6,619 results for Conference item

  • Management for success in eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to further explore the management skills that are needed in eCommerce organisations. Nesbit (2001a, 2001b) began an exploration that was largely based on the work of Davis and Hajnal (1998) who had identified a number of management skills that are perceived as being important. The main aim of this paper is to identify which skills are perceived as being the most important in a wider range of organisations. This was achieved by conducting a survey of eCommerce organisations in New Zealand, with the aim of answering the following research question: “What are the management skills that a sample of eCommerce organisations perceive to the most critical to success?” The results of this research point to the most important skills and competencies being of a strategic nature. The analysis showed that, for the sample of covered by the questionnaire, a group of skills and competencies of a strategic nature are significantly more important than a group of skills and competencies that are of a technical and operational nature.

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  • Developing and running a photographic website

    Nesbit, T.; Oliver, R.; Hancock, M.; Nesbit, G. (2005)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes how a website was successfully developed for a Wellington-based photography business by a student completing the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology during 2004. The business specialises in photography of athletics and other sporting events throughout New Zealand, and it had been identified that a website that allowed the easy uploading of photos by the business so that customers could order copies would enhance the operations of the business. A group of students developed an initial prototype of the website as part of course work in the first semester of 2004 as an initial feasibility test and requirements gathering process. Two of these students developed the concept further as part of their cooperative education project at the end of that semester. A third student redeveloped the site in semester two of 2004 with the purpose of the site going live before the end of 2004. The site was launched successfully in late 2004.

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  • Transnational education - the students coming onshore: a case study

    Baker, A.; Nesbit, T. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Since 2001 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) has taught the first two tears of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree at four vocational colleges in Beijing, China. The students study for three years as the computing content is combined with a year of English language study. After passing the three years study in Beijing the students graduate with a Diploma of Computing (Level 6) and they are eligible to complete the final year of the BICT at CPIT. Students’ who articulate to the BICT often require extra English tuition, find our educational model foreign and they often feel pressured by the expectations of their family in China. CPIT academic staff, who teach on the third year of the degree, have noticed a change in class dynamics as these ‘new to CPIT’ students require additional support in many cases. The students have little independent learning skills and require nurturing initially to get them comfortable with the CPIT way of life. In spite of the problems faced by the students and staff the success rate of these students is reasonably close to the success rate of other students in the final year of the BICT degree.

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  • The ICT journey from diplomas to degrees: the CPIT staircasing experience

    Nesbit, T.; McCarthy, C. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore aspects of the pathways from diploma level study in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to degree level study in ICT. The aspects explored include the role that such pathways play for students who for a variety of reasons did not enter degree level study upon leaving the school education system and to evaluate their success rates when they transferred to degree level study mid way through their degree. Over seventy (70 students) who have completed the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology Level 6 (DipICT L6) have transferred into the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology since 2002. These students are exempted from completing 180 credits of the 360 credits that are required for the BICT degree. This paper compares the success rates of these students in the BICT courses that they complete with the success rates of students who entered the BICT degree at year one and draws the conclusions that these students have success rates that are on a par with those of other students in the BICT degree and that the Staircasing arrangement that is in place is successful.

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  • Rationalising Student Numbers in Degree and Diploma Courses: The CPIT Experience

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) delivers both its three year BICT degree and the two year level 6 DipICT programme in parallel with sufficient student numbers to justify the two separate programmes. Both qualifications even go so far as to have three areas of specialisation or streams – network administration, programming and multimedia. However, from time to time, there have been subject areas in one or both of the two programmes specialisation areas that have been low enough to make it difficult to justify to CPIT administrators running some of these courses. The fact that these subject areas were required by industry became increasingly difficult to satisfy the administrators’ requirements to meet budgetary constraints. The Programme Leaders of the two programmes of study examined ways and means to provide students with a range of course and specialisation choices that also satisfied industry’s need for graduates and the administrators’ budgetary compliance requirements. This paper looks at the various proposals created by the two Programme Leaders over the past two years.

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  • Computer modelling and simulation as a learning tool: a preliminary study of network simulation products

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, computer simulation plays a significant role in the process of decisionmaking and planning. Furthermore, it can act as an effective tool for learning, teaching and training. Educating and training learners in the field of communications and Web enabling technologies can be a costly exercise – as theory often needs to be supported by handson practice in workshops or labs. In this case, computer simulation products can often prove to be an alternative cost-effective solution. This paper introduces a methodology for evaluating such products and discusses the results of a preliminary study of a number of options that are currently available within the marketplace.

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  • ICT4D: A model for engagement with indigenous communities for ICT-enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Technology implementations in remote areas of South America, and, for that matter, other parts of the developing world have had limited success or final benefit for the recipients. In one particular case in the remote Peruvian Andes, a New Zealand team engaged with the local population to form an approach for rolling out the Internet with the result being one of the highest uptakes of technology in Peru and a huge benefit for the recipient communities. The approach, or method, developed for the project has been called “Community Centric Empowerment” (CCE). This paper outlines the reasons for the development of the methodology, describes its elements and how it was applied in the implementation of technology in the developing world.

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  • The Capstone Project - a foundation for work?

    Wieck, M. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper represents an attempt to gauge the effectiveness of the student work placement that forms a compulsory part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) taught at Christchurch Polytechnic Institution of Technology (CPIT). In this paper, the effectiveness will be judged in terms of how well it appears to prepare students for work within the IT industry. A survey is used given to students to establish how well they felt prepared for the workplace before and after the project and hence how they feel the placement contributes to their preparedness. Two areas are examined; specific, technical preparedness and more general competencies such as time-management, interpersonal or social skills. The study is not exhaustive, but responses are believed to reasonably represent a majority of BICT students both past and present. Further study along this path will incorporate more detailed analysis of how the employers and academic supervisors feel the project affected the student’s knowledge and skill formation.

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  • Teaching computing and provision of IT support: a bridge too far?

    Wieck, M.; McPhee, J. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper evaluated existing models of IT support for providers of ICT tertiary education and training and other organisations. It looked at the support afforded by IT infrastructure in meeting the needs of teaching staff and their ability to deliver courses of instruction. By contrast, different models of support were examined from industry in terms of their applicability to the particular needs of the tertiary education sector. The findings so far have identified a useful basis for comparison of IT infrastructure effectiveness and highlighted likely areas of difficulty. It concludes with a discussion of alternative models of provision of IT services ending with recommendations for a more appropriate model that better reflects the particular needs of the academic environment.

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  • Literature review on online assessment authentication

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While it is acknowledged that much more has been written on this subject than can be reviewed here, every effort has been made to search for and review those works that were deemed by the author and others to have the closest relationship to the issues of online assessment and authentication of such online assessment when developing online courses and programmes of study at CPIT.

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  • The revision of a database course - The process and the result

    Nesbit, T.; Kennedy, D. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Practical database skills such as a working knowledge of SQL, data analysis and database design are recognised as important and useful skills. However a traditional database course that is assessed using a theory-based exam, a research assignment, and two practical assignments still allows many students to pass who subsequently show that they have minimal practical skills. This paper describes the redesign of a database course in the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) that emphasises practical skills and assessments that require students to demonstrate that they have gained these skills. The processes used were a literature review that covered what other writers have identified as being important skills, a review of student comments regarding the application of the content of the course to their capstone projects and a review of the database needs of other second and third year courses in the degree. The result of this process saw the introduction of a revised course where there was little change to the content that was covered, but a change in emphasis to ensure that students who pass the course had at least mastered the basic skills of SQL and had greater exposure to the design and implementation of relational databases.

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: an end-user perspective

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

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  • ACEing the delivery of technical content online

    Lyons, M.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There are many issues involved when it comes to the online delivery of technical content, particularly content that involves information and communications technology (ICT). McCarthy and Ross (2005) described and analysed an eLearning initiative where the students enrolled in a programme of study were brought together for block courses from geographically dispersed locations. One of the reasons for doing this was to enable some of the higher end technical content to be delivered in a more efficient manner as some of this content required student to have access to multiple operating environments that might not have been possible in their home situation. The use of virtual machine technology for delivering such aspects has been described, analysed and explored by Watson and Correia (2004) and others and has provided a sound solution for situations like this. Martin and Nesbit (2007) have explore the notion of context when it comes to eLearning and the importance of recognising the different aspects of context with these including the differing comprehension levels, preferred learning styles and cognitive abilities of the students enrolled. This notion of context can also be extended to the operating environment of the students. This particularly applies where the operating systems and versions of applications that these online students have at their disposal may be different from each other and from the resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse how VMware ACE (Assured Computing Environment) was used to create DVD-based virtual machines for the delivery of both an operating systems and a multimedia applications course from the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT), and in particular how this is able to deal with issues surrounding different versions of operating systems and applications, as well as some software licensing issues. The conclusions of the paper highlight the advantages of using products such as VMware ACE and some of the potential pitfalls that exist. The findings should be of interest to institutions who are contemplating the delivery of similar types of online courses where it is important that students have access to the same versions of operating systems and applications.

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  • Virtual machine technologies and their application in the delivery of ICT

    McEwan, W. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Virtual Machine (VM) technology was first implemented and developed by IBM corporation in the early 1960's as a mechanism for providing multi-user facilities in a secure mainframe computing environment. In recent years the power of personal computers has resulted in renewed interest in the technology. This paper begins by describing the development of VM. It discusses the different approaches by which a VM can be implemented, and it briefly considers the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. VM technology has proven to be extremely useful in facilitating the teaching of multiple operating systems. It offers an alternative to the traditional approaches of using complex combinations of specially prepared and configured OS images installed via the network or installed permanently on multiple partitions or on multiple physical hard drives. VM technology has proven equally useful in the practical teaching of data communications, where complex internets have to be regularly constructed and reconfigured in order to study the underlying communication protocols (e.g. TCP/IP). It is also of immense use as a platform for research into these somewhat related areas - a virtual machine or network of virtual machines can be specially configured, allowing an ordinary user supervisor rights, and it can be tested to destruction without any adverse effect on the underlying host system. This paper hopes to also illustrate how VM configurations can greatly reduce our dependency on special purpose, complex, and expensive laboratory setups. It also suggests the important additional role that VM and VNL is likely to play in offering hands-on practical experience to students in a distance elearning environment.

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  • Patterns: lust for glory

    Wieck, M. (2001)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Pattern frameworks have emerged as a powerful if not yet pervasive tool for the continuous improvement of software authorship, teaching, business administration and building design. The concept of somehow storing proven solutions to repeating problems in a readily-retrievable form has enormous appeal to professionals in all walks of life. While there have emerged some excellent templates for the creation of effective patterns there are a number of alternatives that each offer something to attract different pattern users. This paper reviews those observed so far, considers their features and attempts to recommend a preferred version or versions in the light of developed criteria.

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  • Workplace assessment: balancing the needs of student and organisation

    Wieck, M (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper compares the needs of the student and employer as they undertook a cooperative education project, completed during the last six months of a fulltime, three-year degree in business computing. Some apparent conflicts of interest were examined and ways to resolve these conflicts were explored using Alexander’s patterns framework. The study derives from experiences with the first two cohorts of the Bachelor of Business Computing (BBComp) at Christchurch Polytechnic, where students apply the knowledge and skills gained on the course to real challenges and opportunities presented to them by companies in a business computing environment. The respective outcomes are negotiated between student and employer before the project begins. The student must in addition meet the academic requirements of the Polytechnic; they submit a number of assessments both during and after the project’s completion. The employer’s focus is on producing a commercial product subject to typical constraints such as budget, quality and time. Conflict may arise when - despite the agreed outcomes - the exigencies of the commercial environment force changes upon the student, deflecting them from their original intent. The author has responsibility for the coordination of the student project and acts as arbiter for both parties.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • Techlabs virtually four years on

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Techlabs is a network the authors implemented some years ago in order to provide a rich learning environment through the use of virtualisation. They outlined the background to and reasons for employing virtualisation in a paper to the conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2004. In this paper they now describe some of the changes they have introduced during the past four years, in the context of recent developments and the widespread adoption, both in industry and the academic sector, of virtualisation of one form or another.

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  • Use of Public Accountability Index (PAI) to assess the accountability practices of New Zealand Universities

    Ahmed, Z; Guo, C; Kabir, H; Narayan, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study explores the trends in public accountability of New Zealand universities. It applies the Public Accountability Index (PAI) developed by Coy and Dixon (2004) to eight New Zealand universities’ annual reports from years 2000 to 2012 to assess the development of public accountability in this public sector. Coy and Dixon (2004) applied the PAI to New Zealand universities for the period 1985-2000. This study extends their study to explore the changes of accountability practices in New Zealand universities over the last 12 years. It finds that the information disclosed in annual reports of universities has changed over the years in terms of format, content, and length. However, the overall public accountability disclosures have not significantly changed for the period 2000 to 2012 compared to the previous study of 1985-2000. The study concludes that the changes of accountability practices is somewhat motivated by the legislative changes.

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  • Embracing the Tall Poppy: Overcoming Tradition in Customer Jewellery Design Preference

    Kennedy, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This case study examines the role that Tall Poppy Syndrome (TPS) plays within the New Zealand jewellery industry. One company's attempt to subvert tradition and encourage personalization of milestone jewellery such as engagement rings and wedding rings has led to insights about Kiwi jewellery purchasing behaviours. The mass-market jewellery industry in New Zealand is heavily invested in producing jewellery designs that have existed for upwards of 50 years. Kiwi customers are on average less adventuresome in their preference for jewellery styles, and often purchase traditional jewellery designs because they believe such designs to be stylistically safer. This paper provides a detailed case study that examines how the Auckland-based boutique jeweller K. Amani Fine Jeweller designs against convention and consistently encourages tradition-minded customers to embrace personalized jewellery styles. This is accomplished through communicating to customers the personal design aesthetic of K. Amani’s jeweller, as well as through non-standard solutions to traditional jewellery manufacturing such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), 3D rendering, and 3D printing. Likewise, dedicated face-to-face consultations and a keen understanding of customer personality types help to raise awareness of jewellery design possibilities, and provide customers with a greater sense of security in order to opt for custom or non-traditional designs. This approach consistently results in customers electing personalized touches to their jewellery designs, and encourages lifetime loyalty to K. Amani who can create custom designs, versus jewellers that only provide stock items.

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