423 results for Conference item, 2010

  • Design for airtightness and moisture control in New Zealand housing

    Leardini, Paola; van Raamsdonk, T (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The analysis of the existing housing stock in New Zealand confirms the prevalence of indoor environmental factors negatively affecting occupant well-being. Besides being energy-consuming, New Zealand homes are known for having cold, damp and uncomfortable interiors. Furthermore, the country has one of the highest incidences of asthma and respiratory related illnesses in the developed world as well as one of the highest rates of winter related deaths. Design issues and practical solutions for sustainable buildings in relation to construction details,ventilation and humidity control have been already investigated in several studies. This paper instead aims to demonstrate how comfortable and healthy houses are defined by measurable conditions that can be assessed by using specific tools, such as the simulation programme WUFI (Wärme und Feuchte instationär - Transient Heat and Moisture) and Blower Door tests. It has been proved that Indoor Air Quality of homes significantly affects comfort and health of their occupants. In particular, air leakages have been identified as one of the major causes of energy consumption and discomfort in the building industry. Indeed, airtightness is a crucial factor to ensure that insulation really does perform and that the building structure remains free of structural damage. Current building practice in New Zealand suffers from the lack of use of control tools to design and build energy efficient, durable and healthy buildings. This paper presents the calculative assessment through WUFI simulations of thermal and hygric processes in the external wall assemble of old, retrofitted and new buildings. In addition it compares results from previous airtightness measurements with those from Blower Door tests performed on some modern buildings, to investigate the levels of airtightness currently being achieved in New Zealand with common building practice. The proposed calculation and assessment methods can assist practitioners in providing a general evaluation of the hygrothermal suitability of particular building components. Used as a means of verification in this study, they served to demonstrate the inadequacy and potential risks associated with certain practices of building construction and renovation

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  • Perception of Other People’s Emotions

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper I argue that one of the functions of the perceptual system is to detect other people's emotions when they are expressed in the face. I support this view by developing two separate but interdependent accounts. The first says that facial expressions of emotions carry information about the emotions that produced them, and about some of their properties. The second says that the visual system functions to extract the information that expressions carry about emotions.

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  • Building a 1.1 model in OpenCell

    Britten, Randall (2010-02-25)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Overview of OpenCell CellML software current status and roadmap.

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  • Essential Research Based Overview of Policies & Pedagogies for Bilingual /Immersion Education:A Personal View of Some Aspects of the Aotearoa/New Zealand and Pacific Experience.

    McCaffery, John (2010-10-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Effective Pedagogy for Bilingual/ Immersion Education While much has been written about the advantages of being bilingual and of Bilingual Education programmes , little has been presented about the specific pedagogies (principled theorised practices) which might ensure it works well in a range of settings. Using the Aotearoa/New Zealand bilingual /immersion education experience with Maori and Pacific and work from the Pacific islands themselves, this paper presents key ideas from emerging previously unpublished research which may be of significant pedagogical importance and work well in a range of Pacific settings .

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  • Within-time-ness and historical time

    Linzey, Michael (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The term within-time-ness refers to Martin Heidegger's phenomenological Interpretation of history and historicality. In Being and Time within-time-ness reconstructs that "moment of vision" in which a work of architecture first becomes present and meaningful as what it is. But we can interpret "the time of a work" simply by dating it in reference to major and minor movements of architectural history, such as the classical period, or modernity. Both ways of treating history - as within-time-ness and as historical time in reference to exogenous movements - are valid. But Heidegger warns that when discourse addresses beings exclusively in exogenous terms it is inclined to forget about Being. The paper argues that Tshumi and Photiadis's new Acropolis Museum in Athens comprises in part an imaginative and dramatic reenactment of the within-time-ness experience of the Parthenon.

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  • What technological knowledge do pre-service student teachers need?

    Patterson, Moira (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    What technological knowledge do pre service student teachers need to be able to teach technology? This is a question being examined by a group of lecturers at the Faculty of Education, Auckland University as part of a longitudinal study. The amalgamation of the Auckland College of Education (ACE) with the University of Auckland exposed pre-service primary students entering the Bachelor of Education programme to many changes regarding the delivery of technology education at the Faculty of Education. This paper examines pre-service primary student teachers responses over a number of years to the one compulsory technology education course taught as part of the present Bachelor of Education programme. It examines responses gathered as part of a longitudinal study; discusses changes made to this course in response to student evaluations collected over a number of years; identifies what technological knowledge pre-service teachers think they need to teach technology and finally suggests implications for teaching technology education in the tertiary sector in the future.

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  • Connected Lender Liability in New Zealand

    Hare, Christopher (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Courts have long struggled to identify those circumstances when one legal actor should bear legal responsibility, and accordingly be vicarious liability (usually on a joint and several basis), for the legal, equitable, or statutory wrongs of another. At common law, there exist well-established situations in which this can occur (most notably in the employer-employee context), even though the scope and justification for these situations has not always received universal endorsement. The purpose of this paper is to consider a related legal principle, namely that of ‘connected lender liability’. According to this principle, a bank (or other financier) may be liable to a borrower for the actions of a third party supplier or service-provider if those actions constitute a breach of the supply contract that the bank has agreed to finance, or alternatively constitute a legal or equitable wrong committed in connection with the formation or performance of that agreement. Not only has this principle and its justifications been considered recently by the House of Lords in Office of Fair Trading v Lloyds TSB Bank plc, but it has also been recently adopted by the European Union in the Consumer Credit Directive 2008 and is currently under review in both Australia and the United States following the global “credit crunch”. In contrast, ‘connected lender liability’ has received virtually no judicial or academic attention in New Zealand. The paper will not only examine the justifications for ‘connected lender liability’, but will also analyse the extent to which this principle is recognized (whether at common law or by statute) in New Zealand. Whilst the analysis will consider the extent to which ‘connected lender liability’ arises out of the provision of consumer finance generally in New Zealand, it will focus in particular on the extent to which such liability can arise out of the most common form of consumer finance, namely credit card financing.

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  • Where do I fit? Trying on the National standards: The possible impact on the literacies of children, teachers, family and whanau.

    Harvey, Nola (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Qualitas Corpus: A Curated Collection of Java Code for Empirical Studies

    Tempero, E; Anslow, C; Dietrich, J; Han, T; Li, J; Lumpe, M; Melton, H; Noble, J (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to increase our ability to use measurement to support software development practise we need to do more analysis of code. However, empirical studies of code are expensive and their results are difficult to compare. We describe the Qualitas Corpus, a large curated collection of open source Java systems. The corpus reduces the cost of performing large empirical studies of code and supports comparison of measurements of the same artifacts. We discuss its design, organisation, and issues associated with its development.

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  • Eportfolios - brave new words

    Marsh, Brian (2010-10)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Helen Barrett (2009), a pioneer in this area, describes the ePortfolio as a process of learning through to a showcase product, which involves a social community as well as individual expression. The resultant product represents a documentation of the students 'story' of learning as well as achievement. The real value of an e-portfolio is in the documentation of students' reflections as linked to evidence of their practice, as well as an ongoing record of the Students' learning journey, rather than just a showcase collection of work. According to Nickel (2006) students require guidance to take full advantage of the potential learning experience an ePortfolio offers. This presentation will look at the experience of the introduction of e-portfolios in a one-year graduate diploma programme at the University of Auckland, and seek to draw parallels between the implementation experience and the literature. Reference will also be made to Stefani, Mason and Pegler's (2007) argument that, when discussing the topic of preparing users to use the ePortfolio, educational institutions must assume responsibility for creating independent learners who will be able to learn not only within the confines of the institution but in their workplace, their social environment and throughout their lives. The experience to date of project participants confirms that students require guidance to take full advantage of the learning potential that an ePortfolio offers and, consequently, that staff need training in the use of the wider pedagogical approaches required to guide the successful implementation of student ePortfolios.

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  • What lecturers really require: An analysis of essay writing tasks at undergraduate level.

    White, Martin (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper reports the results of a survey which analysed and classified essay writing assignments drawn from a wide variety of courses at undergraduate level at the University of Auckland. For the survey, one academic writing class was examined to find out what mainstream courses the students were enrolled in for that semester and what writing they were required to do in those other subjects to complete course assignments. The principal source of information for this survey was a range of actual course assignment tasks collected from course coordinators. Surveys of writing tasks are important as an aid to curriculum design and ensuring that academic writing courses are relevant and useful to those taking them. This paper focuses on the essay as it is a widely used form of assessment. The resulting classification scheme is presented and compared with the treatment of essay writing in several widely used academic writing textbooks.

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  • Ethical Decision-making in Palliative Care

    Kovach, Vanya (2010-11)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    An overview and commentary on the use and limits of ethical decision-making guides in palliative care.

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  • On "Respect for Others" in the Community of Inquiry

    Kovach, Vanya (2010-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    There are many different notions of respect described in philosophical literature. In this paper I identify which of these are appropriate for participants in a philosophical community of inquiry, and also propose a novel notion of respect that arises for consideration of this context.

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  • Debt and Deficit Fluctuations in the Time-Consistent Setup

    Grechyna, Daryna (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper considers the implications of optimal taxation for the stochastic behaviour of debt and defi cit in the economy with discretionary government, focusing on Markov perfect equilibria. It concludes that in such time-consistent setup in case of market incompleteness the properties of the variables are very similar to those in the full commitment case. Moreover, debt shows more persistence than other variables and it increases in response to shocks that cause a higher de cit, which is in accordance with empirical evidence from U.S. data.

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  • Explaining Public Debt Levels in the European Union

    Grechyna, Daryna (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper studies the reasons of the government debt over accumulation in some of the developed European countries. It builds a simple model relating the level of government debt to the degree of political instability in the country and the measure of corruptness of the officials, using the neoclassical growth economy framework with discretionary and non-benevolent government and focusing on Markov perfect equilibria. It shows that the fact of public corruption and political changes results in higher than optimal public debt levels, and tries to reproduce the debt-to-GDP ratios in the European Union countries as a function of the measure of public corruption in these countries. In the empirical part of the paper the assumptions and predictions of the model are tested in a panel of the European Union states.

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  • Formative assessment and feedback in first year biology courses

    Harper, Amanda (2010-11-29)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How do physics teachers perceive practical work?

    Burchill, Denis (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation outlines a small research study that interviews physics teachers about how they learned to run practical work in their classes, what they consider practical work to be, what they think students gain from practical work and the barriers that limit practical work. The study looks to make visible the range of experiences, beliefs and purposes of New Zealand physics teachers concerning practical work Results show that teachers consider practical work essential in learning physics and are often looking to find or develop new practical work tasks. Also, more experienced teachers figured significantly as mentors when a number of the teachers interviewed were learning to run practical work. Finally, participants will be invited to discuss what further research into NZ physics teaching would be valuable.

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  • Public debt levels and corruption in the high-income economies

    Grechyna, Daryna (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper proposes a possible reason for the government debt over-accumulation in some of the developed economies. It builds a simple model relating the level of government debt to the degree of corruptness of the public officials in the country, using the neoclassical economy framework with discretionary and non-benevolent government and focusing on Markov perfect equilibria. It shows, that the fact of public corruption results in higher than optimal public debt levels, and tries to reproduce the debt-to-GDP ratios in the advanced OECD countries as a function of the measure of public corruption in these countries. In the empirical part of the paper the assumptions and predictions of the model are tested in a panel of the OECD member states.

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  • Experiences with the use of a Classroom Response System (CRS) in a Chemistry Foundation Course

    Brittain, Judith; Arewgoda, CM (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland invited applications to participate in a project trialing the use of ‘personal response systems’. A chemistry course, which is a component of the Tertiary Foundation Certificate (TFC) program, participated in the trial in the second semester of 2009.

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  • Indigenous language and culture for mainstream teacher education: students' knowledge and attitudes

    Keegan, PJ; Jones, A; Brown, GTL (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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