6,236 results for Conference item

  • Managing operational continuity in disaster recovery: A case in academic delivery

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the experience related to planning approaches that were undertaken to continue delivery of Information and Communication Technologies qualifications at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after the 22 February earthquake. It reflects on challenges, phases of planning for commencing delivery and key success factors.

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  • Using academic research methodologies to improve the quality of teaching: A case study

    McEwan, W. (2001)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A contract for the European Space Agency (ESA) was carried out by the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, to study the performance of the protocols (particularly TCP/IP) used within the ESA funded CODE satellite communication system (Fairhurst, Ord et al. 1993; Fairhurst, McEwan, et al. 1993; Fairhurst, et al. 1994). As part of that study, data was collected from the routers connected to the VSAT terminal equipment using the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). The analysis of data gathered from that experiment, and the later comparison of some of the methodologies used, formed part of a M.Sc. Engineering by research thesis published by the author of this paper (2000). The present paper does not particularly concern itself with the results of the above research. Rather, it is intended to illustrate that the experimental methodologies, devised for a leading academic research project undertaken at postgraduate level, can at times be later used to improve the quality of teaching and research at degree level and below. This is contrary to the common but ill-conceived notion that such academic research is overly esoteric and thus somehow unrelated and of no benefit to the more down-to-earth realities of general teaching. Within this paper some of the practical details of the methodology used in the CODE experiment will be described. This will include the hardware internetwork configurations used during both the “live” satellite data communication link (an expensive resource) and a similar configuration using a “Satellite Link Simulator (SLS)” during the majority time when the live link was unavailable. Following the model of the above research, the School of Computing at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) has recently begun work on the creation of an in-house data communications research and teaching laboratory. Although this is in its early stages of formation this presentation will show that parts of its design are derived directly from the above CODE experiments. In addition, some software simulations used in the CODE experiments will be briefly described along with our plans for using similar software simulations in student research project work.

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  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

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  • Fostering online student interaction using the OB3 web application for online study

    Daellenbach, R.; Davies, L.; Kensington, M.; Tamblyn, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The School of Midwifery at CPIT in Christchurch is undertaking an action research study on midwifery students and blended learning that commenced in 2010. This paper focusses on one aspect of this research which is the student’s experience of social isolation whilst working through the online component of the blended delivery. In response the teaching team initiated an intervention as a result, and replaced the existing content authoring software tool with a system that enables students to engage and interact with each other more effectively. We subsequently adopted the OB3 web application which has ameliorated this problem to a large extent. This paper sets out to explain why the OB3 web application was chosen and what effect this has had in terms of the student’s learning and the educators’ teaching experiences. Keywords: Asynchronous discussions, blended learning, cooperative learning, online learning

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  • Industry view of ICT roles and skills: needs in Canterbury

    Asgarkhani, M.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the ICT skills needs within both Canterbury region and New Zealand. ICTs play a crucial role in today’s knowledge-based economy. Organizations heavily rely on ICT solutions to develop and grow business. There is an increasing need for ICT skills within organizations – so as to benefit from the use of ICT tools and solutions. A focus group of industry representatives participated in this study – to identify the need for roles and skills within the ICT sector. It appears that there are consistencies in both the need for roles and the use of development platforms for the Canterbury region and all regions of New Zealand. That is to say, ICT qualifications designed to address national needs should address majority of ICT needs within the Canterbury region.

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  • Improving existing resources for interactive learning activities using tablets and touch screens

    Robson, D.; Kennedy, D. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As creating resources for interactive technology-based learning activities can be a huge task, we investigated how existing resources can be used and modified. Data were collected from students, observer, and teacher for several problems in a mathematics course on a computing degree that were part of interactive learning activities using touch screen technologies. It was found that existing problems could become effective resources in these activities simply by modifying them with suitable formatting, and that locating related elements together helped students start a problem. However, it is also important that pedagogical principles are followed.

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  • Experimenting with web-based course management applications - as a tool for sharing research information and promoting research

    Asgarkhani, M.; Weir, D. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years, there has been a major shift in the New Zealand tertiary education marketplace - more specifically, with Polytechnics offering degree programs alongside other qualifications that they have been making readily available. It is now necessary for them to be able to demonstrate that they are capable of conducting research - more specifically, in providing support, making resources and funding available and promoting a research-orientated culture. Polytechnics across New Zealand have applied various tools and techniques in order to promote and encourage research. This paper outlines the results of an experiment with Blackboard (a Web-based course management tool) as a tool for promoting research and scholarly activities.

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  • Key attributes for success within the ICT job market: a case study of ICT students' view

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on attributes that are seen as being critical to success within the ICT sector roles. The required attributes as identified by a study of 205 randomly selected ICT roles have been compared with students’ perception (based on the preliminary results of a study of one student focus group). Overall, there were difficulties in drawing clear conclusions from the outcome of one case study only. However, we were able to identify some key issues in both agreements and mismatches on winning attributes for future studies.

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  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

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  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

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  • Belbin team roles, organisational patterns and eLearning: a case study

    Gibson, A.; Nesbit, T. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2004 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) embarked on a project to develop eLearning content for a number of modules from the Certificate in Computing (CIC) that is overseen by the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The purpose of this paper is to describe the process that was used to manage the development team and the key issues that arose, how Belbin Team Roles as described in Belbin (1981) could have been applied at the inception of the project, and how the use of organisational patterns as described in Coplien and Harrison (2005) could have been applied in making decisions about how the team would function. The paper identifies how some aspects of Belbin Team Roles were extremely helpful in the managing of the team, how some organisational patterns confirm different aspects of how the team was managed, and that had other organisational patterns been applied at the start of the project some aspects of the overall project would have been improved and enhanced.

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  • 80% of what? - a preliminary investigation of tutors' understanding of the 80% pass mark for DipBC modules

    Kennedy, D.; Ross, J. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    “I don’t take an awful lot of notice of the 80% thing” Tutor comment. As new people are recruited to join the many teams of NDBC teaching staff throughout the country, “old timers” attempt to explain the concept of mastery that is supposed to form the basis of assessment procedures in the various modules. The concept is described in the NZQA approved document, commonly known as the Bluebook, which details the NDBC, and other, qualification requirements. In that document, a figure of 80% is suggested as a guideline pass mark for assessments which concern knowledge-based modules. This paper focuses on the meaning of that 80% guideline since, for many, both the explanation and the practice of assessing mastery provide a hurdle with an element of mystery. We attempt to unravel some of the mystery by examining what the current practice is in one Polytechnic and to suggest that our methods may be forcing a dumbing down of assessments which target the comprehension sections of modules. The descriptors for the diploma modules categorise the learning required for each module using the RCAP model. It seems that even with Recall sections some tutors have trouble relating the 80% to the assessment. The Application and Problem Solving areas have largely become the things we assess using assignments. This paper examines how the 80% pass mark is being applied to assignments and to the comprehension elements of various courses, for it is in these areas of cognitive processing that competency (or 80%of competency) is harder to establish particularly in areas of original, creative thought. The paper raises the question of honesty of assessment practices in terms of marking guides and suggests that we should be insisting on using both appropriate tools for generating valid evidence and appropriate means of judging student performance against a course’s learning outcomes, rather than trying to force pass marks to add up to 80%.

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  • RelaxNG with XML data structures

    Kennedy, D. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML mark-up is used in a wide range of applications and in particular for data transfer via the Internet. XML textbooks and web-based tutorials typically introduce XML mark-up by the use of examples and the rules for well-formed XML, e.g. XML Tutorial. According to this popular presentation at W3schools.com the development of a DTD or schema is done after a document instance has been marked up. An XML document is a data structure. This paper proposes a methodology for XML mark-up that begins with data analysis by using a type of structure diagram (an elm tree diagram) then describes the data structure and content using Relax NC (an easier to use alternative to DTD or XML Schema) and finally does the mark-up of document instances. The instruction effectiveness and the efficiency of the different approaches are compared for two occurrences of a 3rd year degree paper.

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  • Database design and the reality of normalisation

    Kennedy, D. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    What is normalisation all about? Why do we teach it? How do we teach it? How can we explain normalisation to our students so that they will understand it? This paper presents a method of teaching normalisation that, experience has shown, students can understand. The paper also considers the broader questions of: ¨ Why is normalisation important? ¨ Where does it fit in the process of database design? ¨ How important is it in the “real world”? Database design can be done using an entity relationship diagram (ERD) - a top down approach or by normalisation of sets of data - a bottom up approach The question is, What do real database designers do? ¨ What methodologies do they use? ¨ How important is normalisation? ¨ What normalisation rules do they use i.e. how far do they take it? ¨ How important is denormalisation? This paper presents a summary of findings, from interviews with database designers, that should help us in our teaching of Database design.

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  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

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  • The feedback loop: encouraging student submissions

    Kennedy, D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The use of a network of tablet PCs to teach a first year computing degree mathematics class has shown that students value the learning involved in seeing other student’s submissions and the teacher comments on these as well as comments on their own submissions. The lecturers value receiving responses from many of the students and not just the few who always answer. This paper discusses the use of an active learning pedagogy, student submissions, and feedback in a database class based in a standard PC computer laboratory. Instructor perceptions and student reactions to this pedagogy are discussed. Student reactions were collated from a questionnaire. In spite of many technical problems both lecturers and students reported benefits for teaching and learning.

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  • An example of teaching journeyman level programming: XML conversion of course descriptors

    Lance, M. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper evaluates object-oriented design features used in an application that converts course descriptors from text to xml. The discussion of design features of the application is presented as an example of the sort of teaching activity needed to bridge the gap between initial exposure to object oriented programming in a specialized environment and the final journeyman learning experience achieved by a capstone project.

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  • DDSWG: direct digital synthesis waveform generator

    Bright. M. J.; Li, Y. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper discusses the development of a direct digital synthesis waveform generator as a forty week project, contributing to over thirty percent of a BEngTech student’s final year grades. The waveform generator uses a numerically controlled oscillator to digitally synthesize standard and arbitrary waveforms up to a frequency of 5MHz, with adjustable output voltage ranging from 5mV(p-p) to 10V(p-p) and DC offset between 5VDC. The 32-bit phase accumulator and the 8-bit phase to amplitude converter were implemented within programmable logic Xilinx’s Spartan-IIE FPGA. With the success of implementing the digital section of the DDS waveform generator and the design flexibility of VHDL and FPGAs, four DDS waveform generators have been synthesized within the FPGA, each with independent wave shape, frequency, and phase control.

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  • Where's the bling of the thing? Ethics, gaming and PBL-1

    McCarthy, D. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes an evaluation of PBL-Interactive (PBL-I), an authoring tool for an ethical decision making game, within the Dip ICT course, ET600 Ethics and professionalism, at Christchurch Polytechnic, Institute of Technology, (CPIT). The tool was developed through the e-Learning Collaborative Development Fund (eCDF) for use in online and face to face delivery. While the prototype was developed and the usability testing conducted with student volunteers returned positive results, the limitations of the authoring tool in a multilinear gaming environment outweighed its affordances. In particular, the authoring mode interface lacked ease of use and functionality for advanced features such as video and audio required to develop multiple ethical choices to motivate students with advanced gaming experience in online and face to face learning environments.

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  • To what extent are Maori studying ICT? The policy implementation gap?

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Maori are studying ICT at a disproportionate rate. Maori make up 15% of the New Zealand population yet Maori school leavers are trailing the success tables and despite the advent of the Wananga, Maori tertiary students (aged 18 to 24) are declining (Social Report, 2007). Recent government reports are also identifying Maori as having a low level of involvement in ICT (NZ Government Executive, 2000). With the approval of CPIT’s Kaiarahi, this paper examines the current literature on this issue. It also examines the responsibilities under the Treaty of Waitangi, gives a brief overview and analysis of the government policies and strategies involved, and looks at how these responsibilities, policies and strategies are working in practice. Finally this paper suggests the need for in-depth collaborative applied research – both at a local and a national level.

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