6,239 results for Conference item

  • Workplace assessment: balancing the needs of student and organisation

    Wieck, M (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper compares the needs of the student and employer as they undertook a cooperative education project, completed during the last six months of a fulltime, three-year degree in business computing. Some apparent conflicts of interest were examined and ways to resolve these conflicts were explored using Alexander’s patterns framework. The study derives from experiences with the first two cohorts of the Bachelor of Business Computing (BBComp) at Christchurch Polytechnic, where students apply the knowledge and skills gained on the course to real challenges and opportunities presented to them by companies in a business computing environment. The respective outcomes are negotiated between student and employer before the project begins. The student must in addition meet the academic requirements of the Polytechnic; they submit a number of assessments both during and after the project’s completion. The employer’s focus is on producing a commercial product subject to typical constraints such as budget, quality and time. Conflict may arise when - despite the agreed outcomes - the exigencies of the commercial environment force changes upon the student, deflecting them from their original intent. The author has responsibility for the coordination of the student project and acts as arbiter for both parties.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • Techlabs virtually four years on

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Techlabs is a network the authors implemented some years ago in order to provide a rich learning environment through the use of virtualisation. They outlined the background to and reasons for employing virtualisation in a paper to the conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2004. In this paper they now describe some of the changes they have introduced during the past four years, in the context of recent developments and the widespread adoption, both in industry and the academic sector, of virtualisation of one form or another.

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  • Use of Public Accountability Index (PAI) to assess the accountability practices of New Zealand Universities

    Ahmed, Z; Guo, C; Kabir, H; Narayan, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study explores the trends in public accountability of New Zealand universities. It applies the Public Accountability Index (PAI) developed by Coy and Dixon (2004) to eight New Zealand universities’ annual reports from years 2000 to 2012 to assess the development of public accountability in this public sector. Coy and Dixon (2004) applied the PAI to New Zealand universities for the period 1985-2000. This study extends their study to explore the changes of accountability practices in New Zealand universities over the last 12 years. It finds that the information disclosed in annual reports of universities has changed over the years in terms of format, content, and length. However, the overall public accountability disclosures have not significantly changed for the period 2000 to 2012 compared to the previous study of 1985-2000. The study concludes that the changes of accountability practices is somewhat motivated by the legislative changes.

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  • Identity and Stressful Organizational Change: A Qualitative Study

    Smollan, R; Pio, E

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Individual identity is constructed through many experiences, including the processes and outcomes of organizational change. Change is often stressful and can force individuals to rethink how they view themselves in organizational contexts. Our interviews in a healthcare organization highlight how individuals’ work-related identities and their coping strategies are impacted during and after stressful organizational change. We contribute to theory by presenting a more fine-grained understanding of the importance of identity and coping strategies in experiencing stressful organizational change and by developing a model that emerged from our analysis of the interview data.

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  • Embracing the Tall Poppy: Overcoming Tradition in Customer Jewellery Design Preference

    Kennedy, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This case study examines the role that Tall Poppy Syndrome (TPS) plays within the New Zealand jewellery industry. One company's attempt to subvert tradition and encourage personalization of milestone jewellery such as engagement rings and wedding rings has led to insights about Kiwi jewellery purchasing behaviours. The mass-market jewellery industry in New Zealand is heavily invested in producing jewellery designs that have existed for upwards of 50 years. Kiwi customers are on average less adventuresome in their preference for jewellery styles, and often purchase traditional jewellery designs because they believe such designs to be stylistically safer. This paper provides a detailed case study that examines how the Auckland-based boutique jeweller K. Amani Fine Jeweller designs against convention and consistently encourages tradition-minded customers to embrace personalized jewellery styles. This is accomplished through communicating to customers the personal design aesthetic of K. Amani’s jeweller, as well as through non-standard solutions to traditional jewellery manufacturing such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), 3D rendering, and 3D printing. Likewise, dedicated face-to-face consultations and a keen understanding of customer personality types help to raise awareness of jewellery design possibilities, and provide customers with a greater sense of security in order to opt for custom or non-traditional designs. This approach consistently results in customers electing personalized touches to their jewellery designs, and encourages lifetime loyalty to K. Amani who can create custom designs, versus jewellers that only provide stock items.

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  • Using genetic algorithms to solve layout optimisation problems in residential building construction

    Connor, AM; Siringoringo, WS

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper outlines an approach for the automatic design of material layouts for the residential building construction industry. The goal is to cover a flat surface using the minimum number of rectangular stock panels by nesting the off cut shapes in an efficient manner. This problem has been classified as the Minimum Cost Polygon Overlay problem. Results are presented for a typical problem and two algorithms are compared.

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  • Characterising relational view updates using relative information capacity

    Stanger, Nigel (2017-01)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This item includes a version that corrects to some minor errata that appeared in the published version.

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  • A Languages Strategy for Auckland: Why and What Are The Issues?

    Harvey, S; Warren, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Language Policy and Planning

    Harvey, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • A Novel Method for Decentralised Peer-to-peer Software License Validation Using Cryptocurrency Blockchain Technology

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Protecting software copyright has been an issue since the late 1970’s, and software license validation has been a primary method employed in an attempt to minimise software piracy and protect software copyright. This paper presents a novel method for decentralised peer-to-peer software license validation using cryptocurrency blockchain technology to ameliorate software piracy, and to provide a mechanism for all software developers to protect their copyrighted works.

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  • A Distributed Machine Learning Approach for the Secondary Voltage Control of an Islanded Micro-Grid

    Al Karim, M; Currie, J; Lie, T

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Balancing the active and the reactive power in a stand-alone micro-grid is a critical task. A micro-grid without energy storage capability is even more vulnerable to stability issues. This paper investigates a distributed secondary control to maintain the rated voltage in a stand-alone micro-grid. Here multiple machine learning algorithms have been implemented to provide the secondary control where a primary control scheme is insufficient to maintain a stable voltage after a sudden change in the load. The performance of the secondary control is monitored by a centralized system and in most of the cases it does not interfere. Based on different contingencies the proposed method would suggest different machine learning algorithms which are previously trained with similar data. The contingencies are based on an imbalance either in the active or in the reactive power in the system. It is considered that the distributed generators such as the wind and solar plants as well as the residential loads have some degree of randomness. The secondary control is invoked only in the events when primary droop control is insufficient to address the stability issue and maintain a desired voltage in the system.

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  • LED Lighting as Energy Management Tool through Correlation Analysis of Daily Electricity Demand and Supply Curve

    Qureshi, JA; Lie, T; Hasan, R

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Power industry has restructured in last decades and now it has become a commodity rather than a utility with the maximization of profit as its main purpose. Peak ripples in the electricity demand curve could disturb the economic generation. In developing countries, Electric Supply Companies are unable to meet the existing power demand due to unfeasible and unjustified fuel burning. Therefore, they are left with load shedding as the only Demand side solution. It is a well-known fact that the Light Emitting Diodes (LED) Lighting could be used to conserve electricity. However, LED could also be used as an energy management technique without affecting the comfort level of consumer. Electricity demand and supply curves could be correlated up to 93% through this option. Argument is supported by correlation analysis of estimated daily demand and supply curves of Karachi Electric Supply Company (KESC). Estimated curves are developed through LED lighting energy conservation analysis on KESC summer and winter demand curves. Finally, from global perspective, LED lighting is not only a remedy for removal of peaks and ripples in demand curve but also a feasible solution for global climate problems through energy conservation and low carbon emissions.

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  • Power Shift, Strategic Changes and Board Roles in SMEs: A Portfolio Approach

    Ingley, C; Khlif, W

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper aims to better understand board task performance according to firms' and their boards' need to change and adapt with the firms' changing strategic circumstances. Results from case studies of six Tunisian SMEs revealed a range of board functions grouped according to four typical board governance roles of control, strategy, service and mediation. The types of board involvement in firm decision making ranged from a passive board classified as a "legal fiction" to a fully active "pilot" board type depending on the relationship between the board and the CEO/founder and the firm's circumstances. SME governance under was found to encompass simultaneously all four board roles (which we term a "portfolio" of board roles) but emphasis was placed by boards on one or two key roles according to the changing strategic demands of the firm. This finding gives initial support to the board role portfolio concept as justification for boards in SMEs. It also has practical implications for how boards can best add strategic value to their firms when transitioning through challenges of transformational change in their development over time.

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  • Substitution In a Hybrid Remanufacturing System

    Marshall, S; Archibald, Thomas

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Increasing legislative and societal pressures are requiring manufacturers to operate more sustainably and to take responsibility for the fate of their goods after they have been used by consumers. This paper models a hybrid system in which new goods are produced and used goods are remanufactured. Newly produced goods and remanufactured goods are sold on separate markets, but can also act substitutes for each other. A semi-Markov Decision Process formulation of this problem is presented and is used to obtain an optimal policy, which specifies production, recovery and substitution decisions. The model is used explore the properties of this hybrid remanufacturing system, and in particular, the managerial implications associated with upward and downward substitution strategies are investigated.

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  • The Challeges in Implementing Security in Spontaneous Ad Hoc Networks

    Nisbet, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETS) promise much in the ability to rapidly deploy a wireless network in a fashion where no prior planning is needed and the network can be running efficiently and with high security within minutes. Natural disaster response, military, education and business provide areas where MANETS can offer significant advantages in communication where infrastructure networks may take days to set up or may be impossible to implement. This research reviews a selection of MANET protocols to show the progression of the research and the issues that are yet to be addressed. It discusses the challenges to researchers in improving ad hoc schemes to the point where they work in theory and in practice. Areas are highlighted that pose the most significant challenges to developing new security protocols and some food-for-thought is given for those who wish to contribute to this growing area of importance for wireless communication.

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  • Potential Barriers Students Face When Completing a Tertiary Qualification: The Lived Experiences of a Particular Minority Community Studying at a Western University

    Ali, I; Narayan, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Globally, there is growing focus by governments and tertiary education institutions to increase the participation, retention and success rates of students from disadvantaged communities. Concerted efforts are being made to ensure the disadvantaged students gain tertiary qualifications and join various professions where they are under-represented. However, despite various government and university initiatives, students from disadvantaged communities are still facing numerous barriers that is impacting on their participation and completion of a university qualification. This study investigates potential learning barriers through the lived experiences of students from a particular minority group. The objective of the study is to propose strategies that will enhance students’ success and completion rates of university qualifications. The study recognises that student perceptions through their lived experiences are beneficial to educators. Hence, data was collected via a survey questionnaire and focus group meetings. This research has the potential to make a significant contribution to the design and implementation of actionable strategies to help achieve better outcomes for the minority grouping of students struggling to complete a university qualification. It is anticipated that this research will help implement teaching and learning strategies that positively impacts students’ participation and completion of a university qualification. This will in turn help inform government tertiary education policy for the benefit of the wider community.

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  • Increasing Pass Rates in Introductory Mechanics Courses

    Jowitt, WA

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    BACKGROUND Low pass rates in introductory mechanics courses are commonly observed in universities throughout Australasia and elsewhere. In the author’s experience pass rates rise when the number of assignments rises. Unfortunately, with increasing class size, more assignments cause marking loads to become unmanageable. PURPOSE A teaching methodology that would encourage students to accept responsibility for, and to become involved in their studies was sought. The goal was to develop a system that would stimulate students to experience deep learning and to do more work, at the same time as reducing assessment load. APPROACH A system was developed that required all students to author questions and provide worked solutions, to be submitted in hard copy, the do-it-yourself (DIY) assignment. The lecturer chose one submission and wrote solutions that showed four lines of working for each line that was required for that solution. Only one of the given lines was correct, with subtle errors in the remaining three lines. The chosen problem and solution with four options for each line of working was posted online in multiple choice question (MCQ) format. For students to answer the MCQs they would have to carefully consider each line of working in order to decide on which answer to choose, thereby experiencing deeper learning than would take place in attempting simpler MCQ assessments. With automated marking available for MCQ assignments it was possible for the lecturer to set any number of assignments with no increase (in fact a substantial decrease) in marking load. The concepts of student-authored problems and online assessment are not new. What is believed to be unique in this paper is the provision of optional lines of working for students to analyse in deciding upon their answers. OUTCOMES In a strength of materials course, the above methodology was employed for problems in Macaulay’s method. The balance of the course did not employ the methodology. In the final exam, the average mark for the Macaulay’s method question was 65%, while the average mark for the remaining questions was 55% or lower. Students were surveyed to determine their experience of the DIY methodology. The overwhelming indications were that students felt they learned more from the DIY assignment than from other types, became engaged in the work, and appreciated instant availability of marks upon submission. CONCLUSIONS Observations made to date indicate that the DIY assignment has potential to improve student learning and exam pass rates. Acknowledging that there is risk in making abrupt changes in teaching and assessment methods, it is proposed to structure courses so that DIY assignments comprise (say) 20% of the total assessment, then to increase that percentage as the methodology is seen to produce higher marks in formal assessments.

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  • Mining Social Networking Sites for Digital Evidence

    Cusack, B; Alshaifi, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    OnLine Social Networking sites (SNS) hold a vast amount of information that individuals and organisations post about themselves. Investigations include SNS as sources of evidence and the challenge is to have effective tools to extract the evidence. In this exploratory research we apply the latest version of a proprietary tool to identify potential evidence from five SNS using three different browsers. We found that each web browser influenced the scope of the evidence extracted. In previous research we have shown that different open source and proprietary tools influence the scope of evidence obtained. In this research we asked, What variation in the scope of evidence extraction can be expected between different browsers? The implications of this exploratory research is for precaution. The choice of a web browser used to investigate a SNS directly influences the scope of digital evidence obtained.

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  • The preservation of Māori textiles: Collaboration, research and cultural meaning.

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Te Kanawa, Kahutoi; White, Moira (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Māori artefacts discovered in 1895 at Puketoi Station, Otago, South Island New Zealand, were re-examined using multiple methods to gather information of relevance and meaning to contemporary Māori culture. This paper discusses aspects of an interdisciplinary project including conservation treatment, plant material identification and examination of textile structure and details of cultural information thus uncovered. One artefact, the pukoro kete, or tutu-berry bag, is used as a case study to illustrate how knowledge uncovered about past material culture in collaboration with traditional owners can influence contemporary cultural practice and aid in affirmation of distinctive cultural identity.

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