117 results for Conference item, Share

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Application of nD BIM Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System (BIM-IKBMS) for Inspecting the Post-construction Energy Efficiency

    GhaffarianHoseini, A; Tookey, J; GhaffarianHoseini, AH

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The evolution of construction industry towards sustainability highlighted the absolute necessity to inspect sustainable performances throughout the post-construction building lifecycle. Correspondingly, application of relevant building management systems (BMS) to achieve this goal is mandatory (Ippolito, Riva Sanseverino, & Zizzo, 2014). In addition, conventional post-construction building inspection methods are outdated and less effective. Therefore; this research aims to propose specific utilization of BIM during building maintenance for the consequential post-construction energy efficiency. Contemporarily, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is considered as a leading technology capable of being utilized in Architecture, Engineering, Construction (AEC) practices highlighting its critical role in enhancing the effectiveness of project delivery from conceptual initiation to eventualization and even post-construction maintenance (Ding, Zhou, & Akinci, 2014; Volk, Stengel, & Schultmann, 2014). Alternatively, despite the recent presentation of BIM to the AEC industry, it has widely emerged to an undisputedly contributive technology towards advancement of AEC implementations. Furthermore, BIM’s capability of nD project integrations has prominently highlighted its potential effectiveness while being accurately incorporated with sustainable performances (Farr, Piroozfar, & Robinson, 2014). Moreover, researchers have highlighted that information gathering and modelling through BIM can reduce respective building energy consumptions (Lawrence et al., 2012). The remarkable proportion of global energy consumption by the construction industry has fundamentally driven the concentration on decreasing the building energy consumption via amplified sensor data and improved computational support for building controls (Klein et al., 2012). Subsequently, it is vital to balance the maximization of building energy efficiency and users’ desired level of comfort while employing an efficient BMS for sustainable maintenance of facility operations overstressing the implication of post-construction building inspection. Researchers have overstressed that application of an efficient Facility Maintenance and Management systems (FMM) enables executives to detect problems primarily and sustain the facility more effectively (Chen, Hou, & Wang, 2013). On the other hand, the conventional inspection method of progress tracking practice would solely rely on manual visual assessments and periodical respective reports. This progress consisted of logs and checklists manually prepared to indicate the project’s level of adaptability with the required milestones and specifications (Bosché, Ahmed, Turkan, Haas, & Haas, 2014). Effectiveness and accuracy of the corresponding inspection progress would have been affected based on the individual’s personal judgment and observational skills. Additionally, high probability of inaccurate manual building inspections plus the lack of real-time input of dynamic factors urges development of automated BMS. Therefore, Building Information Modelling (BIM) plays a key role towards automation in construction and corresponding management systems. However, adequate skills; competence and enthusiasm of construction role-players and contractors is a significantly important issue towards future success of such propositions (Miettinen & Paavola, 2014). Additionally, the progression of AEC building delivery includes design, construction, contracting and maintenance. This complex process, engaging multi-layer and multi-domain information storage and exchange, necessitates integrative contributions from versatile and incorporative professional teams thus; competent information sharing among players is a critical factor towards success therefore; a proposed BIM system capable of resolving AEC interoperability complications would remarkably enhance the overall project output and respectively the building energy efficiency throughout its lifecycle (Dong, O'Neill, & Li, 2014). Despite the nD capability of BIM enabling its potential practice during versatile building lifecycle phases, designers-contractors focused primarily on the application of BIM during design-construction management stages. Furthermore, positive prospects of BIM’s potential to be applied throughout the post-construction energy efficiency enhancements can be augmented while highlighting the conceivable successful utilization of BIM during corrective building maintenance management concerns compared to preventive concerns (Motawa & Almarshad, 2013). Moreover, integration of knowledge management systems empowering handling and sharing of respective building maintenance information over the building lifecycle is an inevitable essential during post-construction sustainable performances. Harmoniously, contemporary sustainable developments incorporate advancement of exploiting the aforementioned practices. Congruently, focusing on the building energy efficiency, this article suggests engagement of an Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System using nD BIM applications (BIM-IKBMS) during the post-construction building lifecycle to advance the implementation of sustainable building performances.

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  • Substitution In a Hybrid Remanufacturing System

    Marshall, S; Archibald, Thomas

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Increasing legislative and societal pressures are requiring manufacturers to operate more sustainably and to take responsibility for the fate of their goods after they have been used by consumers. This paper models a hybrid system in which new goods are produced and used goods are remanufactured. Newly produced goods and remanufactured goods are sold on separate markets, but can also act substitutes for each other. A semi-Markov Decision Process formulation of this problem is presented and is used to obtain an optimal policy, which specifies production, recovery and substitution decisions. The model is used explore the properties of this hybrid remanufacturing system, and in particular, the managerial implications associated with upward and downward substitution strategies are investigated.

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  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • Constipation: A commonly costly complex condition

    Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Adams, Judith; Gallagher, Sarah; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • What's for dinner? Relative and absolute differences in food prices

    Duncanson, Mavis; Boston, Grace; Parnell, Winsome; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in Tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935

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  • Disaster e-Health: a new paradigm for collaborative healthcare in disasters

    Parry, D; Norris, A; Madanian, S; Martinez,, S; Labaka, L; Gonzalez, JJ

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Disaster management and disaster medicine are well-established disciplines for responding to disasters and providing care for individuals whose health and wellbeing has been affected. However, these disciplines have different origins, development, and priorities so that communication and coordination across them during disasters is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, inappropriate or even unavailable care. Moreover, neither discipline exploits the new range of ehealth technologies such as the electronic health record or telehealth and mobile health that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare. We need a new paradigm that applies information and e-health technologies to improve disaster health planning and response. This paper describes the initial stages of a project to develop such a paradigm by scoping and developing the area of disaster e-health.

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  • Trends and age profile of 0–24 year olds hospitalised with gastroenteritis

    Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2015-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background Hospitalisations for gastroenteritis have been increasing internationally. New Zealand rates were 6.0 per 1,000 0–14 year olds in 2006–2010. Yet hospitalisation for gastroenteritis is potentially avoidable. For example, rotavirus is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of under 5 year olds. In New Zealand, rotavirus accounted for 1 in 52 children being hospitalised before they were three years. The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in the US reduced the hospitalisation rate of children. Aim To determine overall and age-specific rates of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of 0–24 year olds in New Zealand and identify the ages at greater risk. Methods A retrospective analysis of acute and semi-acute in-patient hospitalisations of 0–24 years with a primary diagnosis of gastroenteritis extracted, for the period 2000–2014, from the National Minimum Dataset. Results During 2000–2014, the gastroenteritis hospitalisation rate increased from 3.6 per 1,000 0–24 year olds (n=5,028) in 2000 to 5.3 per 1,000 (n=8,151) in 2014. The highest rates were for 0–4 year olds, and in particular those under two years of age. Non-specific gastroenteritis (45.7%), viral enteritis (32.9%), and nausea and vomiting (presumed non-infectious; 15.5%) were the predominant forms of gastroenteritis diagnosed as the reason for hospitalisation. Those aged under one year had the highest hospitalisation rates for the various forms of gastroenteritis, with the exception of rotavirus where the highest rates were for one year olds. Conclusion In New Zealand, hospitalisation rates of gastroenteritis have been increasing since 2000, particularly for 0–4 year olds. The high rates for those under two years is consistent with other research. The highest hospitalisation rates were associated with non-specific diagnoses, particularly notable within viral diagnoses, where‘other viral enteritis’ increased while the rotavirus and norovirus rates appeared stable.

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  • Prevalence of congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery in New Zealand

    Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Gardner, R. Mac (2014-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background: The indicator “congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery” (CARS) has not previously been documented for New Zealand, yet such anomalies place considerable burden on families and the health sector, for example, from lengthy stays in hospital or high fiscal costs. If treated with cost-effective surgical procedures, children with these anomalies have an improved long-term prognosis. This study describes the prevalence of CARS among total births (livebirths and fetal deaths) in New Zealand for the years 2000–2011. Methods: Information held in the National Minimum Dataset and the National Mortality Collection was used to identify cases of CARS. The selection comprised babies born live in hospital or fetal deaths with an ICD-10-AM diagnosis of: craniosynostosis, gastroschisis, omphalocele, severe congenital heart disease, digestive system malformations, or orofacial cleft. These anomalies were defined by EUROCAT (European network for the surveillance of congenital anomalies) for having a high pregnancy survival rate and a high requirement for surgery before the age of one year. Results: The birth prevalence of CARS was 4.11 per 1,000 births for 2000–2011. The most common CARS were orofacial clefts, severe congenital heart disease, and digestive malformations. The temporal trend was essentially stable for CARS, and only gastroschisis was significantly higher in 2011 than in 2000. Conclusion: The prevalence of CARS in New Zealand is comparable to rates observed for the English EUROCAT registers; however, the stable trend contrasts to the decreases seen for Europe. The requirement for paediatric surgical services is not presently monitored for New Zealand. This study highlights the continued need for these services; in particular, the increasing need for urgent post-delivery surgery for babies born with gastroschisis. This study reports CARS as diagnosed at birth, and consequently may underestimate prevalence. Extension of the indicator criteria from birth to diagnosis up to one year of age, and identification of terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly, warrant further investigation.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Sreekumar, A; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935.

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  • Libraries and wellbeing in post-earthquake Christchurch

    Gallagher, Sarah K.J.; Adams, Andrew; Howard, Anna; Robertson, Donna; Reynolds, Ryan; Winn, Coralie (2013-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    References are available in a separate document.

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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  • The effect of recent adverse events and psychotic symptomatology among people with schizophrenia

    Gale, Christopher; Mullen, Richard; Patterson, Tess; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There have been considerable investigations in recent years of the correlation of early life event interactions, with psychotic symptomatology, with suggestions of causal links.. However, most of these investigations do not consider more recent life events at the same time. Outpatients with schizophrenia were surveyed using the CIS-R and PANNS. Questions from the life events module were weighted by the frequency of events and correlated with PANSS positive, negative and total scores and suicidality questions An association was found between lifetime sexual abuse, and positive symptoms a victim of a crime and home violence with positive symptoms, and between being in difficulties with the police and suicidality. Lifetime bullying was associated with a decrease in negative symptoms. Further investigations of life events need to consider both early and recent events.

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  • Influence of covariates on treatment outcome in placebo-controlled trials of benzodiazepines in GAD

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Wilkinson, Sam; McMurdo, Maave; Rapsey, Charlene; Coverdale, John; Guaiana, Giuseppe (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There was a variation in the subject and title from abstract submission to poster with the poster concentrating far more explicitly on modelling the causation of heterogeneity within the database of RCTs.

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  • Personalized Energy Priorities: A User-Centric Application for Energy Advice

    Ford, Rebecca; Sumavsk, Ondrej; Clarke, Auren; Thorsnes, Paul (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This research presents a new web-based application, called Personalised Energy Priorities (PEP), that provides households with personalised and tailored advice on practices or technologies they might adopt to improve the energy efficiency of their home. PEP proceeds in a manner similar to an online energy audit, but combines a user centric design approach with relatively new choice modelling software that allows recommendations to be tailored to individual preferences. The tool also provides links to further information about each energy recommendation, creating a more successful, one-stop-shop for persuasion.

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  • Developing medical students’ information skills through online self-paced learning

    Gallagher, Sarah K.J. (2012-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Link to a .PDF for the poster proceedings, and a .PDF of the poster proper.

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  • Implementing Automated Photogrammetry for the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI) Facilities

    Mills, Steven; Eyers, David; Huang, Zhiyi; Leung, Kai-Cheung; Tang, Xiaoxin (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Meeting the Challenges of Teaching Spatial Technology for Archaeology at the University of Otago

    McCoy, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Using different atmospheric correction methods to classify remotely sensed data to detect liquefaction of the February 2011 earthquake in Christchurch

    Broszeit, Amelia; Ashraf, Salman (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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