304 results for Conference item, 2009

  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Diasporic islands: Communicating Pacific cultural identities in diaspora

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Strickland, Naomi (2009-06)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper examines diasporic identities within the Pacific islands context and how these identities are communicated through different forms of diasporic media. Islands tend to be diasporic in nature and islanders shape their identities often in movement. Movements within island groups and the greater Pacific ocean, both by islanders themselves and outsiders, have enabled these islands to create complex identities that have expanded beyond their natural boundaries and into well established diasporic communities that have stimulated multifaceted and multi-trafficking communication practices within the diasporic communities themselves; between diasporic communities across the world; and between these communities and their island homes. These communication processes illustrate how these island identities are formed and/or sustained in diaspora and what impact these processes have on these identities. South Pacific island diasporas are found in NZ, Australia and the US. They have formed lively communities with distinctively diverse identities and established channels of communication, formal and informal, traditional and virtual, from the ‘coconut wireless’ to church newsletters and radio stations. This paper examines how these diasporic island communities communicate their identities through these media and how the latter contribute to the sustenance and (re) construction of cultural identities away from home. This paper is mostly based on data collected during the pilot phase of a Pacific Diaspora media project conducted in Auckland, New Zealand in 2008. The project sought to identity the available diasporic media and map its primary functions. The authors are now looking at the emerging theme of media and diasporic island cultural identities. There are increasing references to Pacific Islands communities living abroad as Pacific diasporas (i.e. Howard, 1999; Morton, 1998; Gershon, 2007; Spoonley, 2001). Spickard et al (2002) in Pacific Diaspora: Island Peoples in the United States and Across the Pacific , explore the ‘transnational or diasporic model’in examining the Pacific communities living abroad, which emphasises continuing links with their people at home or elsewhere abroad. They also explore the ‘pan-ethnicity model’ which is more pronounced among second and third generation Pacific Island migrants who are increasingly seeing themselves as Pasifika people with a new hybrid inclusive identity. The current debate is whether we now have new ethnic identities which focus on shared Polynesian descent, pan-polynesian or ‘nessian’ identities e.g. ‘New Zealand borns’, ‘P.I.’s’, ‘Polys’, or pasifikans. Also, the gradual replacement of the term Pacific Islanders with the terms Pacific people in both official and popular discourse is an acknowledgment of the fact that most Pacific descent people are no longer from the traditional island homelands, and that their commonalities derive from culture rather than place of birth. Pacific diasporic media in New Zealand has been shaped and diversified along these lines, catering as the paper demonstrates for a diverse diasporic audience.

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  • Assessing performance: What if there is no wrong and no right?

    Marshall, Steven (2009-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Performance assessing: What if there are no wrongs and no rights? What happens when you ask your students to employ fundamental theories, concepts and techniques in practice-based settings to develop their overall artistic growth through experiential exploration of the creative process? So you give them the tools to be accurate, the technique to be competent and the license to be creative! In performing and screen arts we deal on a daily basis with students working collaboratively to create work that is original and often pushes the boundaries. We find ourselves as assessors conflicted by the fact that their brief is so wide that we often struggle to categorise what we are witnessing! A rigorous approach to the performance project as a whole is the the key. This involves multiple levels of competency for the student to demonstrate throughout the whole project, connection points with supervisors, and a multi-faceted assessment structure which includes an expert panel to ensure that every student is treated as the individual that they are. In this session a panel of assessors from the department will present our take on assessing students who are allowed to copy from their peers, rely on others input to their work and where there is not always a right or a wrong.

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  • Multi-model forecasting: Using gene expression programming to develop explicit equations for rainfall-runoff modelling combinations

    Fernando, Achela; Abrahart, Robert; Shamseldin, Asaad (2009)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Two previous studies have evaluated eight multi-model forecasting strategies that combined hydrological forecasts for contrasting catchments: the River Ouse in Northern England and the Upper River Wye in Central Wales. The level and discharge inputs that were combined comprised a mixed set of independent forecasts produced using different modelling methodologies. Earlier multi-model combination approaches comprised: arithmetic-averaging, a probabilistic method in which the best model from the last time step is used to generate the current forecast, two different neural network operations, two different soft computing methodologies, a regression tree solution and instance-based learning. The nature and properties of past combination functions was not however explored and no theoretical outcome to support subsequent improvements resulted. This paper presents a pair of counterpart mathematical equations that were evolved in GeneXproTools 4.0: a powerful software package that is used to perform symbolic regression operations using gene expression programming. The results suggest that simple mathematical equations can be used to perform efficacious multi-model combinations; that similar mathematical solutions can be developed to fulfil different hydrological modelling requirements; and that the procedure involved produces mathematical outcomes that can be explained in terms of minimalist problem-solving strategies.

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

    View record details
  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

    View record details
  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Our rights - whose responsibility?

    Lyons, Lesley (2009-09-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Examines key influences, tensions affecting inclusion of children with disabilities in child care centres. Juxtaposed discourses of human rights and neo-liberalism examined as influential in the access and engagement for children with disabilities

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  • Samoan Ergatives: Analysis and Acquisition

    Charters, Areta (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Processability Theory (PT) is a theory of language acquisition which seeks to account for the order in which syntactic structures emerge in the spontaneous speech of learners in terms of the relative processing demands of different structures (Pienemann, 1998, 2005), as predicted by structural analysis in the formal framework of LFG (Bresnan, 1982, 2001). To date, PT has been applied primarily to Nominative-Accusative languages of Indo-European origins. This paper reports on an analysis of data from child speakers of an Ergative Austronesian language, Samoan in the framework of LFG.

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  • ePortfolio strategies for the university sector

    Gunn, Cathy (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Increased focus on learner centred design and personalized forms of learning are national and institutional strategic aims supported by advances in technology and associated learning design opportunities. ePortfolios are a significant strand of development in this area, as experience of their use across the disciplines expands, and suitable software systems mature and become widely accessible. The prospects are good, according to high profile publications such as Stefani, Mason and Pegler’s book, The educational potential of ePortfolios (2007), and the UK Higher Education Funding Council (HEFCE) Effective practice with ePortfolios (2008). The Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) sponsored Australian ePortfolio project (AeP) found that the concept of the ePortfolio is still under development in the national context, and identified opportunities to share and further develop experience across the sector as a key contributing factor.

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  • Effects of a 'western' diet on maternal metabolism and fetal development in rats.

    Gray, Clint; Symonds, M; Gardiner, S; Gardner, D (2009-09-29)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Do we have to leave our languages at the gate?

    Harvey, Nola; Tuafuti, P (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Research Repository Case Studies

    Hayes, Leonie; Morgan, Teula; Ruthven, Tom (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/ A Research Repository Managers Symposium invites managers to submit a “Case Study” outlining the way that their institution has decided to deliver the requirements for ERA – Excellence in Research for Australia and PBRF Performance‐Based Research Fund in New Zealand. The symposium session asks authors of the case studies to briefly share their case studies, followed by a guided discussion session determined by participants. The Case Studies will be compiled into a comprehensive document for public distribution via the Educause Australasia 2009 Conference site. For other similar Case Studies see the ones compiled by Open Repositories 2008 Conference in the UK http://pubs.or08.ecs.soton.ac.uk/86/ The focus of this symposium is how Research Repositories support tertiary institutions in delivering Research Data Collection in Australia and New Zealand. Themes and information to address in the Case Study would be Institutional overview Models – comment on your institutional model based on the Arrow HERDC report http://www.arrow.edu.au/docs/files/arrow-herdc-workinggroupreport.pdf Institutional Embedding and Innovative Practices Relationships with Research Management Systems Sustainability Outreach, Marketing and Faculty Engagement Technical Environment and Information Technology strategies Lessons learned and Future Plans.

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  • Loss leading as an Exploitative Practice [Rev. 2011]

    Chen, Zhijun (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    We show that large retailers, competing with smaller stores that carry a narrower range, can exercise market power by pricing below cost some of the products also offered by the smaller rivals, in order to discriminate multi-stop shoppers from onestop shoppers. Loss leading thus appears as an exploitative device rather than as an exclusionary instrument, although it hurts the smaller rivals as well; banning below-cost pricing increases consumer surplus, rivals’ profits, and social welfare. Our insights extend to industries where established firms compete with entrants offering fewer products. They also apply to complementary products such as platforms and applications.

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  • Banks and SMEs: A Legal Perspective

    Hare, Christopher (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A push-pull resonant converter with dual coils for Transcutaneous Energy Transfer systems

    Wu, H; Hu, AP; Budgett, DM; Tang, C; Malpas, SC (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a compact push-pull current-fed parallel resonant converter suitable for implementing a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission (TET) system to power heart assist devices. The new circuit topology integrates all three magnetic components of a conventional current-fed push-pull resonant converter including the DC inductor, phase splitting transformer and primary coil inductor into a coreless dual primary coil configuration, which significantly reduces the size and weight of the system. A stroboscopic mapping model is developed and used to analyse the circuit performance. Experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed converter performs very well and can achieve a DC to AC power efficiency of 90.5% at an output power of 10 W.

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  • New Bis-porphyrin Hosts for Fullerene Binding

    Boyd, Peter; jones, L; Lyons, D; Paauwe, JD; Robinson, I (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Calix[4]arene linked bis porphyrin hosts, 1, have been designed as hosts for fullerenes. Association constants for fullerenes varies with porphyrin substituent, solvent and fullerene type. 1 The intrinsic strength of binding due to the porphyrin-fullerene interaction is enhanced by additional porphyrin C-H..fullerene interactions.

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  • Student-centred success in the music studio environment: improving indigenous and minority student success in degree-level studies

    Rakena, TO; Airini, B; Brown, DS; O'Shea, M; Tarawa, M (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    'Success for All' is a two-year evidence-based project that targets indigenous New Zealand (Maori) student success and minority (Pasifika) student success in New Zealand degree-level education. The team is interested in increasing rates of success by investigating the ways in which non-lecture teaching and learning helps or hinders student success in degree-level studies. This paper will focus on one faculty that includes the Schools of Music, Dance, Fine Arts, Architecture and Planning. The learning environment explored in this faculty is studio-based learning. The paper will contextualise the studio learning environment and describe the collection and analysis of student narratives. The paper will highlight data collected from the School of Music. Good practice will be identified and the integration of indigenous (Kaupapa Maori Research) and minority (Pasifika Research) methodologies and methods will be discussed.

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