89 results for Conference item, Modify

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Application of nD BIM Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System (BIM-IKBMS) for Inspecting the Post-construction Energy Efficiency

    GhaffarianHoseini, A; Tookey, J; GhaffarianHoseini, AH

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The evolution of construction industry towards sustainability highlighted the absolute necessity to inspect sustainable performances throughout the post-construction building lifecycle. Correspondingly, application of relevant building management systems (BMS) to achieve this goal is mandatory (Ippolito, Riva Sanseverino, & Zizzo, 2014). In addition, conventional post-construction building inspection methods are outdated and less effective. Therefore; this research aims to propose specific utilization of BIM during building maintenance for the consequential post-construction energy efficiency. Contemporarily, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is considered as a leading technology capable of being utilized in Architecture, Engineering, Construction (AEC) practices highlighting its critical role in enhancing the effectiveness of project delivery from conceptual initiation to eventualization and even post-construction maintenance (Ding, Zhou, & Akinci, 2014; Volk, Stengel, & Schultmann, 2014). Alternatively, despite the recent presentation of BIM to the AEC industry, it has widely emerged to an undisputedly contributive technology towards advancement of AEC implementations. Furthermore, BIM’s capability of nD project integrations has prominently highlighted its potential effectiveness while being accurately incorporated with sustainable performances (Farr, Piroozfar, & Robinson, 2014). Moreover, researchers have highlighted that information gathering and modelling through BIM can reduce respective building energy consumptions (Lawrence et al., 2012). The remarkable proportion of global energy consumption by the construction industry has fundamentally driven the concentration on decreasing the building energy consumption via amplified sensor data and improved computational support for building controls (Klein et al., 2012). Subsequently, it is vital to balance the maximization of building energy efficiency and users’ desired level of comfort while employing an efficient BMS for sustainable maintenance of facility operations overstressing the implication of post-construction building inspection. Researchers have overstressed that application of an efficient Facility Maintenance and Management systems (FMM) enables executives to detect problems primarily and sustain the facility more effectively (Chen, Hou, & Wang, 2013). On the other hand, the conventional inspection method of progress tracking practice would solely rely on manual visual assessments and periodical respective reports. This progress consisted of logs and checklists manually prepared to indicate the project’s level of adaptability with the required milestones and specifications (Bosché, Ahmed, Turkan, Haas, & Haas, 2014). Effectiveness and accuracy of the corresponding inspection progress would have been affected based on the individual’s personal judgment and observational skills. Additionally, high probability of inaccurate manual building inspections plus the lack of real-time input of dynamic factors urges development of automated BMS. Therefore, Building Information Modelling (BIM) plays a key role towards automation in construction and corresponding management systems. However, adequate skills; competence and enthusiasm of construction role-players and contractors is a significantly important issue towards future success of such propositions (Miettinen & Paavola, 2014). Additionally, the progression of AEC building delivery includes design, construction, contracting and maintenance. This complex process, engaging multi-layer and multi-domain information storage and exchange, necessitates integrative contributions from versatile and incorporative professional teams thus; competent information sharing among players is a critical factor towards success therefore; a proposed BIM system capable of resolving AEC interoperability complications would remarkably enhance the overall project output and respectively the building energy efficiency throughout its lifecycle (Dong, O'Neill, & Li, 2014). Despite the nD capability of BIM enabling its potential practice during versatile building lifecycle phases, designers-contractors focused primarily on the application of BIM during design-construction management stages. Furthermore, positive prospects of BIM’s potential to be applied throughout the post-construction energy efficiency enhancements can be augmented while highlighting the conceivable successful utilization of BIM during corrective building maintenance management concerns compared to preventive concerns (Motawa & Almarshad, 2013). Moreover, integration of knowledge management systems empowering handling and sharing of respective building maintenance information over the building lifecycle is an inevitable essential during post-construction sustainable performances. Harmoniously, contemporary sustainable developments incorporate advancement of exploiting the aforementioned practices. Congruently, focusing on the building energy efficiency, this article suggests engagement of an Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System using nD BIM applications (BIM-IKBMS) during the post-construction building lifecycle to advance the implementation of sustainable building performances.

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  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • Constipation: A commonly costly complex condition

    Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Adams, Judith; Gallagher, Sarah; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • What's for dinner? Relative and absolute differences in food prices

    Duncanson, Mavis; Boston, Grace; Parnell, Winsome; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in Tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935

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  • Disaster e-Health: a new paradigm for collaborative healthcare in disasters

    Parry, D; Norris, A; Madanian, S; Martinez,, S; Labaka, L; Gonzalez, JJ

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Disaster management and disaster medicine are well-established disciplines for responding to disasters and providing care for individuals whose health and wellbeing has been affected. However, these disciplines have different origins, development, and priorities so that communication and coordination across them during disasters is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, inappropriate or even unavailable care. Moreover, neither discipline exploits the new range of ehealth technologies such as the electronic health record or telehealth and mobile health that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare. We need a new paradigm that applies information and e-health technologies to improve disaster health planning and response. This paper describes the initial stages of a project to develop such a paradigm by scoping and developing the area of disaster e-health.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Sreekumar, A; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935.

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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  • The effect of recent adverse events and psychotic symptomatology among people with schizophrenia

    Gale, Christopher; Mullen, Richard; Patterson, Tess; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There have been considerable investigations in recent years of the correlation of early life event interactions, with psychotic symptomatology, with suggestions of causal links.. However, most of these investigations do not consider more recent life events at the same time. Outpatients with schizophrenia were surveyed using the CIS-R and PANNS. Questions from the life events module were weighted by the frequency of events and correlated with PANSS positive, negative and total scores and suicidality questions An association was found between lifetime sexual abuse, and positive symptoms a victim of a crime and home violence with positive symptoms, and between being in difficulties with the police and suicidality. Lifetime bullying was associated with a decrease in negative symptoms. Further investigations of life events need to consider both early and recent events.

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  • Influence of covariates on treatment outcome in placebo-controlled trials of benzodiazepines in GAD

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Wilkinson, Sam; McMurdo, Maave; Rapsey, Charlene; Coverdale, John; Guaiana, Giuseppe (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There was a variation in the subject and title from abstract submission to poster with the poster concentrating far more explicitly on modelling the causation of heterogeneity within the database of RCTs.

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  • 60 years of creativity in business organizations

    Sosa Medina, R; Connor, AM; Rive, P

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper analyses the role of creativity in business organizations by examining the core ideas of an article published sixty years ago as a way to elucidate how relevant they are today in view of the research literature. The paper proposes the use of computational social simulations to support systematic reasoning about some of these longstanding issues around organizational creativity. An example of an agent-based simulation to study team ideation is presented to support systematic reasoning about the role of creativity in business organizations and to articulate future lines of inquiry.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Murdoch, C; Miller, K; Schweer, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • Illuminating Otago Heritage

    Brown, Allison; Delaborde, Emmanuel (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Poster introduction: Goal: Optimise the University Library's DAMS (Digital Asset Management System) workflows relating to ingest and curation of our digital collections. Issue: The standard ingest process for Islandora requires a separate ingest form per format. Solution: A single ingest process for different formats - re-use metadata from other databases e.g. MINISIS and Alma (see main Workflow) - provide a straightforward bulk ingest process (see Coingest) - establish ongoing syncing of metadata from other databases (see Cosync). Submitted paper abstract: The University of Otago Library is responsible for the curation of extensive New Zealand and other heritage collections, in particular, those housed within the Hocken Collections. The need to better curate and showcase these collections to the widest possible audience has informed the development of a digital preservation solution for all Library digital assets, including, but extending beyond these valued heritage items. This presentation will outline the Library strategy for building staff capacity and knowledge around (a) the preservation and curation of our digital assets, (b) the establishment of Curation Framework policies, and (c) the development of a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). With attention shifting from access (the usual focus of repository requirements) to curation, the University of Otago Library has invested in developing a DAMS to curate digital objects using Fedora Commons / Islandora software, rather than other software currently in use (for example DSpace and Omeka). Themes: Repositories and Cultural Heritage, Integrating with the Wider Web and External Systems, Managing Rights, Developing and Training Staff Audience: Repository Managers, Developers, Librarians, Archivists and anyone interested in digital curation.

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  • Pimp My Repository Management System

    Lewis, Stuart; Hayes, L (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    "Hi 'Pimp My RMS'. I drive an old Research Management System, and a classic Institutional Repository. My Research Management system works, but doesn't really *work*. The same is true of the Institutional Repository. Neither are rusty, as pieces of software they are just fine, but they don't make me look cool. They don't make the users look cool. Hardly anyone takes them out for a drive, and they are languishing unused in the institutional garage. So please... help me out, and Pimp My RMS!" This presentation will cover the work that has been undertaken at The University of Auckland by a collaboration of staff from the Library, the Research Office, and IT Services, to implement a new integrated Research Management System. Data is automatically captured into the research management system, it is reused by the institutional repository, and there is capability and opportunity for reuse in other systems.

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  • Research Repository Case Studies

    Hayes, Leonie; Morgan, Teula; Ruthven, Tom (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/ A Research Repository Managers Symposium invites managers to submit a “Case Study” outlining the way that their institution has decided to deliver the requirements for ERA – Excellence in Research for Australia and PBRF Performance‐Based Research Fund in New Zealand. The symposium session asks authors of the case studies to briefly share their case studies, followed by a guided discussion session determined by participants. The Case Studies will be compiled into a comprehensive document for public distribution via the Educause Australasia 2009 Conference site. For other similar Case Studies see the ones compiled by Open Repositories 2008 Conference in the UK http://pubs.or08.ecs.soton.ac.uk/86/ The focus of this symposium is how Research Repositories support tertiary institutions in delivering Research Data Collection in Australia and New Zealand. Themes and information to address in the Case Study would be Institutional overview Models – comment on your institutional model based on the Arrow HERDC report http://www.arrow.edu.au/docs/files/arrow-herdc-workinggroupreport.pdf Institutional Embedding and Innovative Practices Relationships with Research Management Systems Sustainability Outreach, Marketing and Faculty Engagement Technical Environment and Information Technology strategies Lessons learned and Future Plans.

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  • Luxury or necessity? Enhancing bibliographic records at The University of Auckland Library

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2005)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The local catalogue is supposed to be most attuned to the needs of the local user, but how do we know that what cataloguers consider as valuable information really answers the users’ needs? Lately, issues of retrieval and usefulness of data elements in bibliographic records have caused some concerns. New and constantly changing environments require current cataloguing conventions and MARC record structures to be re-examined. There has also been increasing interest in enhancing bibliographic records with additional content-bearing information. In the University of Auckland Library much work has been done over the last few years on improving access to our monograph collections. To find ways to add value to bibliographic records, cataloguers have to be critical in their analysis and able to improve upon the information provided in bibliographic records provided by external sources. This paper will discuss the parameters we had to find, explain how we decided which elements of data are critical for retrieving material from different collections, and how we examined what effect this will have on our catalogue. It will also describe some of the bibliographic enhancements we have done (additional subject headings; addition of Tables of Contents data; authorities) and how they improved access in bibliographic retrieval.

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  • Taming the lurking beast: can mandatory e-reporting and the creation of course lists manage copyright in the digital space?

    Johnson, Melanie; Garraway, John; Tollan, Eileen (2016-02-09)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand Universities have recently agreed to introduce mandatory e-reporting to replace the manual survey and ensure compliance with the terms of the licence agreed with Copyright Licensing New Zealand. This paper argues that digital technology has the potential to effectively manage copyright compliance in educational institutions and to counter its uncertainty . The paper considers the background that led to the decision to implement e-reporting, and how that implementation is proceeding. It also considers the benefits to the parties, what the roadblocks are and how these can potentially be overcome.

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  • Early markers of the metabolic syndrome in children born post-term

    Ayyavoo, Ahila; Hofman, Paul; Derraik, José GB; Mathai, Sarah; Stone, Peter; Sadler, Lynn; Cutfield, Wayne S (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • High unchanged incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis between 2000 and 2009 in Auckland children

    Cutfield, SW; Derraik, J; Jefferies, C; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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