6,373 results for Conference item

  • Professional development for established academic staff : the effectiveness of a writing programme

    Gremillion, Helen (2016-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Situate the writing programme in existing literature Describe participants and programme content Present some initial findings Review planned programme evaluation

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  • Encouraging young people into engineering

    Wilson, Hugh (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • The Information Designer Through the Lens of Design for Learning

    Potter, E

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    All effective information design helps people to access, understand, and use information, but not all information design is intended to help people learn. This paper examines instructional design—the activity of creating and developing learning experiences that meet learners’ needs—and places it as a lens through which to identify the key skills and personal attributes that information designers need to succeed in their field.

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  • Design Thinking Methods and Creative Technologies in Virtual Worlds

    Karmokar, S; Rive, P

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Globalization and the virtualization of business has highlighted the challenges of managing a dispersed team and have encouraged further research into the benefits of face-to-face communications and how that might be simulated in a virtual world. It is anticipated that high profile research and development projects, such as Oculus Rift, and High Fidelity, could see a revived interest in virtual reality and virtual worlds and how these could augment design thinking for online collaboration. The research project was informed by a review of the literature with relevance to design thinking, the virtual, co-design, human centered design, and tacit knowledge sharing. This research project examined how virtual teams could use prototype tools and modes of design thinking by geographically dispersed groups within a shared virtual space. More specifically, it examined how teams of creative technologies students both apply and learn design thinking, by creating and using collaborative tools, designed in a virtual world, to be used in a virtual learning environment. The undergraduate students studying a design major in business will be asked to engage in a transdisciplinary dialogue with students from another school of creative technologies using the context of a virtual world. The research follows a constructivist approach to teaching the business students design collaboration to review the benefits of face-to-face collaboration, and how that might be simulated online in a virtual world using those tools and methods. The study demonstrates innovation in a number of ways through virtual collaboration between diverse students of business and creative technologies using design thinking methods and methodology. The paper will also present how business students understand design thinking and illustrate the barriers to innovation in a virtual simulation through iterative prototyping virtual tools that encourage co-design and human centered design. The paper concludes with some findings from the data collected during the research project, with some early commentary and discussion of those findings.

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  • Application of nD BIM Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System (BIM-IKBMS) for Inspecting the Post-construction Energy Efficiency

    GhaffarianHoseini, A; Tookey, J; GhaffarianHoseini, AH

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The evolution of construction industry towards sustainability highlighted the absolute necessity to inspect sustainable performances throughout the post-construction building lifecycle. Correspondingly, application of relevant building management systems (BMS) to achieve this goal is mandatory (Ippolito, Riva Sanseverino, & Zizzo, 2014). In addition, conventional post-construction building inspection methods are outdated and less effective. Therefore; this research aims to propose specific utilization of BIM during building maintenance for the consequential post-construction energy efficiency. Contemporarily, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is considered as a leading technology capable of being utilized in Architecture, Engineering, Construction (AEC) practices highlighting its critical role in enhancing the effectiveness of project delivery from conceptual initiation to eventualization and even post-construction maintenance (Ding, Zhou, & Akinci, 2014; Volk, Stengel, & Schultmann, 2014). Alternatively, despite the recent presentation of BIM to the AEC industry, it has widely emerged to an undisputedly contributive technology towards advancement of AEC implementations. Furthermore, BIM’s capability of nD project integrations has prominently highlighted its potential effectiveness while being accurately incorporated with sustainable performances (Farr, Piroozfar, & Robinson, 2014). Moreover, researchers have highlighted that information gathering and modelling through BIM can reduce respective building energy consumptions (Lawrence et al., 2012). The remarkable proportion of global energy consumption by the construction industry has fundamentally driven the concentration on decreasing the building energy consumption via amplified sensor data and improved computational support for building controls (Klein et al., 2012). Subsequently, it is vital to balance the maximization of building energy efficiency and users’ desired level of comfort while employing an efficient BMS for sustainable maintenance of facility operations overstressing the implication of post-construction building inspection. Researchers have overstressed that application of an efficient Facility Maintenance and Management systems (FMM) enables executives to detect problems primarily and sustain the facility more effectively (Chen, Hou, & Wang, 2013). On the other hand, the conventional inspection method of progress tracking practice would solely rely on manual visual assessments and periodical respective reports. This progress consisted of logs and checklists manually prepared to indicate the project’s level of adaptability with the required milestones and specifications (Bosché, Ahmed, Turkan, Haas, & Haas, 2014). Effectiveness and accuracy of the corresponding inspection progress would have been affected based on the individual’s personal judgment and observational skills. Additionally, high probability of inaccurate manual building inspections plus the lack of real-time input of dynamic factors urges development of automated BMS. Therefore, Building Information Modelling (BIM) plays a key role towards automation in construction and corresponding management systems. However, adequate skills; competence and enthusiasm of construction role-players and contractors is a significantly important issue towards future success of such propositions (Miettinen & Paavola, 2014). Additionally, the progression of AEC building delivery includes design, construction, contracting and maintenance. This complex process, engaging multi-layer and multi-domain information storage and exchange, necessitates integrative contributions from versatile and incorporative professional teams thus; competent information sharing among players is a critical factor towards success therefore; a proposed BIM system capable of resolving AEC interoperability complications would remarkably enhance the overall project output and respectively the building energy efficiency throughout its lifecycle (Dong, O'Neill, & Li, 2014). Despite the nD capability of BIM enabling its potential practice during versatile building lifecycle phases, designers-contractors focused primarily on the application of BIM during design-construction management stages. Furthermore, positive prospects of BIM’s potential to be applied throughout the post-construction energy efficiency enhancements can be augmented while highlighting the conceivable successful utilization of BIM during corrective building maintenance management concerns compared to preventive concerns (Motawa & Almarshad, 2013). Moreover, integration of knowledge management systems empowering handling and sharing of respective building maintenance information over the building lifecycle is an inevitable essential during post-construction sustainable performances. Harmoniously, contemporary sustainable developments incorporate advancement of exploiting the aforementioned practices. Congruently, focusing on the building energy efficiency, this article suggests engagement of an Integrated Knowledge-based Building Management System using nD BIM applications (BIM-IKBMS) during the post-construction building lifecycle to advance the implementation of sustainable building performances.

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  • Beyond the classroom: an investigation into eLearning to create a blended eLearning environment

    Sinfield, D

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research project looked at the possibilities of engaging students and teachers in out-of-class communicating to enhance the learning and teaching environment and to involve graphic design staff working as a team to introduce new technologies into learning and teaching approaches, with associated curriculum development. This was seen as engaging with an online ePortfolio area that was specifically tailored for the students so that they could communicate with each other and the tutor of the class. There was also the need for the students to up-load their project designs to ascertain critique from their peers and tutors whilst away from class. This would have several benefits as feedback could be given outside of the classroom, making the precious time in class much more fulfilling and productive whilst creating a collaborative design community. It will also enable teaching material to be available to students for independent learning in online and downloadable formats and will enable teaching staff to concentrate on developing concepts, while allowing students to develop as independent, engaged learners. Existing public platforms were considered (Facebook, Tumblr, Wordpress, Twitter, Blogged, etc.) but sites such as these although good in content and functionality did cause several concerns from both tutors and students alike. It was established that an internal university ePortfolio area be used for the purposes of this project. This lead to the investigation of what was on offer within the university in terms of availability and support.

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  • Optimisation of power transmission systems using a discrete Tabu Search method

    Connor, AM; Tilley, DG (2014-04-07)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents a brief description of the Tabu Search method and shows how it can be applied to two different power transmission systems. Examples are presented from two transmission systems. In the first example a mechanical transmission system is considered. A four bar mechanism is synthesised in order to produce a desired output motion. The second example is a hydrostatic transmission operating under closed loop control in order to maintain a constant operating speed as the loading conditions change.

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  • An overview of the practice of IT governance

    Asgarkhani, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Investment on Information Technology (IT) solutions in most organizations accounts for the largest component of capital expenditure. Even though there are at times conflicting views on value and return regarding investment on IT, in general, there is consensus amongst strategists, planning advisors and many researchers that Investment in IT can bring significant value to business. Value is added through improved productivity, increased efficiency, profitability, better communication, more effective decision making and customer satisfaction. However, in order to maximize benefits and value gained from investment on IT, it is universally acknowledged that IT must be fully aligned with overall business strategies and direction. As capital investment on IT continues to grow, IT managers and strategists are expected to develop and put in practice effective decision making models (frameworks) that improve decision-making processes for the use of IT in organizations and optimize the investment on ICT solutions. More specifically, there is an expectation that organizations not only maximize the benefits of adopting IT solutions but also avoid the many pitfalls that are associated with rapid introduction of technological change. Different organizations depending on size, complexity of solutions required and processes used for financial management may use different techniques for managing strategic investment on IT solutions. Corporate IT governance encompasses the necessary organisational structures and processes to ensure the alignment of IT and business occurs whilst at the same time minimising any associated risks. Decision making processes for strategic use of IT within organizations are often referred to as IT Governance (or Corporate IT Governance). This research through examining and analysing recent studies aims to identify key factors for effective IT governance. The many benefits of IT governance are discussed along with suggestions for why implementation of governance systems can fail. The study examines IT governance as a tool for best practice in decision making on strategic use of IT. The study is concerned with phase I of a project intended to identify key components and success factors. It establishes that the practice of IT governance, depending on complexity of IT solutions, size of organization and organization’s stage of maturity in using IT varies significantly within various organizations. It can range from informal approaches to sophisticated formal frameworks. It is confirmed that there is no one standard framework for IT Governance that suits all organizations. Ownership and direction prove to be amongst essential elements to successful implementation of governance practices. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities tied with clear communication and continual senior management involvement were highlighted as significant success factors.

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  • Corporate ICT governance: A tool for ICT best practice

    Askgarkhani, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, investment on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solution in most organizations is the largest component of capital expenditure. As capital investment on ICTs continues to grow, ICT managers and strategists are expected to develop and put in practice effective decision making models (frameworks) that improve decision-making processes for the use of ICTs in organizations and optimize the investment on ICT solutions. To be exact, there is an expectation that organizations not only maximize the benefits of adopting ICT solutions but alos avoid the many pitfalls that are associated with rapid introduction of technological change. Different organizations depending on size, complexity of solutions required and processes used for financial management and budgeting may use different techniques for managing strategic investment on ICT solutions. Decision making processes for strategic use of ICTs within organizations are often referred to as ICT Goverance (or Corporate ICT Governance). This paper examines ICT governance - as a tool for best practice in decision making about ICT Governance. Discussions in this paper represent phase 1 of a project which was initiated to investigate trends in strategic decision making about ICT strategies. Phase 1 is concerned mainly with review of literature and a number of case studies. It establishes that the practice of ICT goverance, depending on complexity of ICT solutions, organizations size and organizations stage of maturity varies significantly - from informal approaches to sophisticated formal frameworks.

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  • The City in a Different Light: rethinking the political through education by means of performance by people with intellectual disabilities

    McCaffrey, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the fatal earthquake of February 22nd 2011 Different Light Theatre company started meeting again on March 13th. Although the theatre space in which we held weekly classes, workshops and rehearsals was, like a lot of buildings, closed at that time, we were able to meet at the International Buddhist Centre on Riccarton Road. At the time a large part of the motivation for meeting so soon after the quake was in a way an attempt at ‘normalization’ in an extraordinary situation. We felt that the performers needed the routine of the classes or rehearsals to continue, amidst the disruption caused by the quake damage and aftershocks.

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  • Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education

    Proctor, M.; Atkins, C.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Smith, H.; Trounson, R.; Sutton, K.; Benson, N.; Dyke, S.; McCarthy, C.; Otto, M.; Nicoll, C. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper defines a proposed set of Agile Principles for Tertiary Computing Education as developed through an Agile Education workshop held during the annual Computing South Island Educators’ (CSIE) forum. The purpose of the workshop was to explore innovative and ‘Agile’ approaches that have been used within our South Island institutions to consider whether the principles of Agile development could be usefully applied or adapted to tertiary computing education. Each case study was analysed to determine alignment with Agile principles and emerging themes in the application of these principles to tertiary computing education were identified and discussed. This led to the development of a proposed set of Agile principles for tertiary computing education to support the development of computing courses, course components and programmes. Meaningful learning has emerged as a key factor for further exploration

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  • The game’s the thing: Levelling up from novice status

    McCarthy, D P.; Oliver, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Quality computer engineering education is integral to the recruitment, retention, and employment of quality software engineers, as part of enabling a greater uptake of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers. The introductory programing course DICT440 uses Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB) and the team creation of a game, Theseus and the Minotaur, to teach introductory programing principles and skills. This paper argues that creativity is essential to innovation. Digital Games are being increasingly used in education and training internationally, as well as specifically in computer education. Aotearoa-New Zealand ITPs need to position themselves positively to leverage the creativity and motivation of software engineering students who are experienced gamers by developing games as part of teaching and learning software engineering. Computer game development courses can be developed collaboratively in a multi-disciplinary team, using appropriate learning theory, across ITPs in second and third year degree courses, in conjunction with regional game companies, alongside core business applications.

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  • Student mistakes in an introductory programming course: Sample problems

    Sarkar, A.; Lopez, M.; Lance, M.; Oliver, R.; Xu, L. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Learning to program is a challenging task for novice learners. This study aimed to investigate students’ concepts as they were being formed. To capture these, we chose to focus on students who made some mistakes in basic concepts. Our study sought to capture students’ conceptions at a very early stage in their study: five weeks into an introductory programming course. We invited students who did not pass an early mastery test at their first attempt to participate in a diagnostic and remedial session. In this session, the teaching team carried out one-on-one interviews with students to diagnose any misconceptions the students exhibited and devise individual remedial learning. The teaching team documented these interviews and these formed the basis of our phenomenographic analysis. Our main finding was that the lack of success in the test was attributable more to application of process than to conceptual misunderstandings. We also found that the technique of inviting students who do not succeed in a test to participate in a in-depth diagnostic interview and one-on-one remedial instruction was useful, even though no major misconceptions or alternative conceptions were identified.

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  • Computer gaming and the positive effects on mental health

    McCarthy, C. M.; McBrearty, B. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 1970 a popular New Zealand student capping show was entitled “1 in 5” based on the then common expression “1 in 5 of us is mad”. In 2011 the New Zealand Mental Health reported exactly the same mental health statistics; 41 years on nothing had changed. However, other changes had taken place during that time – the advent of and continued development of the computer game. This poster paper explores the direct correlation between computer gaming and mental health and, in particular, the positive effects of computer gaming on mental health.

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  • Analysis of prerequisites: Methodology and a case study

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D.; McCarthy, C.; Oliver, R. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    It is well known that it is dangerous to infer causation from correlation. However, the mantra that correlation does not imply causation can lead to some researchers believing that formal inference is never possible from a correlational study. This paper presents a theoretical framework, a conceptual framework and a methodology for establishing formal inference from the analysis of prerequisites in an educational context. This is important in education because some prior knowledge is often required for success in any topic or course. The method is illustrated with a case study that investigates the effectiveness of a level four certificate as preparation for further study. The case study identified the unique contribution to subsequent performance made by individual courses in the certificate. It also identified the specific courses in subsequent study which were most affected by the certificate courses. We conclude that the approach can indeed enable formal inference from a correlational study.

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  • Students’ perceptions of work quality in a cooperative learning environment

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study investigates students’ perceptions of their own work and that of others, and how these change as students work cooperatively in small groups in an active learning environment. We incorporated formal feedback into a learning cycle in which students researched topics and presented their findings to peers in small groups. We then used custom computer software to capture this feedback and students’ perceptions of the work and record these in a database. We then analysed these data to investigate students’ perception of the quality of the work, its usefulness, and the extent to which they trusted the accuracy of its findings. We found that student self-assessment and peer assessment were similar and both were relatively lenient compared to a tutor assessment. However, students with higher achievement were more severe in their self-assessment than those at lower achievement levels. We also found that perceptions did not change as the course progressed. This last finding was surprising and suggests that the students were not reflecting on the feedback they received and then acting on it to modify their approach to future research.

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  • Staff and student perceptions of NZQA level expectations

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed 89 students from four courses to elicit their expectations of the nature of the skills and knowledge, and the degree of self-management and collaboration, which was required for their courses. We compared their responses to the expectations set out in the New Zealand Qualifications Framework. We also sampled a small number (6) of lecturers and compared their expectations to those of students and the framework. We found significant differences between student and framework expectations, with student expectations noticeably lower than the framework. Moreover, student expectations remained at a low level, even in higher level courses, and the gap was wider at the higher levels. We also found significant differences between student and lecturer expectations. Lecturer expectations were broadly between those of students and the framework, which suggests that lecturer expectations are a compromise between both of these. Any misalignment of expectations poses a challenge for educators. We suggest practical measures for aligning these expectations.

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  • Relationships between logic depiction, UML diagramming and programming

    Sarkar, A.; Lance, M.; Lopez, M.; Oliver, R. (2012)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Beginning programmers are often taught to design algorithms in pseudo code, a structured form of English, before implementing the algorithms in code. This approach is often advocated because it is seen as enabling programmers, and especially novice programmers, to reason about program logic without the distraction of the specific syntax of a programming language, and because it can be used as a basis for program documentation. Similar arguments are often given for the use of UML diagrams. In recent semesters, we have trialled the programming language Scratch as an alternative to structured English for pseudo code. This paper uses assessment data to investigate the relationship between pseudo code (both structured English and Scratch programs), UML, and programming ability. We found a consistent and strong relationship between programming and UML diagramming skills, but a relatively weak relationship between programming and either form of pseudo code. These findings lead us to question the value of teaching pseudo code and our motives for teaching it.

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  • Evaluating the distraction of ICT devices in the classroom

    Goundar, S.; Clear, A.; Lopez, M. (2012)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Information Communication Technology (ICT) devices such as laptops, smartphones, and tablets, have become the standard stationery of today's tertiary students. Many years ago, the standard stationery required was a writing notepad and ball point pen, and a brain. These were all that was needed (along with some attention) to take in and store what was being taught by the teacher. Ubiquitous ICT technology has changed all that and the “stationery” requirements of today's tertiary scholars are far more cognitively penetrating; they are demanding of one's attention and highly pervasive in the learning environment. With tertiary institutions, teachers and students still in existence, the question that needs to be addressed is: how does the availability of such ubiquitous technology impact on students’ learning, our teaching and the future of tertiary institutions? Formal systematic research on the distraction of ICT devices in tertiary education classrooms in New Zealand is relatively limited; therefore, this research intends to explore the issue. This paper will show that they have dramatically changed the ecology of education from "learner-plus-learning-material" into "learner-plus-learning-material-plus-technology-plus-distraction".

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  • The Christchurch quake: Social networking as student support in disaster recovery

    McCarthy, D.; McCarthy, C. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Following the “Greendale Fault” Earthquake of 7.1 on 4 September, 2010 in Christchurch, New Zealand, students at the local Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) were significantly disrupted in their second semester. Occurring at 4.35am on the Saturday morning after only two weeks of courses, the ITP found itself cordoned off and part of an inner city curfew as older less well maintained buildings were reduced to rubble around it. Aftershocks continued but relatively little damage was sustained to the ITP’s buildings. Students and staff were unable to attend study or work, and the situation was rapidly changing from day to day. However, students were affected differently depending on their location at the time of the quake, their access to communication technologies such as cell phones, the Internet, and their personal circumstances. Then the entire situation repeated itself with the 6.3 “Lyttelton Fault” aftershock at 12.51pm on 22 February, 2011 disrupting Semester One on only the second day of the semester. This paper blends two qualitative methods, actor network theory (ANT) and narrative research to show the degree to which computing students accessed an online course to tell their stories, participate in social networking, and relied upon the School of Computing Moodle Student Info site in the recovery period immediately after the first disaster, and comparing this process over the “Greendale Fault” and the “Lyttelton Fault” events.

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