6,228 results for Conference item

  • Pluvial Urbanism

    Bradbury, Matthew (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Waterfronts are a critical site for urban redevelopment in the early 21st century. However many waterfront sites have serious environmental problems, especially the management of contaminated stormwater, which contemporary models of waterfront development do little to remedy. Why? While there is a good understanding of techniques that are viable for the remediation of urban stormwater, they are often ignored or treated as a design novelty. The author suggests that the cause is to be found in the way market forces dominate waterfront development models. Contemporary urban theory such as new urbanism is complicit with these forces, advocating an urban planning model with a high FAR (Floor Area Ratio) and large areas of impervious surface. The author proposes the development of an alternative waterfront development strategy using GIS-based mapping. Focusing on how the remediation of urban stormwater could drive the development of a new model of urban development on the waterfront, the author uses GIS mapping to explore the effect of pervious and impervious surfaces on the production of stormwater in an urban catchment. In a similar way GIS mapping is used to simulate different urban densities. A case study project on the Wynyard Quarter, Auckland, New Zealand is used to explore these techniques. The result is the development of a GIS model that models the consequences of increased density on urban stormwater remediation within a catchment. The model helps planners and developers to conceive an environmental sustainable urban waterfront while ensuring an economically viable return.

    View record details
  • Te Pakihi o Matauranga Māori : The Business of Māori Education

    Molyneux, Ngaire (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    “A great job for every graduate” This is a big promise and this promise is nigh on impossible given the growing number and diversity of students entering the New Zealand education system. In business to make a promise you can’t deliver can result in an epic fail. However we could have the capacity to do this for Maori students through building a robust foundation and pathway based on principles such as Potikitanga (Tapsell and Woods, 2008) Rangatiratanga, Kaitiakitanga and Nohokotaitanga. Where once Maori were the minority in the business class room this now applies to all New Zealanders on a large and rapidly growing scale. We live in a world of globalization, privatisation and corporatisation where rapid paced change is the norm, we need to be more nimble, resilient and proactive. In order to keep up with this pace an understanding of international business is necessary. In business, the best way to know what your customer values is to ask them so in education ask the students what they value, ask industry what they value and integrate these derivers into teaching. Bring Maori business, students and educators together to korero on a regular basis from a Maori social and economic perspective. The education system burdened with bureaucracy and institutional politics moves too slowly to take up entrepreneurial opportunities. The education sector can learn a great deal from small medium enterprise, if you don’t move quickly when opportunity knocks you will miss the waka.

    View record details
  • Strategy Now! A review of the literature of ePortfolio use in work integrated learning

    Ayling, Diana (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Since the arrival of Web 2.0 technologies use of ePortfolios in higher education has dramatically increased in all disciplines. These portfolios are used to encourage students to collate and curate their learning experiences. EPortfolios are sometimes used in assessment processes, and this is challenging as views are mixed as to how a fluid and dynamic portfolio of learning can be effectively assessed. Issues such as access, security, privacy and ownership are further complicating the use of portfolios. There is some use of ePortfolios in work integrated education, and while some practitioners are convinced of the benefits for students, host organisations and academic institutions, other point to significant challenges in implementation and creating positive student learning experiences. This paper is a summary of the writing and emerging issues from implementation of ePortfolios in work integrated learning. EPortfolios offer a range of advantages over traditional methods of collation and curation of learning experiences and development. Within an ePortfolio students have the opportunity to collate artifacts, reflect on their practice and plan their professional development. They can tailor their portfolios for different purposes and audiences.

    View record details
  • Interventions that build resilient relationships: Learning skills for productive conversations.

    Cardno, Carol (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Water quantity and quality issues in Canterbury water

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Oral presentation slides based on a talk given to the NZIA&HS, Lincoln University, 2014: (Having your cake and eating it too: balancing different land uses and their impacts (Or: Having your river & swimming in it too)). Paper to the ‘Canterbury Water –Are we doing enough?’ public forum; Southern Environment Trust, Hagley Oval Function Lounge, 18th March 2015.

    View record details
  • Real Text-CS - Corpus based domain independent content selection model

    Perera, R; Nand, P

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Content selection is a highly domain dependent task responsible for retrieving relevant information from a knowledge source using a given communicative goal. This paper presents a domain independent content selection model using keywords as communicative goal. We employ DBpedia triple store as our knowledge source and triples are selected based on weights assigned to each triple. The calculation of the weights is carried out through log likelihood distance between a domain corpus and a general reference corpus. The method was evaluated using keywords extracted from QALD dataset and the performance was compared with cross entropy based statistical content selection. The evaluation results showed that the proposed method can perform 32% better than cross entropy based statistical content selection.

    View record details
  • Intelligent and Affective Tutoring Systems - emerging trends and future possibilities [Keynote speech]

    Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Many software systems would significantly improve performance if they could adapt to the emotional state of the user, for example if e-learning systems, Automatic Teller Machines, ticketing machines and robotic systems could recognise when users were happy, confused, frustrated or angry they could interact and guide the user accordingly and improve the service. We believe that e-learning systems and especially intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) would be significantly enhanced if these systems could adapt to the emotions of learners. This idea has led to the development of Affective Tutoring Systems (ATSs): ATSs are ITSs that are able to adapt to the affective state of learners. This keynote address presents research leading to the development of an Affective Tutoring System which is the first of its kind and holds great promise for e-learning systems. The system utilises a computer systems, using a camera to detect learner's emotion through facial expressions and gestures and other significant bio-signals. The system is able to adapt to students and displays emotion via a lifelike agent called Eve. Eve’s tutoring adaptations are guided by a case-based reasoning method for adapting to student states; this method uses data that was generated by an observational study of human tutors. This talk presents the observational study, the case-based method, the ATS itself and the implementation of its emotion detection technology on a computer system for real-time performance, and finally the implications of the findings for Human Computer Interaction in general and e-learning in particular. Other applications of the technology especially in health developed in this research are discussed and future directions are presented.

    View record details
  • Art into Nature: Elementalism in Contemporary Public Art and Architecture

    Chua, Eu Jin (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In the study of ancient or pagan thought, the term “elementalism” is sometimes used to refer to the personification of nature’s elements — for example, the belief in the existence of a god of wind or god of fire. Conversely there is a new elementalism at work in contemporary art. Recent artists have pursued - often in public works - atmospheric manipulations of elemental effects: clouds, sky, air, water, light, or smoke. Common in contemporary artists such as Olafur Eliasson, Roni Horn, and Rachel Whiteread, is a reductivist approach that strips aesthetic objects down to phenomenal essences. A similar tendency can be seen in contemporary architecture, with Diller+Scofidio’s Blur building (2002) being a notable example. If the Crystal Palace of 1851 is said to be the first building in the world in which “atmosphere is perceptible” (Merrifield), the Blur project subtracts the built almost entirely in favour of elemental effects. Gernot Böhme (1993) has suggested that the idea of atmosphere can serve to supersede foundational Western conceptions of the aesthetic that are founded in subject/object distinctions (experiencing atmosphere doesn’t require one to be a subject counterpoint- ed against an object). Recent elementalist works could be said to stage precisely such a superseding of classical aesthetics through their dissolution of art or architecture into nothing but atmosphere. Replacing aesthetic objects and subjects apprehending them are fields of affect. My primary interest in such works, however, is that this dematerialization of the aesthetic object is more than a dissolution into affect — it is also a dissolution into nature. The Art-Nature distinction is – alongside the subject-object distinct – one of the key premises of Western thought. Kant long ago held that, whereas nature is the realm of mere ungoverned effects (effectus), art is the deliberate human transformation of such arbitrary effects into determined objects ensouled by reason and meaning. The Art- Nature distinction therefore endorses the Subject-Object distinction and shores up the supposed superiority of the former over the latter. Recent elementalist works ignore this classical policing of the line between art and nature. Many contemporary artists apparently want their works to approach the ostensible indeterminateness of nonhuman nature. The dissolution of the object into atmosphere and affect thus seems to imply a ‘naturalization’ of art — perhaps a dehumanization, or perhaps a post-humanism? This paper explores the idea that, in their annulment of the art-nature distinction by means of elemental atmospherics, the new elementalists might also be intuitively con- ducting an advanced kind of posthumanist naturphilosophie.

    View record details
  • Considerations for cultural and social spaces in University Library

    Gazula, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper explores my thoughts on a research project, how social and cultural conditions play a major role in students’ life, and influences the social and cultural practices of the university library usage at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) Manukau Campus. This research will examine the students’ use of the library and the study space in and around the campus. This qualitative research is a case study to explore the library usage at the Manukau Campus. The exploration will be based on the interviews with my library colleagues and academic staff, including focus group methods with students, and observation of the influences on social and cultural practices on a university library usage at the Manukau Campus. The paper concludes that, while planning or redeveloping libraries, one needs to consider the social and cultural impact of spaces for students of different ethnicities and how these support peer learning, create a sense of belonging, encourage student retention, and contribute to increasing enrolment at the university.

    View record details
  • Pilot study into the causes of airway drying during continuous positive air pressure breathing

    White, DE; Nates, RJ; Bartley, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) lining the upper respiratory tract has an essential role in heat and moisture exchange, as well as having an important role in airway defense. Continuous positive air pressure (CPAP) users frequently report troublesome symptoms of airway dryness and nasal congestion. Clinical investigations have demonstrated that supplementary humidification reduces these symptoms but the reason for their occurrence remains unexplained. Previously, symptoms of nasal drying have been attributed to unidirectional airflow created by mouth leaks; however these still occur when leaks are absent. Tidal breathing stresses have previously been shown to regulate epithelial cell ionic fluid secretion and reabsorption into the ASL [1]. The purpose of this study was to determine whether augmented air pressures change overall mucosal ASL water supply and, if so, the extent of this effect. It is hypothesized that the low-level positive airway pressures used in CPAP therapy could reduce the ability of respiratory mucosa to humidify inhaled air as a result of reduced ASL supply from the airway mucosa.

    View record details
  • Who cares? Creative research practice in the space of the university

    O'Connor, MT (2012-04-08)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research seminar aims to disclose how creative practice through writing, filmmaking and considerations of spatial design (particularly housed within the ruling symbolic of the University) can open onto something proximate to a poetics of the feminine. Further, it is not only a question of sexual difference here that inaugurates the trembling of propositional and rational forms of knowing, and yet for many it is the body that has been a helpful place to start. This seminar brings Deleuze and Guattari’s vitalist philosophy on the image (affect and percept) into proximity with the language-body-projects of Écriture Féminines (Irigrary, Cixous, Le Doeuff, Kristeva).

    View record details
  • Redeveloping a signature pedagogy for engineering: responding to new spaces and new technologies

    (2013-07-04)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Within disciplines, characteristic pedagogical approaches have developed that reflect the particular nature of those disciplines. Engineering, with its strong mathematical foundation, is dependent on developing problem solving methods using symbolic mathematical and diagrammatic processes. Traditional approaches featured step-by-step handwritten expositions with oral commentary delivered in spaces equipped with technology (blackboards) that supported these distinctive approaches. Over time, the design of learning spaces and their installed technologies has changed, often under pressure for institutional efficiency gains. A generic institutionally-timetabled teaching space equipped with a computer connected to digital display projector as the primary visual interface has emerged as a standard learning and teaching environment. In these environments, computing technologies with primarily keyboard and mouse based input encourage a dependence on pre-prepared static PowerPoint slides, leading to a focus on ‘a solution’, rather than emphasising the process. In engineering, the immediacy and responsiveness of the traditional approach, with its free flowing mathematics, diagrams and sketches, is lost. However, developments in pen-enabled tablets and monitors, by providing support for handwriting and sketching input, may facilitate the reclamation of the benefits of traditional engineering approaches, while also enabling the development of new innovative, collaborative approaches that are not constrained by physical spaces. This showcase will discuss our initial experiences with implementing the use of pen-enabled technology in the School of Engineering at AUT, and explore the possibilities it offers for developing a new signature pedagogy for Engineering.

    View record details
  • How Medical Imaging is Contributing to Leadership Development: mBiT and the discovery of multiple brains

    Henwood, Suzanne; Soosalu, Grant; Oka, Marvin (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    mBIT (multiple Brain Integration Technologies) is a fascinating, new and world leading development in leadership, both in leadership development approaches and in our understanding of what leadership is and how it can be maximised. Developed by Grant Soosalu and Marvin Oka in Australia, but delivered first in New Zealand, mBIT offers new insight into how we can optimise both leadership and personal success. Neuroscience over the last ten years has radically changed our knowledge of the human body - both its structure and its functioning and medical imaging (in particular fMRI) is at the forefront of much of that work. It seems wholly appropriate then that as a profession we look at the applications of that knowledge as new fields emerge and evolve. This paper will present some of the neuroscience findings and share with you some fascinating facts about your three brains (head, heart and gut), raising your awareness of a whole new field that you can go on to explore in greater depth after the conference. Leadership literature is littered with calls for the need for a new approach to leadership. The increasing complexity of society and the rapid pace of change is challenging leaders to look at how they can be even more adaptive and how they can generate followers in an increasingly negative and demanding world. mBIT offers some tools and techniques to complement existing leadership styles, to transform leadership in practice. This paper will share with you current and leading edge thinking of one aspect of leadership development.

    View record details
  • Conservation of the Unfashionable: Lichens and Bryophytes in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park

    Blanchon, Dan (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The New Zealand lichen and bryophyte floras are highly diverse but are often overlooked in conservation efforts. The islands, estuaries and coastal zones of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park support a wide range of species of lichens and bryophytes but information on species distributions, threats and critical habitats is not readily available, so is therefore not commonly used in conservation management. Useful information does exist and species lists for some islands and coastal forest remnants have been published in journals such as Tane and the Auckland Botanical Society Journal. Further information can be found in monographs for particular genera. The most complete data can be found in herbarium collections, particularly those in the herbarium of the Auckland Museum and Institute (AK). This and information from other herbarium collections can be accessed online through the New Zealand Virtual Herbarium, although the information is not yet complete and not all collections are databased. National threat listings were done for lichens for the first time in 2012 and for bryophytes for the third time in 2011, and these publications include a number of threatened species found in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. Important habitats for lichens include coastal forest, coastal volcanic rocks, broadleaf forest and old mangrove forest. It is generally assumed that restoring native forest will also restore lichen and bryophyte floras, but there is no evidence for this and recent research on the effects of ecological restoration on lichens suggest that some lichens may not compete well with introduced grasses. To include lichens and bryophytes in ecological restoration it is important to restore key native tree substrate species, improve our knowledge of data deficient species, perform population surveys of threatened species, improve our knowledge of individual sites and investigate how to reintroduce species which may have been lost.

    View record details
  • Matatika Matai Ora: An ethical framework for medical imaging technology students.

    de Bueger, Tracy (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Whakapapa - discussion paper • Definition • Link to clinical practice • Level definition • Evaluative questions • Scenario based question

    View record details
  • Screening of algorithms for ensemble modelling of marine and terrestrial invasive species to New Zealand

    Aguilar, Glenn; Gilchrist, Rowena; Blake, Jett (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Performance based screening of species distribution model (SDM) outputs to produce an ensemble of results was used to determine the suitability of New Zealand to highly threatening terrestrial and marine invasive species. Recorded occurrences of the yellow crazy ant (Anoplepis gracilepis) and Northern Pacific sea star (Asterias amurensis) in the nearest land masses were used as presence data for the models. The modeling process also employed terrestrial environmental variables from the Worldclim database and marine environmental layers from the BioOracle database. Performance evaluation metrics including the Area Under Curve (AUC), kappa and true skill statistic (TSS) were used as the basis for selecting the best performing algorithms used for creating ensembled outputs. The resulting maps show that the coastal waters of the country have generally higher suitability for the sea star while the terrestrial areas are not as suitable for the yellow crazy ant. Results provide an indication of the comparative performance of different algorithms, the limits of available environmental datasets and applicability of an ensemble approach to marine and terrestrial species distribution modeling.

    View record details
  • Ensemble species distribution modelling of Coleoptera in Viti Levu, Fiji

    Waqa-Sakiti, Hilda; Aguilar, Glenn; Winder, Linton (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Species distribution modelling (SDM) was used to characterise the distribution of nine families of the Order Coleoptera (Beetles) on the island of Viti Levu, Fiji. Occurrence data were sourced from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and a recent survey, together with available bioclimatic layers. A set of suitability maps was produced as a result of employing various algorithms and a consensus of results of the best performing algorithms finally resulted in a single map which displays the spatial characteristics of Coleoptera distribution. The ensemble model for Coleoptera identified an altitudinal transect in southeastern Viti Levu within low to upland forested areas as most suitable for Coleoptera. As the transect extended to higher altitudes (cloud forest) the suitability was reduced to medium suitability. The results of this study correspond well with the already established PABITRA (Pacific Asia Biodiversity Transect) Gateway transect, Western Belt sites for Fiji which runs through the lowland forests of Savura to the upland forests of Waisoi and up the cloud forests of Navai and further support its selection as a representation of Fiji’s rich and unique biodiversity. An assessment of the impacts of future climate change on Coleoptera distribution along this PABITRA transect will be highlighted. Therefore, in terms of the identification of possible Protected Areas in Viti Levu, it would be wise for planners and managers to protect areas along this altitudinal transect on the southeastern site of Viti Levu.

    View record details
  • Changing Attitudes Towards Kea - Conflict to Co-existence

    Orr-Walker, Tamsin; Roberts, Lorne (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Condemned as a sheep killer from the mid 1800’s, the kea population was reduced by an estimated 150,000 during a legal government bounty until partial protection in the early 1970’s. Now numbering fewer than 5,000 they are listed as Nationally Endangered but kea deaths attributed to conflict situations still occur today. The reasons for conflict, sheep strike and property damage, remain relatively unchanged from the early 1900’s and unfortunately the attitudes of some people living within the species range remain similarly unchanged. New Zealand is hailed for its conservation philosophy and successes and this continued negative relationship with kea should concern all New Zealanders. Resolving conflict through changing people’s perceptions and finding methods of reducing the impact of kea on human property is therefore a priority for us all. The Kea Conservation Trust (2006) partnered and supported by Department of Conservation (DOC) has recently formalised a new Strategic Plan for Kea Conservation. Two of the three aims include threat mitigation and community engagement, and as such it is hoped that the issue of human-kea conflict and the resulting 150 year struggle with kea will finally be laid to rest.

    View record details
  • The good news and bad news about the African club moss (Selaginella kraussian)

    Blanchon, Dan; Nessia, Haley; McClymont, M.; Dale, Arnja; Perrot, J.; Aguilar, Glenn; Waipara, N. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Consultant Practice in the UK: What can we learn in Australasia about changing role boundaries?

    Henwood, Suzanne; Booth, Lisa (2013-03)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on a College of Radiographers Industry Partnership Scheme (CORIPS) funded project, based In the UK, exploring the role of the consultant radiographer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: An in-depth longitudinal case study over two years was used to explore a number of aspects of consultant practice. Data was collected from a number of sources: open and in depth Interviews, reflective diaries, coaching sessions and an objective leadership measurement tool. RESULTS: (i) Key obstacles and challenges were shown to include: a lack of clarity in role structures, individual resistance to development, a lack of confidence in the higher level role (not related to clinical practice), a lack of support (especially when newly appointed) and a lack of feedback on performance over time. Some of the barriers and challenges reduced over time raising interesting issues around role transition and suggestions were made as to how to improve the transition of future practitioners to new roles. (ii) Professional development needs highlighted the necessity to be proactive in development planning and a particular need for more leadership development was identified. Clinical expertise was not felt to be the key area where development was required, but across the other areas of practice: research, strategic development and managing difficult contexts were particularly highlighted as areas that required further development. (iii) Recruitment was often associated with a particular individual in a clinical role. Key drivers were found to be around career choice, personal challenge and making a difference. It was perceived that changes to role boundaries had to be driven clinically, with support from academic Institutions and the professional body. A passionate Interest in the area of practice, higher levels of responsibility and autonomy and a perceived variety in the day to day role (along with continual development of the role) kept consultants satisfied over time, while the thought of: a lack of being valued, a lack of a positive environment, a lack of variety In practice, making a significant mistake and lack of trust or autonomy, were given as reasons as to why consultants might leave their post. CONCLUSIONS: The paper outlines some of the key issues around the three areas highlighted and offers some suggestions as to how this information could be used to influence, attract and retain radiographers at a higher level in Australia and New Zealand

    View record details