6,235 results for Conference item

  • Digital identity: are students' views regarding digital representation of 'self' gendered?

    Lewis, L

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Through the medium of a showcase eportfolio, the owner creates and expresses a digital ‘self’ for an external, virtual audience. As teacher education graduates realize the value of creating eportfolio views for prospective employers, questions of authentic or ethical representations of the personal and professional self are raised. This finding from our recent research with teacher education students was challenged by a conference audience in 2012 as representing a ‘typical’ female response. Consequently, in order to test the expressed assumption that females hold a more ethical approach to ‘authentic’ digital identity than males, further research has been conducted. Two focus groups, each with either male or female participants explored questions around digital identity and the (re)presentation of ‘self’. The findings will be shared in this presentation.

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  • Analyzing confidentiality and privacy concerns: insights from Android issue logs

    Licorish, S; MacDonell, SG; Clear, T

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Context: Post-release user feedback plays an integral role in improving software quality and informing new features. Given its growing importance, feedback concerning security enhancements is particularly noteworthy. In considering the rapid uptake of Android we have examined the scale and severity of Android security threats as reported by its stakeholders. Objective: We systematically mine Android issue logs to derive insights into stakeholder perceptions and experiences in relation to certain Android security issues. Method: We employed contextual analysis techniques to study issues raised regarding confidentiality and privacy in the last three major Android releases, considering covariance of stakeholder comments, and the level of consistency in user preferences and priorities. Results: Confidentiality and privacy concerns varied in severity, and were most prevalent over Jelly Bean releases. Issues raised in regard to confidentiality related mostly to access, user credentials and permission management, while privacy concerns were mainly expressed about phone locking. Community users also expressed divergent preferences for new security features, ranging from more relaxed to very strict. Conclusions: Strategies that support continuous corrective measures for both old and new Android releases would likely maintain stakeholder confidence. An approach that provides users with basic default security settings, but with the power to configure additional security features if desired, would provide the best balance for Android's wide cohort of stakeholders.

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  • Teaching refugees as adult learners in a research-informed way

    Benseman, John (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    STUDY AIMS: To document and analyse the learning needs and issues of adult refugees with low language and literacy skills TO identify educational strategies for teaching refugee learners and provide a teaching resource for other teachers based on the project’s findings

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  • Learning for the long haul: Developing perceptions of learning affordances in CALL teachers

    Haines, Karen (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This presentation reports on an investigation into situated teacher learning and their developing understandings of the affordances of new computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools. In-service teachers need to identify the affordances that a new tool offers for language learning in order to make decisions about which technologies they will choose to support their teaching practice. While general typologies of affordance have been identified for technology use in learning, the kinds of affordance that language teachers perceive in technology have not been specified. Sixteen tertiary teachers in Australia and New Zealand were interviewed over a period of fourteen months with reference to the knowledge they acquired around the use of new technologies in their classrooms. The term ‘learning affordance’ was coined to describe ways in which teachers perceived use of CMC tools promoted language learning in the classroom. Participants identified that new tools allowed students to engage not only with the traditional content of language learning (language skills and learning about the L2 culture) but also to engage with the processes of learning language (in relation to communication, affective factors and autonomy). Teachers also saw affordances for their teaching in relation to these areas. Implications for in-service teacher development include supporting participatory activities for on-going teacher learning such as inquiry, observation and reflection.

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  • Children in a community of learners: Encouraging respectful interactions

    Bishop, Pauline (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Questions to consider: What do children learn from how we treat them? What impact does our treatment have on them as members of a community? What does it mean to hold children in unconditional positive regard? Some strategies used by teachers to manage children’s behaviour involve power over tactics. The effectiveness and rationale for these strategies is challenged.

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  • The role of emotions on people's behaviour in emergencies

    Mizutani, Satomi; Dallow, Tomoko (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    It is argued that positive emotions are likely to broaden people’s sense of options and to encourage them to consider various solutions while negative emotions are likely to narrow people’s focus and to restrict their sense of options (e.g., Fredrickson, 2001). However, little attention has been paid to the role of such emotions on people’s behaviour when they face an emergency situation. In March 2011, Japan suffered triple disasters: the Great East Japan Earthquake, a massive tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear accident. The people who directly experienced the disasters needed to decide whether they should evacuate the area. This work-in-progress research will investigate factors, especially the role of emotions which determined their decisions. The research will measure the extent of the positive/negative emotions held by them after the Earthquake and will investigate how their emotions determined their sense of options and their behaviour.

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  • Something Old, Something New: Dealing with the challenge of new digital tools

    Haines, Karen (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Do new digital tools challenge who we are or what we do as language teachers? This session draws on theory, practice and recent research in CALL to explore some of the realities of keeping pace with new tool and software development. Appropriate strategies will be discussed for helping teachers best make decisions about which tools to ‘choose, to use or to refuse’ as Chapelle (2006) suggests, including the notion of affordance as a useful lens for pedagogical integration. Suggestions will also be given to support teacher learning from a situated perspective.

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  • An empirical cognitive model of the development of shared understanding of requirements

    Buchan, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    It is well documented that customers and software development teams need to share and refine understanding of the requirements throughout the software development lifecycle. The development of this shared understand- ing is complex and error-prone however. Techniques and tools to support the development of a shared understanding of requirements (SUR) should be based on a clear conceptualization of the phenomenon, with a basis on relevant theory and analysis of observed practice. This study contributes to this with a detailed conceptualization of SUR development as sequence of group-level state transi- tions based on specializing the Team Mental Model construct. Furthermore it proposes a novel group-level cognitive model as the main result of an analysis of data collected from the observation of an Agile software development team over a period of several months. The initial high-level application of the model shows it has promise for providing new insights into supporting SUR development.

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  • A scalable approach for re-configuring evolving industrial control systems

    Sinha, R; Johnson, K; Calinescu, R

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    We present a scalable approach to automatically re-configure evolving IEC 61499 systems for deployment onto an available set of resources. We capture system architecture and high-level configuration requirements formally, and use an efficient SMT-based constraint resolution to generate a valid system configuration. Any changes in the system architecture, configuration requirements, or resources are automatically translated into a minimal set of updated constraints, allowing a faster reconfiguration as compared to a monolithic approach where the whole system is re-configured. We show the feasibility of our approach by studying an airport baggage handling system developed using the IEC 61499 standard.

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  • LTE-advanced based handover mechanism for natural disaster situations

    Ray, SK; Sarkar, NI; Deka, D

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Telecommunication networks often face power outage problems in the natural disaster affected areas. Also, owing to a sudden substantial increase in network traffic loads the battery backup power of the base stations run out quickly and therefore hampering telecommunication services. To overcome this system performance issues, we propose a Long Term Evolution (LTE)-Advanced (LTE-A)-based user equipment (UE)-controlled and base station (Evolved Node B or eNB)-assisted handover scheme. The idea is to limit the arrival of new traffic to an already overloaded eNB by diverting their handover to lightly loaded nearby eNBs. The novelty of this work is the ability of an UE to self-detect the occurrence of a natural disaster and to self-select the most suitable target eNB (TeNB) to handover with in the disaster affected areas. The handover is performed by obtaining the weighted average score (WAS) of the direction of motion (DoM) and the leftover battery backup power of the different neighboring eNBs (NeNB). The UE also predicts its DoM and dynamically adjust the weights of the two parameters if it’s a disaster situation. Preliminary simulation results show that the scheme can offer up to 65% handover success rate in disaster situations.

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  • Examining the mechanical influences upon the sciatic nerve at the sciatic nerve-hamstring muscle interface during active and passive knee extension

    Ellis, R; Fox, J; Hitt, JR; Langevin, H; Henry, SM

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Ultrasound imaging has been used to examine movement of the peripheral nervous system in response to normal body movements and therapeutic exercises, such as neural mobilisation. Researchers have clearly established that peripheral nerves must be able to move in relation to their surrounding interfacing tissues. However, to date the mechanical influences that these interfacing tissues have upon nerve movement has yet to be determined. Purpose: We sought to examine the different mechanical influences that the surrounding hamstring muscles have upon the sciatic nerve during lower limb movements. A better understanding of the mechanical influences imposed upon the sciatic nerve, from surrounding tissues, would be beneficial to then examine these relationships in clinical populations including lumbar-related leg pain. Methods: A cross-sectional, observational laboratory study was conducted in ten healthy participants (2 males, 8 females; age 24 ± 5 years (mean ± SD); height 169 ± 7 cm; weight, 65 ± 9 kg; body mass index, 23 ± 3 kg/m2) who underwent knee extension movements (active and passive) in upright sitting and side-lying positions. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was used to assess lateral displacement of the sciatic nerve and hamstring muscles (superficial and deep regions). Ultrasound elastography was used to calculate the shear strain between the sciatic nerve-hamstring muscle interface. Electromyography was used to assess the electrical activity of the hamstring muscles during the active and passive limb movements. Range of motion of the pelvis, hip and knee joints was measured with inertial sensors in order to standardize the limb movements among participants. Results: In both the sitting and side-lying positions, passive knee extension resulted in greater differential lateral displacement of the sciatic nerve versus the hamstring muscles along with greater shear strain at the sciatic nerve-hamstring muscle interface when compared to active knee extension. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggest that the greatest amount of differential lateral displacement between the sciatic nerve and the hamstring muscles occurs during passive knee extension compared to active knee extension. Furthermore, this greater differential movement was associated with increased sciatic nerve-hamstring muscle shear strain in the passive compared to the active condition. Implications: Treatment interventions, such as neural mobilisation exercises, employ either active of passive limb movements to induce peripheral nerve movement in disorders where nerve movement is believed to be compromised. Knee extension, whether active or passive, is commonly utilised to induce movement of the sciatic nerve relative to the interfacing hamstring muscles. It would appear from this research that although passive knee extension resulted in greater movement of the sciatic nerve relative to the hamstring muscles, this was accompanied by an increase in nerve-muscle interface shear strain. In many clinical populations where nerve movement is believed to be compromised, it may be clinically prudent to avoid increases in shear strain as this may cause adverse effects from an already mechanosensitised nervous system. Keywords: Sciatic nerve, ultrasound, elastography Funding acknowledgements: Nil.

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  • Qualitative telephone interviews: Strategies for success

    Farooq, Muhammad Bilal (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The use of the telephone in qualitative interviews is discouraged by traditionalists who view it as an inferior data collection instrument. However these claims have not been supported by empirical evidence and qualitative researchers who have used and compared the telephone to the face-to-face mode of interviewing present a different story. This study attempts to build on the limited existing research comparing the issues involved and the data collected using the telephone and face-to-face interview modes. The study evaluates the criticisms of traditionalists in the light of existing research. The study then presents the observations of the researcher based on a research project that involved 43 telephone, 1 Skype and 6 face-to-face interviews. These observations as well as the limited prior research are used to develop strategies for the effective use telephone interviews in qualitative research. The study concludes that for certain studies the telephone if used with the strategies recommended here provides qualitative researchers with a sound data collection instrument.

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  • Nurturing Collaboration:Conservation Outcomes for Kea

    Roberts, Lorne; Orr-Walker, Tamsin; Adams, Nigel; Kemp, Joshua R. (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In 2009, the first in-situ kea population survey trials began under the coordination of the Kea Conservation Trust in partnership with Department of Conservation (DOC). Early census results from Nelson Lakes showed that kea density had declined significantly since a previous census a decade earlier. To ensure that mountain-top counts were coinciding with fledging times (the optimal life stage for survey work), a parallel project, Nest Monitoring, was developed. Motion sensor cameras and radio trackers were thus purchased and deployed during the next breeding season. The radio tags and cameras provided critical information on pest visitation to kea nests, confirmation of the breeding status of individual adults, fledging times, and nest survival. Three further years of nest data collection ensued on the back of this success. But how did this get off the ground? For a ‘fledgling’ conservation trust to finance and coordinate such a project, suitable collaborators had to be found and engaged. Private business backing was used as seed funding to secure larger Lotteries Grants. Additional corporate sponsorship supported successful grant applications to zoos, zoo organizations and other interested agencies. In-kind support by DOC and a huge number of volunteer man-hours have further contributed to this extremely successful collaborative project which is now in its fifth year. This paper looks at who came on board and why, and how this collaborative effort has resulted in positive conservation outcomes for one of New Zealand’s iconic species.

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  • FM Kiwi-style: the development of FM professionals in New Zealand

    Losekoot, E; Staal

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research paper conducts a review of the development of facilities management as a profession and some of the key moments in that journey. It then considers the situation of New Zealand, which has a number of characteristics such as a small population, relatively few large organisations which might make use of Facilities Management (FM) at a strategic level, and an understanding of FM which is more about operational rather than strategic issues. Through the tool of a ‘World-Café’ methodology during an FM Masterclass at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) with members of FMANZ, New Zealand’s FM professional association, key issues in the development of FM professionals in New Zealand are discussed and recommendations made. It is interesting to note that the issues of professional recognition, career pathways and academic qualifications are all issues raised in the literature and also by participants in the World-Café session held. This suggests that New Zealand’s FM professionals are progressing through the same ‘growing pains’ as their colleagues in Europe faced in the 1990s. However, it also shows that FM in New Zealand is probably some 15 years behind Europe. The authors recognise that some of the reasons for this may be caused by the above-mentioned New Zealand characteristics. In addition to working on the development and recognition of a domestic FM industry in New Zealand, the authors also suggest that much could be learned from other FM players globally. Opportunities for further research include case studies of successful organisations and the development of an educational framework for New Zealand.

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  • Entrepreneurial small New Zealand construction firms procuring non-incremental sustainable technology innovations

    Staal, A; Tookey, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Traditionally construction industries in New Zealand and abroad have a low track record for successful sustainable innovations. This has a negative impact on private and government spending, and on quality, society and the environment. This conceptual paper posits that the construction industry needs non-incremental (i.e. architectural, system, radical, modular) sustainable technology innovations to make drastic improvements. Such innovations often come from entrepreneurial (small) firms from other industries or at the beginning of supply chains and must be procured and adopted further into such chains. However, after an extensive literature review it remains unclear how entrepreneurial firms procure non-incremental sustainable technology innovations for the construction industry. The paper focuses on procurement activities of entrepreneurial firms in the New Zealand context. These activities interact with (internal and external) innovation activities for an optimal firm performance. They are affected by clusters of internal and external variables. The paper discusses extant literature, a conceptual framework, main propositions, research aims and the choice for a focus group method. It is part of a doctoral project.

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  • 'It’s just so bloody hard’ : recommendations for improving health interventions and maternity support services for disabled women

    Payne, Deborah; Guerin, Bernadette; McPherson, Kathryn; Roy, Dianne; Giddings, Lynne; Farquhar, Cindy (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Paucity of information about Aotearoa/New Zealand disabled women’s experiences of becoming mothers and the enablers and barriers they may face. • Overseas studies show that disabled women do encounter physical, attitudinal barriers. • Studies have also indicated that health professionals lack the knowledge and experience to provide appropriate care. • 2014 Maternity Consumer Survey found that disabled women were less satisfied overall with their maternity care in comparison to non- disabled women. Study aims 1. To investigate the experiences of women with either physical disabilities or sensory impairments in choosing whether to become mothers, including the barriers and facilitators to positive experiences of disabled motherhood; 2. To investigate the perspectives of health care professionals regarding the facilitators and barriers to providing best quality maternity and child care services for disabled women; and 3. To seek consensus on priority actions and strategies towards our overall aim of improving health outcomes for disabled women during pregnancy, childbirth and early childcare.

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  • The Two Towers : appraisal and leadership development for middle leaders

    Bassett, Martin; Robson, Joanne (2016-04)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    "Middle leaders" Two Towers : appraisal and leadership development Crisis in the "middle" - then & now So what? Now what?

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  • Osteopathic attitudes, knowledge and practices in melanoma screening

    Friedlander, Tim; Horgan, Carol; Hilton, Craig (2016-08-13)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Role for Osteopaths?  Osteopaths are Primary Practitioners  Osteopaths often see and examine patients in a state of undress  As health care providers, there is a likelihood that osteopaths can be trained to a good level of skill in melanoma screening  Early Detection Advisory Group (2006) recommends a programme to “increase knowledge about skin cancer, particularly melanoma, among other relevant health workers”

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  • Challenging positional authority : navigating leadership as collaboration

    Wrightson, Helen; Lee-Anne, Turton (2016-08-05)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Challenging positional authority Collective nature of leadership Kaupapa Māori model of leadership Building people’s capabilities Sustainable leadership Distributed leadership is transformational

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  • Managing Super Diverse Women Entrepreneurs in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Karmokar, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    New Zealand, like other countries, is becoming an increasingly multicultural society. Diversity of New Zealand has rapidly increased in the last ten years with 34 percent of the current population being Maori, Asian and Pacific community. We can see the reflection of super diversity in many areas of productivity, investment and particularly in innovation and entrepreneurial areas. Diversity has resulted in varied personal strengths such as language skills, social, cultural and international connections that can be channelled into entrepreneurship and easily transferable to New Zealand economy. New Zealand needs to adjust fast and invest in measures and programs to ensure we maximise the benefits of super diverse women population. These calls for a multi-voiced ``diversity'' discourse that would focus attention on the local demographics, cultural and political differences that adds value for entrepreneurial activities. As a country, New Zealand has acknowledged the influence of women on its growth and prosperity. Women entrepreneurs play a crucial role in country's economy, in terms of generating revenue and jobs, and creating an inclusive society; yet the entrepreneurial research to address diversity and promote entrepreneurial activities is largely invisible or marginal in mainstream entrepreneurship research. Despite a number of barriers, migrant women entrepreneurs are the fastest-growing group of business owners in advanced economies. In this paper, we aim to address the diversity of the women entrepreneurs and an attempt to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon by identifying and providing an overview of the possible barriers faced by diverse women entrepreneurs. It also explores challenges facing women entrepreneurs and various ethnic and cultural resources utilised by them to overcome such challenges. This paper will offer insights towards building a more inclusive framework for women’s entrepreneurship at a grass root level. Practical implication for future research and practice will be outlined.

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