738 results for Conference item, 2011

  • The Christchurch quake: Social networking as student support in disaster recovery

    McCarthy, D.; McCarthy, C. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Following the “Greendale Fault” Earthquake of 7.1 on 4 September, 2010 in Christchurch, New Zealand, students at the local Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) were significantly disrupted in their second semester. Occurring at 4.35am on the Saturday morning after only two weeks of courses, the ITP found itself cordoned off and part of an inner city curfew as older less well maintained buildings were reduced to rubble around it. Aftershocks continued but relatively little damage was sustained to the ITP’s buildings. Students and staff were unable to attend study or work, and the situation was rapidly changing from day to day. However, students were affected differently depending on their location at the time of the quake, their access to communication technologies such as cell phones, the Internet, and their personal circumstances. Then the entire situation repeated itself with the 6.3 “Lyttelton Fault” aftershock at 12.51pm on 22 February, 2011 disrupting Semester One on only the second day of the semester. This paper blends two qualitative methods, actor network theory (ANT) and narrative research to show the degree to which computing students accessed an online course to tell their stories, participate in social networking, and relied upon the School of Computing Moodle Student Info site in the recovery period immediately after the first disaster, and comparing this process over the “Greendale Fault” and the “Lyttelton Fault” events.

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  • Self and peer-assessment: a learner perspective

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M.; Fourie, W.; Clarkson, D.; Marais, K. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Self and peer assessment aid learning and build capabilities that support lifelong learning. However, although both involve learner participation and are often discussed together, they are very different in some respects. This study contrasts learners’ experiences of peer assessment with that of self-assessment. It used a non-experimental post-test only design in which students enrolled in courses with both self-assessment and peerassessment components completed a questionnaire on their experiences. Survey questions were formed into four scales: value, learning, contrasting peer with self and concerns. Additional questions captured basic demographics and conceptions of learning. Participants believed that they learned more from peer assessment than from self-assessment. However, some felt it was not right for other students to mark their work and some felt uncomfortable with the responsibility of marking other’s work. Learners endorsed the notion that peer-assessment has a greater learning value than self-assessment and that they should be more involved in assessing other students. However, they also had concerns about the wider use of self and peer assessment and a minority was strongly opposed to their use.

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  • The fate of computing in research performance evaluations: ERA vs PBRF

    Clear, A.; Clear, T. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The prevailing ‘audit culture’ in national governments has seen a global proliferation of research performance evaluation schemes. Most recently the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results have been published. The results from this bibliometrically based ranking exercise provide an interesting comparison with the earlier results from New Zealand’s Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) exercise. With a focus on the computing disciplines this paper sets these developments in the global context; compares the outcomes under each scheme; the extent to which the prevailing publication cultures have been supported or undermined; the scope for such schemes to render whole sub-disciplines invisible and the potential impacts for the computing disciplines from such exercises.

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  • Web-assisted learning: A review of planning and theory

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of the phase I of a research project (planning and theory of e-learning) that looks at theory of benefits and value of e-learning, planning to achieve perceived benefits and values. Phase II will compare the reality of the outcomes after implementation of e-Learning solutions versus planned outcomes. The paper covers some of the key issues web-assisted or e-learning through discussing the various stages (technologies) of e-learning solutions, potential benefits; the state of the e-learning industry; the barriers to introducing e-learning and building a model to assess strategic value of e-learning through web technologies. It concentrates on literature review, planning and theory mostly related to early 2000 when the e-learning phenomenon really emerged.

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  • Managing operational continuity in disaster recovery: A case in academic delivery

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the experience related to planning approaches that were undertaken to continue delivery of Information and Communication Technologies qualifications at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after the 22 February earthquake. It reflects on challenges, phases of planning for commencing delivery and key success factors.

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  • The preservation of Māori textiles: Collaboration, research and cultural meaning.

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Te Kanawa, Kahutoi; White, Moira (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Māori artefacts discovered in 1895 at Puketoi Station, Otago, South Island New Zealand, were re-examined using multiple methods to gather information of relevance and meaning to contemporary Māori culture. This paper discusses aspects of an interdisciplinary project including conservation treatment, plant material identification and examination of textile structure and details of cultural information thus uncovered. One artefact, the pukoro kete, or tutu-berry bag, is used as a case study to illustrate how knowledge uncovered about past material culture in collaboration with traditional owners can influence contemporary cultural practice and aid in affirmation of distinctive cultural identity.

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  • Re-examining conservation precepts; implications for conservation education

    Scott, Marcelle; Smith, Catherine Ann (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In recognising a changing social future, this paper posits that the future relevance and sustainability of conservation is dependent on a re-evaluation of our professional pre-cepts, ethics, and working practices to more fully embrace and reflect interdisciplinary and cross-cultural ways of working. It argues that conservators must locate our practice within overarching global issues of poverty, human rights, ethics, climate change and sus-tainability. The implications for conservation pedagogy are examined, and the benefits of collaboration between universities and in-dustry partners are discussed.

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  • Selecting IT control objectives and measuring IT control capital

    Singh, H (2011-08-08)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    COBIT is a well-known framework for IT governance, and provides an extensive list of control objectives for IT managers. However, anecdotal evidence shows that many organizations that use COBIT do not implement the entire framework. Instead, they focus their efforts on only some of COBIT’s control objectives. We argue that this could be due to the bounded rationality of IT managers, which affects their ability to assess the outcomes of control, and the diminishing returns from implementing controls, because of enforcement costs incurred to control shirking. Managers would thus find it useful if the various control objectives could be ranked, so that they could prioritize their efforts. We use network analysis to identify the most central control objectives in COBIT. We also discuss the development of a measure of “control capital” to capture the level of control an organization achieves after implementing a particular set of controls. Future research will test the empirical validity of this measure.

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  • Improving Persian-English statistical machine translation: experiments in domain adaption

    Mohaghegh, M; Sarrafzadeh, A; Moir, T (2011-09-06)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper documents recent work carried out for PeEn-SMT, our Statistical Machine Translation system for translation between the English-Persian language pair. We give details of our previous SMT system, and present our current development of significantly larger corpora. We explain how recent tests using much larger corpora helped to evaluate problems in parallel corpus alignment, corpus content, and how matching the domains of PeEn-SMT’s components affect translation output. We then focus on combining corpora and approaches to improve test data, showing details of experimental setup, together with a number of experiment results and comparisons between them. We show how one combination of corpora gave us a metric score outperforming Google Translate for the English-to-Persian translation. Finally, we outline areas of our intended future work, and how we plan to improve the performance of our system to achieve higher metric scores, and ultimately to provide accurate, reliable language translation.

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  • Some aspects of knowledge engineering.

    Abhary, K.; Djukic, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Kovacic, Z.; Mulcahy, D.; Spuzic, S.; Uzunovic, F. (2011)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Salient Elements in Novice Solutions to Code Writing Problems

    Whalley, JL; Clear, Tony; Robbins, P; Thompson, E (2011-07-25)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents an approach to the evaluation of novice programmers' solutions to code writing problems. The first step was the development a framework comprised of the salient elements, or programming constructs, used in a set of student solutions to three typical code writing assessment problems. This framework was then refined to provide a code quality factor framework that was compared with an analysis using the SOLO taxonomy. We found that combining our framework with the SOLO taxonomy helped to define the SOLO categories and provided an improved approach to applying the principles of SOLO to code writing problems.

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  • Effort-based re-estimation during software projects

    MacDonell, SG (2011-08-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Latest metals research outcomes at AUT University

    Neitzert, TR; Chen, Z; Pasang, T; Singamneni, S (2011-08-19)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • On two desiderata for creativity support tools

    Yeap, WK; Opas, T; Mahyar, N (2011-12-21)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper discusses two important desiderata for developing creativity support tools, namely ideation and empowerment. We then use them to guide us in designing a new individual creativity support tool codenamed Creative-Pad. Creative-Pad is designed to assist individual advertising creative to develop creative ideas for advertisements. For ideation, Creative-Pad searches and filters information automatically from the internet to present to the user with related words and exemplar sentences. For empowerment, Creative- Pad is designed in such a way that the user is neither distracted nor burdened to do any other tasks unrelated to conjuring up a creative idea for a new advertisement. Creative-Pad is fully implemented and some preliminary results of its use by advertising creatives are reported.

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  • Book Launch Speech: Ngā Mōteatea: He Kupu Arataki: An Introduction, by Jane McRae

    Reilly, Michael (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Tonight we are gathered here to celebrate the launching of the last instalment in a remarkable venture of New Zealand scholarship and publishing: the Introduction to the four volume series, Ngā Mōteatea. This Introduction fulfills the intentions of Apirana Ngata who wanted to provide readers with a “pocket edition” (p. 9) containing a song selection that might entice them on to sample more fully the diverse range of songs contained within the other volumes. That ambition, first announced in 1933, has been amply achieved in this bi-lingual work by Jane McRae and Hēni Jacob.

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  • Communicating community re-organisation in India: Selective developmental interventions in perspective

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Naqvi, Munawwar (2011-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper presents a critical perspective on communication with communities within the development efforts at the grassroots level in the Indian context. It is part of an exploratory research undertaken by one of the authors (Naqvi, M) on Non-Governmental Development Organisations’ (NGDOs) communication with their target communities in central India. The authors present two models, selective interaction and new involvement, developed from the data collected from semi-structured interviews of different types of NGDOs in Central India. They discuss conflicting ideals at play in the objectives and approaches of the ‘key players’ interacting with the community, and how these objectives are communicated to the community. The ‘key players’ include the externally funded NGDOs, the State funded NGDOs, the Elected Panchayat (governing body), the Traditional Panchayat (body of elders), and, the Target (beneficiary) Community itself. Since development interventions of NGDOs within participatory approaches establish gram sabhas or similar village level organisations comprised of individuals or groups from within the community to gain cooperation into their projects, a certain re-organisation is an inevitable part of ground NGDO’s interaction with the target community. The new structures that emerge get modified and strengthened as the project moves on, so the social, economic, and political landscape changes significantly over the duration of intervention(s). The first model Selective Interaction maps major stated objectives which affect the key players’ interaction with the community. Conflicting approaches are identified such as political agenda driven activities of the elected Panchayat; Free market, corporate culture driven activities of the externally funded NGDOs; state funded NGDO’s activities driven by compliance/control/monitoring of Government Schemes; and culture driven activities of the traditional Panchayat. Some questions are asked within the context of this model including (1) whether the agents of change (key players) recognise the consequences of developmental interventions with highly selective objectives, which may or may not be mutually compatible (2) and if they are aware, it raises further questions in the area of preparedness for the challenges emerging from this non-integrated approach evident from data. Such questions bring into focus the way communication is managed around sharing this awareness (where it exists with the agents) with the target community, how much is shared and to what end. Finally, where no such communication exists, what might be the reasons for not sharing of this awareness with the community? The key players at the grassroots level are mapped with the range of other larger players who have a visible stake in development of the community. This second model was introduced in part as the new involvement model (Naqvi, 2004) as a modification of the ‘community agency’ model (proposed by Lyons et al 2001) and adjusted to the Indian context. This model attempts to look at the larger picture and identifies (1) the ongoing or eventual isolation of certain players (2) the structural constraints on key players acting through linguistic and non-linguistic means (3) Media interest at various levels of development stakeholders, and (4) information flows Considering some of the anecdotal accounts of research interviewees, the discussion finally reflects on whether developmental interventions within the participatory development paradigm genuinely seek the integration of the local community(ies) into the global economy, or that community development is a transitory objective –the longer term objective being seamless integration of local resources into the global economy.

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  • Engaging the youth in community action: A visual methods approach to HIV & AIDS awareness

    Eggins, Joys; Thomas, Verena; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2011)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper discusses the findings of a film production project that involved youths in a remote rural community in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. It explores some of the processes and impacts of integrating a visual methods community action project in a local community context while targeting young people in an effort to engage them in a reflective dialogue on HIV/AIDS.

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  • Changing from Learning Stories to Learning Notes

    Blaiklock, Ken (2011-10-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • Perception of barriers to career progression by women engineers and engineering students

    Fernando, Achela (2011-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Although the common view that engineering is best suited for men is changing, there is anecdotal evidence suggesting gender imbalance in the engineering industry. Efforts take place throughout New Zealand to encourage participation and career progression of females in engineering. These occur through the formation and activities of societies such as Women in Engineering(WIE) in NZ Universities and provision of support by Institution of Professional Engineers of New Zealand(IPENZ). These enable networking opportunities and celebrate achievements of women engineers. However despite these, a small sample of female engineers revealed that they feel the presence of more barriers to them than for their male counterparts to be able to accomplish in the profession. This in turn may discourage prospective students who value a good balance between their role as an engineer, mother and a home-maker. A survey was conducted to assess the perception by female engineers/engineering students of these barriers, and how prepared the engineering industries/educational institutes are to cater for the specific needs of a woman as she progresses through the career, balancing the familial responsibilities. Based on findings some measures are proposed to encourage female participation and retention in engineering industry; implementing them can be invaluable in preventing the loss of highly skilled engineers to the industry especially when a young female engineer chooses family over engineering work – either by changing her career path to obtain more flexible working conditions or by stopping work all together. Both of these scenarios are equally detrimental to the individual and the industry.

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  • Growth and diversification of mass media in India: Whose interests, whose ideas?

    Naqvi, Munawwar (2011-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper compares two distinct perspectives on the growth of mass media in India. On the one hand we have the institutional and business perspective commonly employed in the assessment of the growth and diversification of print, electronic, and online media. This perspective asserts itself in the media discourse measuring the growth in revenues of mass media, media diversity, consumption of media products, popularity and penetration of various types of content and the like. On the other hand there is the development communication perspective, which is dominated by the political economic critique questioning the benefits the development and diversification of mass media has delivered to the masses. An ongoing research on ‘NGDO perception of their relationship with their stakeholders’ conducted by the author of this paper, addresses this aspect. Preliminary findings with respect to NGDO interaction with mass media suggest that the appearance of ‘development news’ in mainstream media can largely be traced as the history of repeated press releases and other efforts made by the NGDOs. Respondent NGDOs also acknowledge that it is essential for them to get press coverage because it enhances NGO profile which in turn helps securing funding opportunities for their programmes and development interventions in the community. Although, the hard found positioning in the news may be advantageous for NGDOs’ institutional development, it does lend itself to criticism whether it actually translates into a tangible and sustainable gain for the beneficiary communities serviced by these NGDOs—for instance, in terms of developing and fostering wider-community networks, addressing of local issues, access to markets for local products etc. In a comprehensive model the authors map the higher levels of media interest at policy levels and corporate PR to its lowest ebb at the grassroots development activity. The drivers of mass media growth are deeply rooted in the modernity paradigm, which is quite paradoxical with the elements of participatory development and communication. Often it is assumed that growth of Internet Technologies and Interactive Online Media demonstrates potential to pull the traditional mass media out of the modernity paradigm by encouraging and accommodating participation of the masses. However, in India, access to these new media is by far limited to urban middle-class, whereas the emergence of a truly deliberative and participatory democracy would solicit an active participation of the vast majority of the rural population, in both consumption and creation of content.

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