40 results for Conference item, Use commercially

  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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  • The effect of recent adverse events and psychotic symptomatology among people with schizophrenia

    Gale, Christopher; Mullen, Richard; Patterson, Tess; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There have been considerable investigations in recent years of the correlation of early life event interactions, with psychotic symptomatology, with suggestions of causal links.. However, most of these investigations do not consider more recent life events at the same time. Outpatients with schizophrenia were surveyed using the CIS-R and PANNS. Questions from the life events module were weighted by the frequency of events and correlated with PANSS positive, negative and total scores and suicidality questions An association was found between lifetime sexual abuse, and positive symptoms a victim of a crime and home violence with positive symptoms, and between being in difficulties with the police and suicidality. Lifetime bullying was associated with a decrease in negative symptoms. Further investigations of life events need to consider both early and recent events.

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  • Influence of covariates on treatment outcome in placebo-controlled trials of benzodiazepines in GAD

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Wilkinson, Sam; McMurdo, Maave; Rapsey, Charlene; Coverdale, John; Guaiana, Giuseppe (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There was a variation in the subject and title from abstract submission to poster with the poster concentrating far more explicitly on modelling the causation of heterogeneity within the database of RCTs.

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  • Open access publishing

    Dawson, Roger; Cosson, Mary

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Whether you are an existing or emerging researcher find out about Open Access, author's rights, managing research outputs, providing durable and global access for your research.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Murdoch, C; Miller, K; Schweer, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • Illuminating Otago Heritage

    Brown, Allison; Delaborde, Emmanuel (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Poster introduction: Goal: Optimise the University Library's DAMS (Digital Asset Management System) workflows relating to ingest and curation of our digital collections. Issue: The standard ingest process for Islandora requires a separate ingest form per format. Solution: A single ingest process for different formats - re-use metadata from other databases e.g. MINISIS and Alma (see main Workflow) - provide a straightforward bulk ingest process (see Coingest) - establish ongoing syncing of metadata from other databases (see Cosync). Submitted paper abstract: The University of Otago Library is responsible for the curation of extensive New Zealand and other heritage collections, in particular, those housed within the Hocken Collections. The need to better curate and showcase these collections to the widest possible audience has informed the development of a digital preservation solution for all Library digital assets, including, but extending beyond these valued heritage items. This presentation will outline the Library strategy for building staff capacity and knowledge around (a) the preservation and curation of our digital assets, (b) the establishment of Curation Framework policies, and (c) the development of a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). With attention shifting from access (the usual focus of repository requirements) to curation, the University of Otago Library has invested in developing a DAMS to curate digital objects using Fedora Commons / Islandora software, rather than other software currently in use (for example DSpace and Omeka). Themes: Repositories and Cultural Heritage, Integrating with the Wider Web and External Systems, Managing Rights, Developing and Training Staff Audience: Repository Managers, Developers, Librarians, Archivists and anyone interested in digital curation.

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  • Indigenous approaches at play in creating positive student outcomes in a tertiary institution

    McFall-McCaffery, Judith; Cook, Stephanie (2016-08-13)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper demonstrates how the weaving of indigenous Pacific research, pedagogical approaches and methodologies can be effectively employed by Pacific peoples in a blended learning tertiary environment to both promote and modify academic and information literacy skills (AIL). AIL skills are part of the key attributes of the University of Auckland Graduate Profile which the University believes students require to succeed in academia. The use of Pacific indigenous methodologies like Teu le va/Tauhi va (Samoan/Tongan relationships), Tālanoa (Pacific discussion formal and informal) and the Kakala framework (Tongan pedagogy) in working with students and staff build on existing knowledge, experience and values of many students. The approach adopted has also contributed to a change in academic staff and student perceptions of AIL as ‘library’ only skills in a Pacific Studies undergraduate programme at the University. The application of an expanded “culturally and linguistically sustaining” (Paris, 2012) integrated approach in our study is producing research based positive outcomes such as: increased academic staff support for AIL integration; increase in student participation and engagement in Libraries and Learning Services workshops and First Year Students Targeted Learning Sessions. The close collaboration va/relationships and tālanoa with staff and students help address areas for further collective development, such as scaffolding and expanding research skills into the next level courses and better transparency of research skills in course assessment. This paper will be of interest to institutions with growing Pacific and other minority populations, seeking to assist students achieve positive academic outcomes.

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  • Pimp My Repository Management System

    Lewis, Stuart; Hayes, L (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    "Hi 'Pimp My RMS'. I drive an old Research Management System, and a classic Institutional Repository. My Research Management system works, but doesn't really *work*. The same is true of the Institutional Repository. Neither are rusty, as pieces of software they are just fine, but they don't make me look cool. They don't make the users look cool. Hardly anyone takes them out for a drive, and they are languishing unused in the institutional garage. So please... help me out, and Pimp My RMS!" This presentation will cover the work that has been undertaken at The University of Auckland by a collaboration of staff from the Library, the Research Office, and IT Services, to implement a new integrated Research Management System. Data is automatically captured into the research management system, it is reused by the institutional repository, and there is capability and opportunity for reuse in other systems.

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  • Early markers of the metabolic syndrome in children born post-term

    Ayyavoo, Ahila; Hofman, Paul; Derraik, José GB; Mathai, Sarah; Stone, Peter; Sadler, Lynn; Cutfield, Wayne S (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • High unchanged incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis between 2000 and 2009 in Auckland children

    Cutfield, SW; Derraik, J; Jefferies, C; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • SCALE-UP Implementation and Intra-Institutional Dissemination: A Case Study of Two Institutions

    Foote, Kathleen; Neumeyer, X; Henderson, C; Dancy, M; Beichner, R (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much time, money and effort has been spent developing innovative teaching methods that have been shown to improve student learning in college classes. Although these have had some influence on mainstream teaching, many have failed to bring about widespread transformation. This exploratory case study examines the intra-institutional diffusion of the SCALE-UP (Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-Down Pedagogies) reform [1]. We interviewed key contact people at two, large, public institutions where SCALE-UP has spread in multiple departments. Our preliminary findings indicate that broad adoption is facilitated by faculty-administrative partnership, interdisciplinary reform efforts and redesigned classrooms that raise visibility.

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  • Neurodevelopmental outcomes are normal in congenital hypothyroid children diagnosed early and treated aggressively over the first three years

    Albert, Benjamin; Heather, Natasha; Cutfield, Wayne; Webster, Dianne; Gunn, Alistair; Jefferies, Craig; Wouldes, Trecia; Roberts, Caitrin; Tregurtha, Sheryl; Stewart, Heather; Mathai, Sarah; Derraik, José; Hofman, Paul (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A practitioner’s guide to learning analytics

    Gunn, Catherine; McDonald, J; Donald, Leonie; Milne, J; Nichols, M; Heinrich, E (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A growing body of literature identifies learning analytics as an emergent field of research that can deepen our understanding of learning and inform learning design practice. However, realizing the potential is not straightforward, as even defining learning analytics is vexed. For teachers and learning designers, the practical issue of how to engage with learning analytics data is problematic. This discussion paper begins by outlining the background to learning analytics at a practice level. Next, we introduce learning analytics frameworks, and one in particular that serves our aim to develop a guide for practitioners wishing to engage with learning analytics for different purposes. We will develop and refine the guide by mapping it to case-studies at NZ tertiary institutions, and through discussion with practitioners internationally. Our goal is to make analytics data more accessible and useful to teachers, learning designers and institutions

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  • Reusing repository technology for Cultural Heritage and Special Collections

    Knowles, CG; Shepherd, Kim; Latt, Yin Yin; Watts, Jared; Dhoble, K; Taylor, R; Renton, S; Lewis, S; Sutherland, I (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland and the University of Edinburgh will provide insights regarding the re-use of repository technology for cultural heritage and special collections. With examples of collections and observations on development and deployment of the Skylight application. The University of Auckland Library maintains a variety of digital collections, including metadata indices, bibliographies and cultural heritage collections. These collections are managed and curated in a single DSpace repository. The requirement for each collection to have its own distinct look, feel and functionality, loosely coupled to the backend repository, resulted in the development of a new application called Skylight. The University of Edinburgh’s Library and University Collections holds a diverse range of special collections from Anatomy to Zithers. The desire to adopt one solution to make disparate collections available on a managed platform with their own online identities, led to the adoption of Skylight. Reusing existing repository technology in these institutions means that staff can continue to use their current repositories, yet apply them to new and expanding numbers of collections. Utilising Solr as both a discovery layer and a metadata source means the dependencies between the UIs and backend repositories are minimised, allowing either technology to be replaced by another.

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  • From theory to practice: Using professional development to start conversations about academic and information literacy

    Dong, Linfan (2016-07-05)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quantifying passive myocardial stiffness and wall stress in heart failure patients using personalized ventricular mechanics

    Wang, Zhinuo; Wang, Yang; Bradley, Christopher; Nash, Martyn; Young, Alistair; Cao, JJ (2016-01-27)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Performance of adhesive wall-to-diaphragm connections in the Canterbury earthquakes and the subsequent experimental pull-out test program

    Dizhur, Dmytro; Schultz, A; Ingham, Jason (2013-06-02)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The connections between walls of unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings and flexible timber diaphragms are critical building components that must perform adequately before desirable earthquake response of URM buildings may be achieved. Field observations made during the initial reconnaissance and the subsequent damage surveys of clay brick URM buildings following the 2010/2011 Canterbury, New Zealand earthquakes revealed numerous cases where anchor connections joining masonry walls or parapets with roof or floor diaphragms appeared to have failed prematurely. These observations were more frequent for the case of adhesive anchor connections than for the case of through-bolt connections (i.e. anchorages having plates on the exterior façade of the masonry walls). Subsequently, an in-field test program was undertaken in an attempt to evaluate the performance of adhesive anchor connections between unreinforced clay brick URM walls and roof or floor diaphragm. The study consisted of a total of almost 400 anchor tests conducted in eleven existing URM buildings located in Christchurch, Whanganui and Auckland. Specific objectives of the study included the identification of failure modes of adhesive anchors in existing URM walls and the influence of the following variables on anchor load-displacement response: adhesive type, strength of the masonry materials (brick and mortar), anchor embedment depth, anchor rod diameter, overburden level, anchor rod type, quality of installation and the use of metal foil sleeve. In addition, the comparative performance of bent anchors (installed at an angle of minimum 22.5o to the perpendicular projection from the wall surface) and anchors positioned horizontally was investigated. Observations on the performance of wall-to-diaphragm connections in the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes and a snapshot of the performed experimental program and the test results are presented herein.

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  • Tongue Retraction in Arabic: An Ultrasound Study

    Al-Tairi, Hamed; Brown, Jason; Watson, C; Gick, B (2017-05-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A common analysis for Arabic emphatics and pharyngeals posits that their commonalities are due to the shared feature [RTR]. This, however, does not account for some phonological processes, and does not reflect their phonetic representation. This study provides ultrasound evidence that emphatics and pharyngeals do not exhibit a similar retraction of the tongue. Results indicate that while tongue retraction for the emphatics is characterized with simultaneous tongue dorsum and root retraction, the pharyngeals lower the tongue dorsum. Unlike the pharyngeals, the tongue root retraction of the emphatics and uvulars is always posterior to the tongue root position of the inter-speech posture. Such a consistent and significant displacement confirms that [RTR] is an active feature for the emphatics and uvulars. This is also evident from the retraction of following low vowels triggered by the emphatics and uvulars. These phonetic findings suggest that the pharyngeals and emphatics have different phonological representations.

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  • Across the ditch: the collective diabetic foot assessment

    Rome, K; Ihaka, B (2011-08-24)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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