728 results for Conference item, 2014

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Optimisation of power transmission systems using a discrete Tabu Search method

    Connor, AM; Tilley, DG (2014-04-07)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents a brief description of the Tabu Search method and shows how it can be applied to two different power transmission systems. Examples are presented from two transmission systems. In the first example a mechanical transmission system is considered. A four bar mechanism is synthesised in order to produce a desired output motion. The second example is a hydrostatic transmission operating under closed loop control in order to maintain a constant operating speed as the loading conditions change.

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  • Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education

    Proctor, M.; Atkins, C.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Smith, H.; Trounson, R.; Sutton, K.; Benson, N.; Dyke, S.; McCarthy, C.; Otto, M.; Nicoll, C. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper defines a proposed set of Agile Principles for Tertiary Computing Education as developed through an Agile Education workshop held during the annual Computing South Island Educators’ (CSIE) forum. The purpose of the workshop was to explore innovative and ‘Agile’ approaches that have been used within our South Island institutions to consider whether the principles of Agile development could be usefully applied or adapted to tertiary computing education. Each case study was analysed to determine alignment with Agile principles and emerging themes in the application of these principles to tertiary computing education were identified and discussed. This led to the development of a proposed set of Agile principles for tertiary computing education to support the development of computing courses, course components and programmes. Meaningful learning has emerged as a key factor for further exploration

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  • The game’s the thing: Levelling up from novice status

    McCarthy, D P.; Oliver, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Quality computer engineering education is integral to the recruitment, retention, and employment of quality software engineers, as part of enabling a greater uptake of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers. The introductory programing course DICT440 uses Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB) and the team creation of a game, Theseus and the Minotaur, to teach introductory programing principles and skills. This paper argues that creativity is essential to innovation. Digital Games are being increasingly used in education and training internationally, as well as specifically in computer education. Aotearoa-New Zealand ITPs need to position themselves positively to leverage the creativity and motivation of software engineering students who are experienced gamers by developing games as part of teaching and learning software engineering. Computer game development courses can be developed collaboratively in a multi-disciplinary team, using appropriate learning theory, across ITPs in second and third year degree courses, in conjunction with regional game companies, alongside core business applications.

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  • Computer gaming and the positive effects on mental health

    McCarthy, C. M.; McBrearty, B. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 1970 a popular New Zealand student capping show was entitled “1 in 5” based on the then common expression “1 in 5 of us is mad”. In 2011 the New Zealand Mental Health reported exactly the same mental health statistics; 41 years on nothing had changed. However, other changes had taken place during that time – the advent of and continued development of the computer game. This poster paper explores the direct correlation between computer gaming and mental health and, in particular, the positive effects of computer gaming on mental health.

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  • Techniques for aligning IT education with industry demand

    Asgarkhani, M.; Clear, A. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Organizations rely increasingly on Information Technology (IT) solutions for day to day operations and as such IT solutions play a significant role in efficiency, effectiveness and innovation of processes in design, development and delivery of products and services. IT is a business enabler and has revolutionized the ways in which various sectors of the industry operate. Various reports and published research suggest that worldwide, IT skills are in short supply and high demand. Universities and other tertiary institutions play a key role in developing skilled IT workforce to meet these skills shortages. The use of most IT solution platforms is global. If language and cultural issues (that can potentially impact nature of design) we put aside, skills related to solution development processes and technology deployment are mostly common worldwide. IT is now a global industry. Therefore it is critical to align skills development strategies adopted within educational programs (offered by educational institutions) with realistic and relevant needs for the global market. Tertiary educational institutions make use of a variety of techniques and frameworks for aligning their programs with IT skills needs. Based on review of cases and previous research, this paper presents an overview of techniques deployed by tertiary educational institutions to ensure relevance and currency of their programs for developing skilled IT workforce.

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  • Fostering online student interaction using the OB3 web application for online study

    Daellenbach, R.; Davies, L.; Kensington, M.; Tamblyn, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The School of Midwifery at CPIT in Christchurch is undertaking an action research study on midwifery students and blended learning that commenced in 2010. This paper focusses on one aspect of this research which is the student’s experience of social isolation whilst working through the online component of the blended delivery. In response the teaching team initiated an intervention as a result, and replaced the existing content authoring software tool with a system that enables students to engage and interact with each other more effectively. We subsequently adopted the OB3 web application which has ameliorated this problem to a large extent. This paper sets out to explain why the OB3 web application was chosen and what effect this has had in terms of the student’s learning and the educators’ teaching experiences. Keywords: Asynchronous discussions, blended learning, cooperative learning, online learning

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  • Improving existing resources for interactive learning activities using tablets and touch screens

    Robson, D.; Kennedy, D. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As creating resources for interactive technology-based learning activities can be a huge task, we investigated how existing resources can be used and modified. Data were collected from students, observer, and teacher for several problems in a mathematics course on a computing degree that were part of interactive learning activities using touch screen technologies. It was found that existing problems could become effective resources in these activities simply by modifying them with suitable formatting, and that locating related elements together helped students start a problem. However, it is also important that pedagogical principles are followed.

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  • Pre-European Maori textiles from South Island New Zealand

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Laing, Raechel M; Walter, Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Relating colour, chemical and physical characteristics of artificially light-aged New Zealand plant fibres

    Lowe, Bronwyn J; Smith, Catherine A; Gordon, Keith C; Hanton, Lyall R; Ford, Bruce; Korsten, Annika; Fraser, Sara J; Lomax, Bethany A (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Light ageing of naturally-dyed plant fibres can cause colour change, alteration of molecular bonds within the fibre structure and loss of mechanical integrity. Lighting guidelines seek to protect artefacts by limiting light exposure, for example by estimating the lux hours likely to cause colour change of “one just noticeable fade” (1JNF). However the extent of associated molecular or mechanical damage is rarely simultaneously assessed. This paper reports a pilot study investigating the effects of accelerated light ageing on muka (fibre extracted from the leaves of Phormium tenax), the most common fibre used in Māori textiles. Non-dyed and dyed muka were artificially light-aged and micro-faded to ascertain exposure resulting in 1JNF. Raman microscopy and tensile testing of individual fibres from the same samples were used to explore correlations among fading, molecular change and mechanical properties.

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  • Collaboration and the Poutasi Project : it takes a village to create a documentary film

    Fuluifaga, Aanoalii; Harris, Miriam (2014-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The South Pacific has a long history of colonisers and outsiders imposing their own projections and viewpoints upon the different island nations, rather than seeking a perspective that is authentically engaged with the culture, philosophies, and experiences of the inhabitants. Whether it be Paul Gauguin’s projection of desire upon the Tahitian landscape and its women, painting an erotic imaginary for the French bourgeoisie and its Parisian salons, or an Australian tourist snapping a photo of the staff at the hotel where she’s been staying and loudly requesting “a real Samoan smile”, representations run the risk of being misinformed outsider perceptions, rather than a valid internal voice. This was one of the quandaries facing a team of lecturers from Unitec New Zealand - a polytechnic in Auckland - in creating a short documentary that chronicles the rebuilding efforts of Poutasi village, Samoa, in the wake of the 2009 tsunami and the 2013 cyclone. A range of people, both Samoan and Palagi (European), have contributed to the rebuild, and it was important that their contributions be acknowledged, while at the same time incorporating a filmmaking procedure that is respectful of Samoan ethics and philosophies. Such a respect would hopefully express a dynamic and experience that emanates from within the village and its residents, rather than just communicate observations from an objective distance.

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  • Micro-computed tomography for plant identification in artefacts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Lowe, Bronwyn J.; McNoughton, Andrew (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the identification of materials of construction of Māori textiles has important cultural and legal connotations. However the identification of aged and processed plant material in artefacts is difficult, compounded by the need for use of nondestructive analytical methods. This paper will discuss the application, efficacy and implications of a new method that uses micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) together with an identification key as evaluative criteria for the identification of plant material in artefacts. Case studies using Māori textiles will show how plant identification using microCT can aid in ascribing cultural context to artefacts with unknown provenance, and aid in rediscovery of cultural knowledge about plant use for artefact production.

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  • Communal land tenure: can policy planning for the future be improved?

    Goodwin, David (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In developing Geomatics for Africa, communal land tenure must be among the most intractable of the issues faced. This paper seeks insights into likely communal land policy priorities in Southern Africa by contrasting issues in Zimbabwe with those of New Zealand, whose colonisation process unfolded approximately half a century earlier. Beginning with a background historical summary of the respective countries, the paper goes on to review their current communal tenure status and concludes that the comparison may be helpful at least in identifying issues to be aware of. In particular, finetuning of succession laws is likely to be an area that merits close attention, and whether state social security is ever able to deliver security comparable with kinship groups. As communal land declines in pre-eminence in the survival equation it will likely increase in symbolic importance, which could bring in its train issues such as higher accommodation densities on communal land to which people have connection. Clear thinking is needed on whether particular portions of communal land with special cultural significance (for example, graveyards and homesteads) could best be managed by a model that optimises cultural rather than productive use.

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  • Detecting the spread of a known rainbow skink (Lampropholis delicata) population over an island.

    Killick, Sarah A.; Galbraith, Mel; Fraser, Diane; Waipara, Nick; Cook, Jeff; Wairepo, Jacqui (2014)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    L. delicata characteristics Tryphena, Great Barrier Island Results

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  • Before and beyond the great financial crisis: men and education, labour market and well-being trends and issues in New Zealand

    Rasmussen, E; Hannam, B (2014-01-30)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper provides an overview of a research area which has generated limited research or impact on public policy: men and their educational, labour market and well-being issues and trends in New Zealand. Males have had lower levels of educational achievements than women across primary, intermediate and secondary schools and this has become a long-term embedded pattern. This has subsequently influenced tertiary education where the current dearth of domestic male students has become noticeable in several fields (including some concerning ethnicity patterns). The labour market trends have recorded two rather contradictory patterns: on one hand, some traditional occupational and industry gender patterns have been remarkable slow to change while other gender patterns – particular in service and professional occupations - have recorded a dramatic transformation in recent decades. Finally, male well-being and particular well-being amongst younger males need to become a public policy concern with their high rates of suicide, incarceration and work-related deaths and sickness.

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  • Corporate governance, financing patterns, and the cost of capital

    Tourani Rad, A; Koerniadi, H (2014-02-03)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we examine the effects of corporate governance mechanisms on financing policies in a research setting where agency problems and external financing constraints are expected to be high and restrictive. Using a unique self-constructed corporate governance index and employing the Fama and French (1999) financing model of firms, we find that firms with weak corporate governance mechanisms have more leverage than do firms with strong governance mechanisms. After controlling for the effects among corporate governance components, we observe that firms with different levels of corporate governance quality use different corporate governance mechanisms in relation to their financing policies. Our results suggest that firms can dynamically adjust their leverage as a governance mechanism through compensation policy and shareholder rights.

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  • Journey into the user experience: creating a library website that's not for librarians

    Murdoch, C; Hearne, S (2014-02-10)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland University of Technology Library started work on a major redevelopment of its website in 2012. The problem was that the website content, as is the case for many library websites, had been written by librarians with almost no user input. The challenge was to redesign the website, rethinking our entire focus and placing the user at the centre of the process. This is the story of a journey of transformational change based on our user-centric approach. We believe we have achieved what we set out to do and created a website that’s built not for librarians but for users.

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  • Minor parties and employment relations policy change: the New Zealand experience

    Skilling, PD; Molineaux, J (2014-02-11)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Employment relations is shaping up as an important point of differentiation between the two major parties (National and Labour) at New Zealand’s 2014 general election. Since the country adopted a proportional electoral system in 1996, however, no major party has had a majority in Parliament. Consequently, in order to effect its preferred policy programme, the dominant party has had to rely on the votes of other, smaller parties. Both Labour-led (1999-2008) and National-led governments (2008-current) have, with the aid of minor parties, changed the employment relations landscape when in power. In this paper we consider the important role of minor parties in determining likely changes to ER policy settings after the election. We argue that merely identifying the minor parties’ policies is not sufficient to predict policy change or influence. It is necessary also to understand both (a) how minor parties are situated within a broader institutional setting and (b) how their policies fit within a broader political (and electoral) environment. Muller and Strom (1999) draw a distinction between three distinct motivations of minor political parties: their desire for official office; for policy wins, and for electoral votes. For minor parties, entering into a relationship with a larger party offers their best chance of achieving political voice. This does not guarantee, however, the advancement of its policy agenda, and it may come at the cost of its long-term electoral popularity. In this paper we draw on recent New Zealand experience to develop a model for understanding the likely influence of minor parties on ER policy change in New Zealand after the 2014 election. To be viable, such a model must take into account - at a minimum - relative party size, the centrality of ER policy to the parties’ identities, the degree of similarity between the parties involved, and the personalities of party leaders.

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  • Implementation of an advanced and secure system using wireless medical devices in healthcare settings

    Baig, M; Gholamhosseini, H (2014-01-22)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Computer-based and wireless patient monitoring systems are emerging as a low cost, reliable and accurate way of healthcare delivery. Advanced and secure solutions such as electronic records, mobile systems and cloud computing have been developed for healthcare. Most tele-health solutions send data or video remotely to healthcare providers but very few systems are in place for both vital signs and video connectivity in real-time. We proposed an advanced and efficient telehealth solution focusing on video conferencing (consultation) between patients and medical professionals in addition to wireless vital signs transmission. The selected vital signs include; blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, body temperature, spirometry (lung volumes) and blood glucose level.

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  • Crossing the Tasman: determinants of price discovery for Australia-New Zealand cross-listed shares

    Gilbert, A; Frijns, B; Tourani, A (2014-01-17)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Price discovery is the process by which markets incorporate new information. In this study, we investigate the price discovery for 19 stocks cross-listed on the NZX and the ASX between 1998 and 2012. We observe strong downward trends in the contribution to price discovery of the NZX, both for New Zealand firms cross-listing on the ASX, and Australian firms cross-listing on the NZX. This suggests that the competitiveness of the NZX relative to the ASX is decreasing. Towards the end of the sample period, 50% of the price discovery for New Zealand firms takes place on the ASX, and the NZX acts as a satellite market for Australian firms. We further examine the driving factors behind this decline, such as spreads, and trading and quoting activity.

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