303 results for Conference item, 2009

  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Between the Lines: the spirit behind land agreements

    Goodwin, David; Strack, Mick (2009)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Land agreements negotiated between British authorities and indigenous groups were part and parcel of colonial expansion. Although current interpretations of the historical agreements which formed the basis for European settlement and rights in land acknowledge that a variety of forms of evidence (written, numerical, verbal and pictorial) are admissible in law, and generally recognise that the spirit of an agreement is paramount, special difficulties (principally those of culture and language) are associated with getting to the heart of such agreements. Typically, the written words of legal texts have been scrutinised minutely, but forms of evidence other than the written words have been neglected. This paper compares the unwritten evidence for treaties and concessions in three countries, namely Canada, New Zealand and Zimbabwe. Examples include wampum belts in Canada, and surviving verbal synopses of written documents, for example explanations by missionary translators, which were often couched in figurative or metaphorical language and, at the time, may have carried considerable weight. Despite agreements being negotiated verbally, the official version is generally the written document with appended signatures or written marks. From an indigenous point of view, the verbal agreement often carries greater weight, especially when ratified by some form of cultural protocol, for example smoking a pipe of peace. Failure to recognise such verbal covenants and protocols has at times led to misunderstandings about the spirit of land agreements. The paper concludes that legal processes today not only need to be cognisant of written law but should also pay greater attention to unwritten forms of evidence. In particular, imagery resorted to at the time of negotiation has proved itself pithy, well suited to capturing the essence of negotiating points, and capable of providing enduring mental images that should rightly be drawn on to colour legal interpretation today.

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  • Bang, beep, buzz, blip: Introducing Pure Data

    Edwards, Chris (2009-07-31)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Pure Data (Pd) is a graphical data-flow environment for multimedia, created by Miller Puckette of the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts at UCSD. It’s a fun, versatile and intuitive environment providing high-level handling of audio signals, events, I/O, and 2D and 3D video. This talk will introduce the system and examine its paradigms, philosophy and architecture, with some demonstrations. I'll describe how I came to find it and what I’ve used it for so far (including some hardware hacking!), and consider other potential applications.

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  • Stranger to the Islands: voice, place and the self in Indigenous Studies

    Reilly, Michael P J (2009)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This lecture presents the views of someone anthropologists call a participant-observer, and Māori characterise as a Pākehā, a manuhiri (guest, visitor), or a tangata kē (stranger); the latter two terms contrast with the permanence of the indigenous people, the tangata whenua (people of the land). All of us in this auditorium affiliate to one of these two categories, tangata kē and tangata whenua; sometimes to both. We are all inheritors of a particular history of British colonisation that unfolded within these lands from the 1800s (a legacy that Hone Tuwhare describes as ‘Victoriana-Missionary fog hiding legalized land-rape / and gentlemen thugs’). This legalized violation undermined the hospitality and respect assumed between tangata whenua and tangata kē. Thanks to the Pākehā New Zealand passion for empire this colonial history extended to neighbouring islands, including the Cook Islands, Sāmoa, Niue and the Tokelau Islands. I hope what I will say supports a scholarship which is the work of both strangers and the people of this land; one (to adapt Anne Salmond’s vision) ‘that celebrates both our common humanity and our cultural differences, drawing strength from one without detracting from the other.’

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  • Keeping research data safe

    Stanger, Nigel (2009-10-16)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Most researchers will create or acquire numerous sets of data during their career, but the sad reality is that many of these data sets are not managed systematically. This was not such an issue when data sets were relatively small and largely paper-based, but we have now entered a world where data sets can be enormous and are often born digital. Often little thought is put into whether these data need to preserved at all, let alone how. If you have ever tried to open an old digital file, you will know the problems that can arise! And yet this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to research data management. In this seminar I discuss the issues of effectively managing research data, using real examples from around the University, and report on preliminary results from a research project in this area.

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  • Diasporic islands: Communicating Pacific cultural identities in diaspora

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Strickland, Naomi (2009-06)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper examines diasporic identities within the Pacific islands context and how these identities are communicated through different forms of diasporic media. Islands tend to be diasporic in nature and islanders shape their identities often in movement. Movements within island groups and the greater Pacific ocean, both by islanders themselves and outsiders, have enabled these islands to create complex identities that have expanded beyond their natural boundaries and into well established diasporic communities that have stimulated multifaceted and multi-trafficking communication practices within the diasporic communities themselves; between diasporic communities across the world; and between these communities and their island homes. These communication processes illustrate how these island identities are formed and/or sustained in diaspora and what impact these processes have on these identities. South Pacific island diasporas are found in NZ, Australia and the US. They have formed lively communities with distinctively diverse identities and established channels of communication, formal and informal, traditional and virtual, from the ‘coconut wireless’ to church newsletters and radio stations. This paper examines how these diasporic island communities communicate their identities through these media and how the latter contribute to the sustenance and (re) construction of cultural identities away from home. This paper is mostly based on data collected during the pilot phase of a Pacific Diaspora media project conducted in Auckland, New Zealand in 2008. The project sought to identity the available diasporic media and map its primary functions. The authors are now looking at the emerging theme of media and diasporic island cultural identities. There are increasing references to Pacific Islands communities living abroad as Pacific diasporas (i.e. Howard, 1999; Morton, 1998; Gershon, 2007; Spoonley, 2001). Spickard et al (2002) in Pacific Diaspora: Island Peoples in the United States and Across the Pacific , explore the ‘transnational or diasporic model’in examining the Pacific communities living abroad, which emphasises continuing links with their people at home or elsewhere abroad. They also explore the ‘pan-ethnicity model’ which is more pronounced among second and third generation Pacific Island migrants who are increasingly seeing themselves as Pasifika people with a new hybrid inclusive identity. The current debate is whether we now have new ethnic identities which focus on shared Polynesian descent, pan-polynesian or ‘nessian’ identities e.g. ‘New Zealand borns’, ‘P.I.’s’, ‘Polys’, or pasifikans. Also, the gradual replacement of the term Pacific Islanders with the terms Pacific people in both official and popular discourse is an acknowledgment of the fact that most Pacific descent people are no longer from the traditional island homelands, and that their commonalities derive from culture rather than place of birth. Pacific diasporic media in New Zealand has been shaped and diversified along these lines, catering as the paper demonstrates for a diverse diasporic audience.

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  • Assessing performance: What if there is no wrong and no right?

    Marshall, Steven (2009-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Performance assessing: What if there are no wrongs and no rights? What happens when you ask your students to employ fundamental theories, concepts and techniques in practice-based settings to develop their overall artistic growth through experiential exploration of the creative process? So you give them the tools to be accurate, the technique to be competent and the license to be creative! In performing and screen arts we deal on a daily basis with students working collaboratively to create work that is original and often pushes the boundaries. We find ourselves as assessors conflicted by the fact that their brief is so wide that we often struggle to categorise what we are witnessing! A rigorous approach to the performance project as a whole is the the key. This involves multiple levels of competency for the student to demonstrate throughout the whole project, connection points with supervisors, and a multi-faceted assessment structure which includes an expert panel to ensure that every student is treated as the individual that they are. In this session a panel of assessors from the department will present our take on assessing students who are allowed to copy from their peers, rely on others input to their work and where there is not always a right or a wrong.

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  • Multi-model forecasting: Using gene expression programming to develop explicit equations for rainfall-runoff modelling combinations

    Fernando, Achela; Abrahart, Robert; Shamseldin, Asaad (2009)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Two previous studies have evaluated eight multi-model forecasting strategies that combined hydrological forecasts for contrasting catchments: the River Ouse in Northern England and the Upper River Wye in Central Wales. The level and discharge inputs that were combined comprised a mixed set of independent forecasts produced using different modelling methodologies. Earlier multi-model combination approaches comprised: arithmetic-averaging, a probabilistic method in which the best model from the last time step is used to generate the current forecast, two different neural network operations, two different soft computing methodologies, a regression tree solution and instance-based learning. The nature and properties of past combination functions was not however explored and no theoretical outcome to support subsequent improvements resulted. This paper presents a pair of counterpart mathematical equations that were evolved in GeneXproTools 4.0: a powerful software package that is used to perform symbolic regression operations using gene expression programming. The results suggest that simple mathematical equations can be used to perform efficacious multi-model combinations; that similar mathematical solutions can be developed to fulfil different hydrological modelling requirements; and that the procedure involved produces mathematical outcomes that can be explained in terms of minimalist problem-solving strategies.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

    View record details
  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

    View record details
  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Our rights - whose responsibility?

    Lyons, Lesley (2009-09-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Examines key influences, tensions affecting inclusion of children with disabilities in child care centres. Juxtaposed discourses of human rights and neo-liberalism examined as influential in the access and engagement for children with disabilities

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  • This is not a Renaissance

    Harris, Aroha (2009-08-11)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the period 1945-67, Māori communities, organisations and individuals sowed the seeds for longer-lasting innovations - usually credited to a later 'Māori renaissance' - such as Māori play centres, churches and urban marae.

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  • Samoan Ergatives: Analysis and Acquisition

    Charters, Areta (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Processability Theory (PT) is a theory of language acquisition which seeks to account for the order in which syntactic structures emerge in the spontaneous speech of learners in terms of the relative processing demands of different structures (Pienemann, 1998, 2005), as predicted by structural analysis in the formal framework of LFG (Bresnan, 1982, 2001). To date, PT has been applied primarily to Nominative-Accusative languages of Indo-European origins. This paper reports on an analysis of data from child speakers of an Ergative Austronesian language, Samoan in the framework of LFG.

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  • Learning to Think as an Effective Teacher: Stories of Change

    Hill, Mary; Grudnoff, Alexandra; Ell, Fiona (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Four case studies of teacher candidates reflecting on their learning during a one-year elementary teacher preparation program are presented in this proposal. The four teacher candidates were selected from a larger study where they had completed assessments of their personal mathematics content knowledge and their ability to respond to children's work. Each of the participants in this study showed interesting patterns of change on these measures which prompted further investigation through a semi-structured interview. The results address the question:How do individual teacher candidates perceive and attribute the changes that occurred during teacher preparation in their personal content knowledge and their ability to interpret children’s work and suggest next steps for learning?

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  • Consent to Online Privacy Policies.

    Toy, Alan (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Surfing the internet often results in the transfer of personal information between users of websites and the operators of those websites. This can be automatic such as the creation of logs regarding the user’s web browsing habits, or dependent on conscious acts of the user, such as posting personal photographs on an online social network. Frequently a website operator will promulgate a privacy policy regarding personal information divulged in the course of online transactions. This article will focus on one aspect of the enforceability of online privacy policies, namely the matter of consent. It will be demonstrated that contract principles are incapable of addressing this issue in this context with a sufficient degree of certainty. The concept of authorisation under data protection legislation such as the Privacy Act 1993 is a more appropriate mechanism for regulation of this issue

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  • Collaborate, innovate, change: Designing and delivering an information literacy programme to undergraduate nursing students

    Cook, Stephanie; Nielsen, Lorraine; Baker, Heather; Stewart, Lisa (2009-09-04)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The importance of information literacy in the nursing curriculum is well documented in the literature. The proliferation of information, the trend towards evidence based practice, and increasing demands for nurses to stay current with emerging research trends necessitates the ability to recognise when information is needed and a capacity to locate, evaluate and use information effectively. The objective of this project was to collaboratively design and deliver curriculum-based information literacy embedded within the nursing programme. Based upon best-practice examples and using the University of Auckland’s graduate attributes as benchmark skills, this project combined the expertise of The University Library staff (Nursing Subject Librarian and a Learning Services Librarian) and academic staff of the School of Nursing. Student-centred learning activities specifically addressed academic skills, nursing-specific competencies, and information literacy/research skills. Responsibility for the development of activities and learning opportunities was shared between the Library and School of Nursing staff based on academic, subject and learning design roles. This paper describes the first year of this project which includes components covering plagiarism and referencing, evaluating websites, academic reading and writing, library catalogue and database searching. There will be collaborative ongoing evaluation of the project by students, academic and library staff. At this stage only interim results are available. It is planned to continue the collaboration to ensure information literacy skills are developed incrementally throughout the 3-year undergraduate nursing programme. It is envisaged that this collaborative approach will improve students’ learning and have a beneficial long term effect on their lifelong learning skills.

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  • Spatial and temporal variation in the Ecstatic Display Call of the Adélie penguin

    Marks, Emma; Rodrigo, AG; Brunton, DH (2009-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is unique amongst penguins by having two distinct display calls, the mutual display (used for individual recognition) and the Ecstatic Display Call (EDC, used for mate choice and territory defence). Although there are low rates of migration in the Adélie penguin, no geographic variation has been found in the mutual display call. However, the potential for geographic variation in the EDC has not yet been studied in detail. The possibility that the EDC possesses geographic variation because of its duality of function and its freedom from the ties of recognition was investigated in three colony areas of Ross Island, Antarctica during two breeding seasons (2000/01 and 2002/03). The stability of the call was examined across breeding seasons, between colonies and concurrently with estimates of colony breeding success. Results indicated that some call parameters (pitch, Frequency Modulation, Amplitude Modulation, entropy and total call duration) varied between Ross Island colonies and that these parameters varied with both geographical location and colony size. In conjunction with variation in call parameters, the breeding success of the colonies was predictably different; larger colonies with better access to open water and potential foraging grounds had greater success and produced chicks in better condition. The call parameter differences from Cape Bird also indicated that the parameters that separate colonies altered between breeding years. The observed variation in call parameters may be akin to variation in breeding success. The EDC whilst retaining its individuality appears remarkably changeable, and with greater study (over longer time and with more disparate colonies) has the potential to be used as an indicator of climatic and colony condition.

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