419 results for Conference item, 2010

  • ICT4D: working with communities for ICT enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Computing student views on sustainability: a snapshot

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    UNESCO launched the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development for 2005-2014 with the aim of integrating Education doe Sustainable Development (ESD) into all aspects of education and learning. The motivation for this study was to inform our decisions on embedding ESD into our teaching. Incoming computing students (n=116) were surveyed to capture their viewd on sustaunability before they engaged in formal learning and these views were compared to those of computing students at another institution. The study explored views on the relevance of sustainability to their study, sustainability [riorities and knowledge, possible actions they could take, their capacity to take these actions and make a difference, and how they would deal with a challenging scenario. Students were pro-ecological but did not believe they had the capability to make a difference. Significant variation was found in attitudes and cvalues across the various ethnicities in our sample, suggesting that careful consideration should be given to this aspect. This study adds to the emerging body of knowledge around sustainability perceptions and values of incoming students and informs curriculum for the embedding of ESD into education and learning.

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  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

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  • Industry view of ICT roles and skills: needs in Canterbury

    Asgarkhani, M.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the ICT skills needs within both Canterbury region and New Zealand. ICTs play a crucial role in today’s knowledge-based economy. Organizations heavily rely on ICT solutions to develop and grow business. There is an increasing need for ICT skills within organizations – so as to benefit from the use of ICT tools and solutions. A focus group of industry representatives participated in this study – to identify the need for roles and skills within the ICT sector. It appears that there are consistencies in both the need for roles and the use of development platforms for the Canterbury region and all regions of New Zealand. That is to say, ICT qualifications designed to address national needs should address majority of ICT needs within the Canterbury region.

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  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

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  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

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  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

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  • The feedback loop: encouraging student submissions

    Kennedy, D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The use of a network of tablet PCs to teach a first year computing degree mathematics class has shown that students value the learning involved in seeing other student’s submissions and the teacher comments on these as well as comments on their own submissions. The lecturers value receiving responses from many of the students and not just the few who always answer. This paper discusses the use of an active learning pedagogy, student submissions, and feedback in a database class based in a standard PC computer laboratory. Instructor perceptions and student reactions to this pedagogy are discussed. Student reactions were collated from a questionnaire. In spite of many technical problems both lecturers and students reported benefits for teaching and learning.

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  • ICT4D: A model for engagement with indigenous communities for ICT-enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Technology implementations in remote areas of South America, and, for that matter, other parts of the developing world have had limited success or final benefit for the recipients. In one particular case in the remote Peruvian Andes, a New Zealand team engaged with the local population to form an approach for rolling out the Internet with the result being one of the highest uptakes of technology in Peru and a huge benefit for the recipient communities. The approach, or method, developed for the project has been called “Community Centric Empowerment” (CCE). This paper outlines the reasons for the development of the methodology, describes its elements and how it was applied in the implementation of technology in the developing world.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • Context identification of sentences in related work sections using a conditional random field: towards intelligent digital libraries

    Angrosh, M. A.; Cranefield, Stephen; Stanger, Nigel (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Identification of contexts associated with sentences is becoming increasingly necessary for developing intelligent information retrieval systems. This article describes a supervised learning mechanism employing a conditional random field (CRF) for context identification and sentence classification. Specifically, we focus on sentences in related work sections in research articles. Based on a generic rhetorical pattern, a framework for modelling the sequential flow in these sections is proposed. Adopting a generalization strategy, each of these sentences is transformed into a set of features, which forms our dataset. We distinguish between two kinds of features for each of these sentences viz., citation features and sentence features. While an overall accuracy of 96.51% is achieved by using a combination of both citation and sentence features, the use of sentence features alone yields an accuracy of 93.22%. The results also show F-Scores ranging from 0.99 to 0.90 for various classes indicating the robustness of our application.

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  • Indigenous Language Print Culture: Colonial Discourses and Indigenous Agency

    Paterson, Lachy (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    As this file is rather large it is advisable that you download the video to your computer in order to view it.

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  • Networking audio

    Edwards, Chris (2010-07-23)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    With the installation of the Music Department’s new SSL mixing console and the founding of the New Zealand Music Industry Centre (NZMiC), there are exciting new possibilities for sound production and performance at Otago, especially across digital networks. To what extent might a “distributed recording studio” be feasible, and what technical flies might await in the proverbial ointment? This talk will examine some of the capabilities of the KAREN research network for audio, discuss the possibility of using the Internet Network Time Protocol (NTP) or the Global Positioning System (GPS) to keep remote audio hardware clocks synchronised, consider the effects of network latency, and suggest some avenues for developing a software infrastructure for distributed audio work.

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  • Notions of wellbeing and interdependence embedded within ecologically sustainable early childhood pedagogies in Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2010-12-14)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Through the growing international concern regarding the impacts of environmental degradation and the depletion and exploitation of natural resources on our planet’s wellbeing, we are being challenged as individuals and educators as to how we can change our practices and pedagogies in order to replenish and protect our planet. This can be seen to require a shift away from an individualistic paradigm to one which recognises our inter-subjectivity, interdependence, inter-connectedness and inter-relatedness as planetary beings, members of a shared woven universe (Marsden, 2003). This is a worldview that has been upheld by indigenous people despite the impacts of colonisation (Cardinal, 2001; Haig-Brown & Dannenmann, 2002; J. Patterson, 2000). For the Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand, “the spiritual unity of the child with the land, with its people, and with the Universe at large is as one” (Reedy, 1995). In Western discourses also there has been growing awareness of a need to prioritise an ethic of care based in recognition of the interdependent nature of individual and collective wellbeing within our academic and professional discourses and enactment (Foucault, 1997; Gilligan, 1982; Noddings, 1995; Rinaldi, 2006). This paper reports on a New Zealand study conducted during 2008-9, which employed a synthesis of narrative and kaupapa Māori methodologies (Clandinin, 2007; L. T. Smith, 1999) to illuminate transformative early childhood discourses and pedagogies that reflect both Māori and Western ecological understandings. The focus of this study has relevance towards enacting “an ethic of global caring” generated within early years education (Said, 1993, p. 21).

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  • Visual dialogues, community action & social change: A south Pacific islands HIV/AIDS project application

    Thomas, Verena; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Eggins, Joys (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper explores the conceptual and methodological framework of the Komuniti Tok Piksa project, which is both, research project and community action initiative. Visual research tools are used within an indigenous research framework in order to study behavioural practices, perceptions and needs in regards to HIV and AIDS in Papua New Guinea. It explores the ways in which visual methods when paired with a community action approach can be used to facilitate social change and to encourage new engagements between researchers and participants.

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  • Convenient fictions? A critical communicative perspective on financial accumulation, autopoiesis and crisis in the wake of the credit crunch

    Thompson, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recent turmoil in the financial markets following the sub-prime mortgage crisis and the credit crunch has repercussions in many other spheres of society. Governments have spent trillions of taxpayer dollars propping up the banking system in order to avoid systemic financial collapse. Significant public policy questions are being raised about the sustainability of the monetarist macroeconomic paradigm and the dogmatic neoliberal faith in financial deregulation. Media discourses have included open criticism of the finance sector. However, the right of private banks to create money through the issuance of credit and the generation of fictitious values through the securitisation of anticipated future revenue remain peripheral to policy debate, even though they lie at the heart of the recent crises. Although Marx provided the seminal critique of capitalism’s internal contradictions, his work on credit-money and financial accumulation processes were never fully developed. However, the more recent work of Hyman Minsky emphasises the role of credit systems in financial markets’ endogenous tendency toward crisis. This paper proposes to extend a Marxist critique of contemporary financial crises using Minksy’s financial instability hypothesis. However, this requires emphasis on the reflexive communicative processes underpinning credit-money and fictitious financial values. In doing so, it will highlight the role of media and communication systems in accumulation regimes and the risks posed to the lifeworld as financial processes become increasingly self-referential and autopoietic.

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  • Last chance to see? Public broadcasting policy and the public sphere in New Zealand

    Thompson, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The paper presented here is intended to provide an overview of some of the themes and issues linking theoretical and policy debates on media, democracy and public sphere, and to hopefully set the scene for further debate at the conference. The first part of the paper will compare and contrast normative models of media with a particular focus on their implicit conceptions of citizenship and civil society. The second part will map the emergent themes onto the shifts in public broadcasting policy in New Zealand under the Labour-led governments between 1999-2008. This will focus on the policy tensions that surrounded the development and implementation of the TVNZ Charter (which the current government has scheduled for ignominious abolition). The third part will endeavour to extend this analysis to the emergent broadcasting policy trajectory of the current National-led government. The conclusions will highlight the continuing policy salience of the conceptions public service and public sphere in policy debates and argue that even if these models need to be adapted to the digital multimedia environment, it would be premature to dispense with them altogether.

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  • Resources and capacity: Lessons learned from post-disaster reconstruction resourcing in Indonesia, China and Australia

    Chang, Yan; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan; Seville, Erica (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Post-disaster reconstruction poses resourcing challenges specific to the construction practitioners and requires constant improvements of the construction industry and of the environment in which it operates. By drawing on in-field surveys and observations in the disaster affected areas in Indonesia, China and Australia, the research examines their respective resourcing practice following a disaster with a particular focus on identifying the resource and capacity constraints that confronted the reconstruction practitioners in a post-disaster situation. This mapping exercise helps draw attention from decision makers and the construction sector to the vulnerable areas in post-disaster reconstruction and also generates lessons and experiences worthy of adoption in other disaster situations. Practical measures are suggested to improve the implementation of physical reconstruction through laws, regulations and policies, along with the according mechanisms in the industry and at a project level.

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  • Post-disaster recovery: Multi-agency leadership and co-ordination

    Beckett, James V.; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recovery is a vital phase in an emergency management and civil defence cycle aimed towards long-term community resilience. Leadership plays a crucial role in an emergency situation, especially in the response and recovery stages. This research examines the post-disaster rural community contexts of the 2009 Victorian Bushfires to review the leadership that exists in such a complex post-disaster environment. Soft leadership and more technical, task-based management skills are combined to establish the necessary characteristics for effective disaster leadership during a post-disaster recovery. The conclusion is reached that the most effective leadership in a recovery environment combines traits targeted towards achieving the right actions with minimal delay.

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  • Architecture for humanity: Shipping containers as Swiss Army knife

    Lee, Ja Yeun; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Surplus commercial shipping containers have re-gained popularity among developed countries recently and are often associated with fashionable, prefabricated second-homes, hotels, and even cities. However, when applied in the context of post-disaster reconstruction, it takes on a new identity as a heroic, “Swiss Army Knife” equivalent of emergency shelter that offers a potential solution to transitional and permanent housing issues in post-disaster reconstruction. In 2009, the University of Auckland in collaboration with Architecture for Humanity (AfH) offered a design studio project to develop shipping containers as prefabricated cores that boil down the vital services for shelter and basic off-grid utilities into as small a package as possible. Twelve post-graduate students from the School of Architecture developed a range of ambitious prefabricated core approaches and variations for recent disasters in twelve different locations covering and in as many climates, cultures and materials. The students faced challenges unique to each situation. Shipping containers were carefully modified for deployment at emergency stage of disaster as a self-sufficient shelter, which was also made adaptable by locals to enable full integration into the urban fabric of their city over time. Local materials and labour may be used to construct structural enclosures and building envelopes, but systems for water, waste, power and ventilation require specialist expertise and non-local components. Prefabricated cores enable such technical systems to be integrated and fabricated off-site and shipped to sites where they can be plugged on-site into a larger building project. Despite the homogenous beginning of a shipping container (the “one size fits all” approach), the potential to package it with useful components make their deployment in disasters an efficient strategy for humanitarian relief work. Enabling self-sufficiency for disaster survivors from early stages of disaster expedites recovery through empowerment and stability.

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