423 results for Conference item, 2010

  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

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  • ICT4D: A model for engagement with indigenous communities for ICT-enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Technology implementations in remote areas of South America, and, for that matter, other parts of the developing world have had limited success or final benefit for the recipients. In one particular case in the remote Peruvian Andes, a New Zealand team engaged with the local population to form an approach for rolling out the Internet with the result being one of the highest uptakes of technology in Peru and a huge benefit for the recipient communities. The approach, or method, developed for the project has been called “Community Centric Empowerment” (CCE). This paper outlines the reasons for the development of the methodology, describes its elements and how it was applied in the implementation of technology in the developing world.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • Electrical Resistance Tomography for monitoring and control in milk powder processing

    Sharifi, Mohadeseh; Young, B (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effects of parent involvement in school-based preschool education.

    Widdowson, DAM; Dixon, Robyn (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study evaluated the outcomes for 300 children from low socio-economic communities who participated in a school-based educational preschool program in which parents participate with their children (Parent Mentoring Playgroup), other preschool education program, or no preschool education. Based on a mixed methods design, participation in the Playgroup was associated with higher literacy achievement, more positive attitudes to learning, and higher school transition ratings than the other two groups of children one year after school entry. Differences found could not be attributed to mother’s level of educational achievement. Qualitative analysis of data from parents, principals and teachers supported these findings. Overall, findings support the benefits of parent involvement in school-based educational preschool programs for low socio-economic families.

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  • Wireless transmission measurement of steel bridge by using local excitation method (LEM)

    Oshima, T; Mikami, S; Miyamori, Y; Yamazaki, T; Beskhyroun, Sherif (2010-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Local excitation method (LEM) on steel structure by using piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a damage detection method. Small damages of a steel railway bridge structure like crack and slit can be detected its location by measuring local vibration measurement and PSD (power spectral density) analysis over array sensing data for each acceleration measurement points. Reliability of damage detection by this method for steel structure is evaluated as results of damage location analysis method. The analysis is using PSD and difference of PSD before and after the occurrence of damage, and it is a measure of change of structural condition. It is shown that the result of this difference on each measuring point of sensors of the structure is stable even the structural condition was changed. Remote monitoring measurement needs wireless transmission of the data from bridge site to monitoring site. Portable wireless transmission system to send a saved data of measured acceleration by using LEM is tested and applicability of this method is investigated. It is shown that LEM measurement on remote steel structure is a new monitoring method to be able to monitor damages of the structure. This research was done as an international collaboration project supported by JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) and NSF of United States of America.

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  • Batch Metadata Editing: a tutorial workshop

    Hayes, L; Lewis, S; Newton-Wade, V (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A new feature of the DSpace 1.6 Software is “Batch Metadata Editing”. It gives Repository staff the ability to export metadata and change it easily for re-upload into the system. Once you try this “Data Entry” will never be the same. A community, collection or individual item is exported in CSV format and using Spreadsheet software like Open Office Calc or Excel records are imported into a spreadsheet. Records can be edited, standardised and enhanced. Fields can be deleted and records moved into other collections. It is also possible to add metadata skeleton records if you do not have files to upload. No specialist programming or DBA resources are required, just the ability to use a spreadsheet and pay close attention to detail. It can be a quick and simple process if you have small batches of data, or a major enhancement exercise. This workshop will outline the sequence of steps to ensure you don’t wreak havoc with your data. We will have a cloud instance of DSpace available for workshop participants.

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  • Mangere Mountain: community organising/ education and the terrors of performativity

    Jesson, Jocelyn (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation considers both some of the recent history and the pre- history of a community project aimed at creating a ‘living museum’ at an important historical site in Auckland. I unpack the tensions of co-operative ventures between local Maori and interested pakeha institutions. The museum project recognised that ventures need to be iwi-determined, and thus would be assured to meet the aspirations of the local people Waiohua. As an advisor in this project, I describe some of the mainly informal learning situations I was party to, as the project unfolded and the emphasis shifted from a dream, to the creation of self- employed business or SME' with required outcomes. I conclude with a brief discussion of the ‘enterprise culture’, the employment issues for environmental and community volunteers and the tradition of broader engagement.

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  • Ngā Whiri Kawe

    Dunphy, C; Hema, G; Collings, Melanie (2010-10-05)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Tuākana enhances the learning environment for Maori and Pasifika students at the University of Auckland, through a mix of tutoring and mentoring. Each Tuākana-affiliated program has been contextualised to meet the needs of the individual faculties and departments. The role of Tuākana is to complement the university environment for Māori and Pacific students. Ako (reciprocity) is one of the key values underlying Tuākana and is essentially about an older more experienced student (tuākana) assisting a younger less experienced student (teina) to enhance their academic success at the UoA. Both the tuākana and teina gain from the experience. With regard to the theme of this conference, mokomokorea, the reciprocal nature of Tuākana sees tutors and mentors leaving a mark on their teina thus better preparing teina to leave their mark on the world. This paper will discuss how Tuākana has been effective for Māori and Pasifika students, discuss the values underlying Tuākana and identify how Tuākana contributes to Māori and Pasifika students enjoying success as Māori and Pasifika students. A case study of Tuākana in Biological Sciences will also be presented.

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  • Computable Limit Models

    Gavryushkin, Alexander (2010-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the paper we construct a complete theory having exactly 6 countable models up to isomorphism, such that there are two limit over a powerful type models, one of which has a computable presentation, and the other does not.

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  • The Bootstrap in Threshold Regression

    Yu, Ping (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper shows that the nonparametric bootstrap is inconsistent, and the parametric bootstrap is consistent for inference of the threshold point in discontinuous threshold regression. An interesting phenomenon is that the asymptotic nonparametric bootstrap distribution of the threshold point is discrete and depends on the sampling path of the original data. The remedies to the nonparametric bootstrap failure in the literature are summarized.

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  • Oral anti-oxidant use for male partners of couples undergoing fertility treatments

    Showell, MG; Brown, J; Yazdani, A; Stankiewicz, MT; Hart, RJ (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Between 30%-80% of male subfertility cases are considered to be due to the damaging effects of oxidative stress on sperm. Oral supplementation with antioxidants may improve sperm quality by reducing oxidative stress. This Cochrane review aimed to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with antioxidants on male partners of couples attending a fertility clinic. Materials and Methods: All RCTs of oral antioxidant supplements in men were searched in the following sources: the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Register, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO and AMED databases (from their inception until January 2010), trial registers, unpublished literature, reference lists and experts in the field. RCTs comparing any type or dose of antioxidant (single or combined) versus placebo, no treatment or another antioxidant that were taken by the male partner of a couple seeking fertility assistance were included. The outcomes were live birth, pregnancy, miscarriage, or spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, level of sperm DNA damage, sperm motility, sperm concentration and adverse effects. We performed statistical meta-analyses in accordance with the guidelines developed by The Cochrane Collaboration for the effect of antioxidant/s versus placebo per couple randomised. Results: Fifty trials were considered and 32 met the inclusion criteria. 2696 couples in total.

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  • Examining the efficacy of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to understand pre-service teachers’ intention to use technology

    Teo, Timothy; Lee, CB (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examined pre-service teachers’ self-reported intention to use technology by employing the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as the research framework. One hundred and fifty-seven participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to four constructs in the TPB. These were administered at the beginning of the course in which technology was taught and used. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used as the technique for data analysis. The results of this study showed that attitudes toward usage and subjective norms were significant predictors of behavioral intention to use technology while perceived behavioral control was not. Overall, this study found that the three explanatory variables in the TPB explained about 40% of the variance in behavioral intention to use technology.

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  • Efficiency and fuel switching in Norway and New Zealand's residential electricity sector during droughts

    van Campen, Bart (2010-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much demand side response work focuses either on long-term efficiency (in light of long-term energy price changes); or on short-term peak demand management, which has come to the forefront in recent years as generation and transmission over-capacity have diminished and markets have shown correspondingly high price signals for peak capacity (often in line with electricity market deregulation). New, cheaper ‘smart metering’ technologies offer new opportunities in the latter area for smaller users. Hydro-dominated electricity markets often share a comm on characteristic of low (historical) electricity prices (and therefore low historical attention to electricity efficiency) and less problems with meeting peak demand due to short-term flexibility of hydro generatio n capacity. However, they also share a recurrence of energy shortages due to droughts. Demand reduction in these periods can be very useful in reducing the chance of dry year shortages or reducing the need for dry year back-up capacity, but falls between the time-frames of long-term efficiency investment s and short peak demand management and therefore often requires different technologies and management mechanisms. It seems that this ‘time-frame’ of demand side management is understudied. The present research compares experiences in two hydro-electric markets in Norway and New Zealand, which share many similarities. It specifically focuses on demand side management in the residential sector during droughts in both countries, the potential and the methods for demand reduction. An explicit aim of presenting this research at the 1 st IAEE global conference in Rio is to ascertain whether data and interest can be harnessed to expand similar research in Latin America, where the majority of global hydro-electric markets exist. Experiences from differ ent jurisdictions might provide valuable lessons.

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  • Automatic reading of Kamars for heat detection in dairy herds

    Hempstalk, K; Harris, BL; Lopdell, Thomas (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Most existing heat detection systems for dairy cattle are labour-intensive requiring manual inspection of every animal to maximise submission rates. Our solution is to automate heat detection using Kamar HeatMount Detectors and a camera-based recognition system. The goal of our system is to obtain 99% sensitivity and specificity, ensuring that cows that are on heat are rarely missed and over-drafts are kept to a minimum. Trials of various camera prototypes have been undertaken over the past three years, most recently during the artificial breeding period in the Spring of 2009. Over 70,000 images from four farms were taken during the latest trials; these photographs were used to assess the system. When considering photo observations, the fully automated system had an error rate less than 1% across all sites in the latest trial, and reaches our goal of 99% sensitivity and specificity.

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  • Update on FieldML 0.2

    Britten, Randall (2010-02-26)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Update on the status of FieldML standard version 0.2 and FieldML API, based on design prior to release.

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  • A mechanicochemical model of the roles of TGFβ and tissue tension in dermal wound healing

    Murphy, Kelly; Hall, CL; McCue, SW; McElwain, DLS (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The repair of dermal tissue involves a complex process of interconnected phenomena, where cellular, chemical and mechanical aspects all play a role, both in an autocrine and paracrine fashion. Recent experimental results have shown that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tissue mechanics play roles in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and production of extracellular materials. We have developed a mathematical model that considers the interaction between the cellular, chemical and mechanical phenomena, allowing the combination of TGFβ and tissue stress to inform the activation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as well as incorporating the observed feature of residual stress and zero-stress states into the formulation for effective strain. Simulations of the system demonstrated that the prolonged presence of TGFβ delayed normal healing by decreasing the local fibroblast density by transforming fibroblast to myofibroblasts. Ensuring there was an influx of fibroblasts to compensate for those lost via differentiation to myofibroblasts was able to rescue normal healing. In addition, under these conditions the continued presence of TGFβ was predicted to produce contractures due to the persistence of myofibroblasts, as well as dense collagenous or hypertrophic scarring. Furthermore, early elimination of TGFβ resulted in an increase in wound size.

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  • The Global Credit Crisis and the Trans-Tasman Regime

    Hare, Christopher (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The global credit crisis that has ravaged the economies of developed nations since late 2007 has had a number of dramatic consequences, including an increase in the number of corporate insolvencies, the dramatic failure of banks and finance companies, and the amount of litigation arising out of failed construction projects and other commercial undertakings. Although comparatively unscathed when one looks at the United Kingdom, the United States, or Japan, New Zealand (like Australia) has not completely escaped the taint of corporate scandal, such as the debacles surrounding Blue Chip, Hanover Finance, and Bridgecorp. One particular feature of these various scandals was the extent to which directors and those responsible for the corporate failures were able to use other jurisdictions (particularly Australia) as a “bolt-hole” to avoid the criminal, regulatory, or civil consequences of their actions. The purpose of the article is to examine the advances that have been made in trans-Tasman co-operation in recent years, and particularly following the “credit crunch”, in the areas of private international law, insolvency law, securities regulation, and director disqualification to either address (or ameliorate) some of the problems that have arisen out of the recent corporate scandals. The first part of the paper will examine the developments in the area of civil judicial co-operation, particularly in the areas of service of civil process, staying of proceedings, and the mutual recognition and enforcement of judgments pursuant to the terms of the Agreement on Trans-Tasman Court Proceedings and Regulatory Enforcement 2008 (and its implementing legislation). The paper will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the developing trans-Tasman “single judicial area” and draw comparisons with the Brussels I Regulation scheme that operates in the same areas within the European Union. In particular, the paper will examine some of the problems that have arisen under the Brussels regime (such as the use of jurisdiction and arbitration agreements, the forum non conveniens doctrine and anti-suit injunctions within a harmonized regime) and consider the extent to which those (or new) problems are also likely to arise in the trans-Tasman regime. The second part of the paper will then examine other initiatives that have either been designed to deal with the trans-Tasman issues arising out of the global credit crisis or that may be used to assist in that area. In this regard, the paper will examine recent initiatives in the area of securities regulation (such as the mutual recognition of securities offerings under the Corporations (NZ Closer Economic Relations) and Other Legislation Amendment Act 2007 (Cth)); the disqualification of directors (such as the mutual recognition of director disqualification orders under the Corporations Amendment (No.1) Act 2009 (Cth) and Corporations Amendment Regulations (No.2) (Cth)); and corporate insolvency (such as the development of a uniform regime for cross-border insolvency under the Insolvency (Cross-border) Act 2006 (NZ) and Cross-Border Insolvency Act 2008). Other areas of recent development, such as the regulation of banks and finance companies, may also be discussed. The paper will conclude that these initiatives are likely to contribute in a positive way to the post-“credit crunch” legal and business environment in Australia and New Zealand, but that, as many of the initiatives were already underway or in place before the full ramifications of the credit crisis became clear, the degree of co-operation in a number of areas may need to be further deepened.

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  • On the Subject of Samoan: an absolutive answer

    Charters, Areta (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    On the Subject of Samoan: an absolutive answer Samoan is known to have ergative case-marking, but the identification of the syntactic Subject in Samoan is a matter of dispute. On the basis of ellipsis in co-ordinated clauses Mosel and Hovdhaugen (1992) argue that Samoan has neither an A-S nor an O-S pivot and ‘neither the absolutive argument nor the ergative argument represents a grammaticalised topic’ (Mosel and Hovdhaugen, 1992:705). This amounts to saying that Samoan has no syntactic Subject. On the other hand, Cook (1991) claims that a wider range of data – derived from Keenan’s tests for Subjecthood (Keenan, 1976) - indicate that Samoan is syntactically accusative, and the NP closest to the verb is the Subject regardless of its case-marking. This paper reviews the same tests in the light of Manning (1996) who divides Keenan’s tests into those that reflect semantic subjecthood and those that reflect syntactic subjecthood. It concludes that Samoan is syntactically ergative and identifies the absolutive argument as the Subject. It then shows how LFG’s Lexical Mapping Theory (Bresnan, 2001) can account simply for the mapping of the Subject GF to a variety of thematic roles in the various valency alternations for each of the Samoan verb classes proposed by Mosel and Hovdhaugen (1992). Bresnan, Joan. 2001. Lexical Functional Syntax. Blackwell Textbooks in Linguistics. Malden, Mass: Blackwell. Cook, K. W. 1991. The search for subject in Samoan. In R. Blust (Ed.), Currents in Pacific Linguistics: papers on Austronesian languages and ethno-linguistics in honour of George W. Grace, Pacific Linguistics, C-117, 77-98. Canberra: Research School of Pacific Studies, A.N.U. Keenan, E. L. 1976. Towards a Universal definition of “subject” In Charles N. Li (Ed) Subject and Topic ,303-333 New York: Academic Press. Manning, Christopher D. 1996. Ergativity: Argument Structure and Grammatical Relations Dissertations in Linguistics. Stanford, California: CSLI Publications Mosel, Ulrike and Even Hovdhaugen. 1992. Samoan Reference Grammar. Oslo: Scandinavian University Press.

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  • Surface modification to reduce dairy fouling

    Patel, Jaiminkumar; Jones, MI; Hyland, M; Bansal, B (2010-03-22)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Surface modification, for example through the application of a surface coating, potentially provides a solution to mitigate fouling and/or improve cleaning in a number of industrial applications. Such surface modification may alter one or more surface properties including surface roughness, surface free energy, wettability and surface charge. It is expected that altering these surface properties may influence the deposit adhesion and fouling deposition behaviour. The literature suggests that lowering of surface energy promotes reduction in fouling deposits. However conflicting results have been reported for hydrophobic surfaces. This study aims to investigate and clarify this apparent contradiction through the assessment of fouling on modified surfaces for use in the dairy industry. Stainless steel surfaces were modified by the deposition of doped Diamond-like Carbon Films (DLC). The fouling behaviour of the coated surfaces in contact with milk was investigated using a laboratory scale Flow Tube and Disk Fouling Rig. All modified surfaces were observed to result in about 15 % less in fouling deposit weight in comparison with the non-coated surface.

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