing innovative teaching methods that have been shown to improve student learning in college classes. Although these have had some influence on mainstream teaching, many have failed to bring about widespread transformation. This exploratory case study examines the intra-institutional diffusion of the SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-Down Pedagogies) reform [1]. We interviewed key contact people at two, large, public institutions where SCALE-UP has spread in multiple departments. Our preliminary findings indicate that broad adoption is facilitated by faculty-administrative partnership, interdisciplinary reform efforts and redesigned classrooms that raise visibility.

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