46 results for Conference paper, 2000, ScholarlyCommons@AUT

  • Valuing computer science education research?

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:25Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper critically enquires into the value systems which rule the activities of teaching and research. This critique is intended to demonstrate the application of critical enquiry in Computer Science Education Research and therefore uses critical theory as a method of analysis.A framework of Research as a Discourse is applied to explore how the notions of research as opposed to teaching are presented, and how discipline and research communities are sustained. The concept of a discourse, based upon the work of Foucault, enables critical insight into the processes which regulate forms of thought. This paper positions the field of Computer Science Education Research, as an illustrative case, within the broader discourse of Research, and argues that Computer Science Education Researchers and educators need to understand and engage in this discourse and shape it to their own ends.

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  • International collaborative learning - the facilitation process

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:26Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    International collaborative learning is becoming more viable through a variety of Internet enabled software products. Group Support Systems appear to offer promise. But it is not well understood how to facilitate the teaching and learning process in electronic environments. If education is to involve an interactive process of collaborative inquiry and dialogue between remote groups of learners, then designing meaningful learning experiences presents challenges in logistics, technology support, software design, and pedagogy. To better model the facilitation process in such environments, a theoretical framework based on an extension of Adaptive Structuration Theory is suggested. This framework is then related to experiences with custom application software development using Lotus Notes Domino(TM), internal trials and a limited scale collaborative learning exercise between students at Auckland Institute of Technology and Uppsala University. The paper concludes by providing some recommendations for the redesign of the application, suggesting revisions to the collaborative process based on the framework presented, and discussing further extensions to the trials.

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  • Using Groupware for international collaborative learning

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:26Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The paper reports the lessons learned from a two year collaborative learning trial between students at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and Uppsala University. The trials took place using a combination of email and a custom developed Lotus NotesTM database. The first trial involved a case study in which students performed different roles in designing a software solution for an Auckland based nailcare distributor. The second trial built upon the knowledge base of the earlier trial, and required students to evaluate and rank the previous design proposals. A theoretical model developed from the group support systems literature guided some of the changes in the second trial. The software, the collaboration process and the evaluation methods evolved over the course of these trials. The challenges of creating global student communities within a short collaboration window in existing courses of study are discussed. Further extensions to this research are proposed and some general recommendations are made

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  • A cyber-icebreaker for an effective virtual group?

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:27Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports selected results from the most recent of a series of international collaborative trials between students at Auckland University of Technology and Uppsala University. The trials require students to work together in virtual groups, comprising students from each institution, to perform a common task. The topic of this paper is how to form and sustain more effective virtual groups. In this trial a cyber-icebreaker task has been introduced and its contribution to group effectiveness is explored. Some conclusions are drawn pinpointing the strengths and weaknesses of this trial design, and some insights into effective design of electronic collaborative learning groups are gained.

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  • 2D & 3D introductory processes in virtual groups

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:27Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports on a collaborative learning trial conducted in 2002 between students at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand and Uppsala University, Sweden. The trial design included an initial phase in which virtual groups became acquainted using different modes of cyber-icebreaker and a subsequent phase with a common task involving group decision making - evaluating and ranking the different icebreaker experiences. The software used in the trial comprised 1) a custom-developed web-based groupware database and 2) a Java 3D application, implying configurable avatars, which could be manipulated in a virtual world. Each of these applications supported icebreaking activities intended to establish trust between virtual group members, the latter in 3D mode and the former in 2D mode. The trial process and the software are initially outlined. The evaluation strategy and approaches to data analysis are then discussed and the paper concludes with a report of preliminary findings from the trial.

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  • Using IT for active student feedback in the learning environment

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:28Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the use of a web-based groupware product (specifically a Lotus NotesTM & DominoTM discussion database), as a means of gaining direct and regular feedback from students on the progress of a course. Some of the pitfalls and issues are discussed, including motivation for use, barriers to effective feedback, the value of anonymity and appropriate netiquette. Some recommendations are made for others wishing to use such a feedback mechanism, and for those who do not have Lotus Notes installed, how a feedback system such as this might be implemented in some other web based product.

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  • Genre structuring in a web-based groupware medium: the evolution of a project progress report

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:29Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Information Technology supported teaching and learning typically borrows many teaching practices and instruments from previous contexts. These typical practices or instruments can be classified into recognizable types or "genres". There are different ways in which these genres cross the boundaries of action, voice or paper based techniques to their electronically provided alternates. This study applies the framework of "genre structuring" to explore the evolution of a project progressreporting mechanism, re-implemented in a web-based groupware application, and used in several different Information Technology courses over the last three years.

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  • Knowledge skills and abilities demanded of graduates in the new learning environment

    Young, A.; Senadheera, L.; Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:29Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Changes in technology and employer demands require that we regularly survey our stakeholder communities to ensure the relevance and currency of what we are teaching, and the qualifications we offer to prepare our students for practice. At a presentation to an IT breakfast of the NZCS Auckland Branch in October 1998, the audience were surveyed in order to gauge how well we were doing in developing tomorrow's practitioners. Topics surveyed were: the relative importance of different technical skills required by employers, the key trends that we need to prepare graduates for, the impact of the Internet on skills required, the most urgent up skilling requirements of employees and the relative value of vendor vs. formal Polytechnic qualifications. The results of the survey are reported, the key findings analysed and some strategies are suggested which address the identified gaps.

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  • Dimensions of distance learning for computer education

    Clear, Tony; Meyer, J.; varden, S.; Rugeli, J. (2009-05-27T22:14:29Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we explore what is variously termed distance learning (DL), asynchronous, online, Web-based, and Web-supported learning in terms of how it can support and perhaps even improve the fields of education involving computing. We use the term distributed education to cover all mentioned topics. We describe how the incorporation of these methods can benefit computer education. These benefits arise because of the nature of the computing field, the profound requirements for students to understand concepts and acquire skills as opposed to mere exposure to facts, and our assessment that distributed education has the potential to address many of the challenges identified. We conclude with suggestions on the incorporation of distributed methods into computer education.

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  • Developing novice researchers understandings of research

    Clear, Tony; Young, A. (2009-05-27T22:14:32Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports progress from an action research programme to develop an active research community amongst New Zealand computing educators. Since 1998 the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) has sponsored a number of "Getting Started in Research Workshops". Topics addressed in the workshops have included definitions of research, the maturity profiles of researchers and the nature of research conducted under different research paradigms. The workshops have developed from an initial educative and developmental focus for novice researchers, to one that now embodies more of a critical perspective, in which participants reflect upon and collectively discuss their own beliefs and understandings as educators and researchers within the NACCQ sector. This has required the development of specific self-assessment instruments. These include an instrument for assessing researcher maturity and a further instrument for self-assessment of paradigm preferences in curriculum development and research. Preliminary results from these self-assessments have been reported (Clear & Young, 2001) which give some insights into the understandings about research of computing educators and novice researchers in the sector. But developing and refining these self-assessment instruments is a continuing process. Since this self-assessment process has been undertaken as a means of actively modelling use of the critical method in research, determining forms of analysis that are consonant with this paradigm is a current issue for the authors. This paper will discuss the context, the instruments developed, review the issues related to analysis of data gathered to date, and indicate future directions for this research.

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  • Reflective practice and action research as a source of pre-service and in-service professional development and classroom innovation: burden or benefit? myth or reality?

    Denny, HG (2009-05-27T22:15:19Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The concept of the teacher as reflective practitioner and teacher as researcher of his/her own classroom practice now has a long 20th and 21st century tradition and is promoted widely in the teacher education literature of recent years. But does it have real benefits for teacher skill development and innovation in classroom practice? This paper describes the outcomes of two research projects. The first examines the effectiveness of a reflective practice exercise carried out by both pre-service and inservice English teachers at AUT. The other follows the development of a collaborative action research project in which teachers reflected on and took steps to improve the teaching of casual conversation in their own classrooms. The paper will draw conclusions about the benefits and constraints for teachers of both reflective practice and the more formal action research, examining to what extent they help teachers to develop skills and encourage innovation in the classroom. Recommendations are made for future practice to support both reflective practice and its formalisation as action research.

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  • Improving the teaching of casual conversation through collaborative action research - a 'Leap in the Dark' or a 'Shot in the Arm'?

    Denny, HG; Roskvist, A.; Englefield, B. (2009-05-27T22:17:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    There is, in recent TESOL literature, much encouragement for teachers to undertake Action Learning and Action Research in order to improve teaching and develop research skills. But how practical and beneficial is this in a New Zealand tertiary setting where teachers of EAL have high teaching and administrative workloads and large classes? This paper describes the process of setting up a collaborative action research/learning project in which a group of teachers of adult EAL migrants focused on investigating the teaching of casual conversation in English. It surveys the literature that informed the research both on teacher research and the teaching of casual conversation in English and examines the benefits for teaching and for research skill development, the challenges, and the constraints of such an undertaking. Two members of the group outline briefly their action research into the teaching of aspects of casual conversation and describe specific strategies that helped learners in their own classroom contexts.

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  • An incremental principal component analysis for chunk data

    Ozawa, S.; Pang, S.; Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:48Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents a new algorithm of dynamic feature selection by extending the algorithm of Incremental Principal Component Analysis (IPCA), which has been originally proposed by Hall and Martin. In the proposed IPCA, a chunk of training samples can be processed at a time to update the eigenspace of a classification model without keeping all the training samples given so far. Under the assumption that L of training samples are given in a chunk, first we derive a new eigenproblem whose solution gives us a rotation matrix of eigen-axes, then we introduce a new algorithm of augmenting eigen-axes based on the accumulation ratio. We also derive the one-pass incremental update formula for the accumulation ratio. The experiments are carried out to verify if the proposed IPCA works well. Our experimental results demonstrate that it works well independent of the size of data chunk, and that the eigenvectors for major components are obtained without serious approximation errors at the final learning stage. In addition, it is shown that the proposed IPCA can maintain the designated accumulation ratio by augmenting new eigen-axes properly. This property enables a learning system to construct an informative eigenspace with minimum dimensionality. © 2006 IEEE.

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  • Evolutionary Computation for Dynamic Parameter Optimisation of Evolving Connectionist Systems for On-line Prediction of Time Series with Changing Dynamics

    Kasabov, N; Song, Q.; Nishikawa, I. (2009-05-27T22:18:48Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The paper describes a method of using evolutionary computation technique for parameter optimisation of evolving connectionist systems (ECOS) that operate in an online, life-long learning mode. ECOS evolve their structure and functionality from an incoming stream of data in either a supervised-, or/and in an unsupervised mode. The algorithm is illustrated on a case study of predicting a chaotic time-series that changes its dynamics over time. With the on-line parameter optimisation of ECOS, a faster adaptation and a better prediction is achieved. The method is practically applicable for real time applications.

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  • WDN-RBF: weighted data normalization for radial basic function type neural networks

    Song, Q.; Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:49Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper introduces an approach of Weighted Data Normalization (WDN) for Radial Basis Function (RBF) type of neural networks. It presents also applications for medical decision support systems. The WDN method optimizes the data normalization ranges for the input variables of the neural network. A steepest descent algorithm (BP) is used for the WDN-RBF learning. The derived weights have the meaning of feature importance and can be used to select a minimum set of variables (features) that can optimize the performance of the RBF network model. The WDN-RBF is illustrated on two case study prediction/identification problems. The first one is prediction of the Mackey-Glass time series and the second one is a real medical decision support problem of estimating the level of renal functions in patients. The method can be applied to other distance-based, prototype learning neural network models.

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  • Computational neurogenetic modeling: a methodology to study gene interactions underlying neural oscillations

    Benuskova, L.; Wysoski, S.; Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:49Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    We present new results from Computational Neurogenetic Modeling to aid discoveries of complex gene interactions underlying oscillations in neural systems. Interactions of genes in neurons affect the dynamics of the whole neural network model through neuronal parameters, which change their values as a function of gene expression. Through optimization of the gene interaction network, initial gene/protein expression values and neuronal parameters, particular target states of the neural network operation can be achieved, and statistics about gene interaction matrix can be extracted. In such a way it is possible to model the role of genes and their interactions in different brain states and conditions. Experiments with human EEG data are presented as an illustration of this methodology and also, as a source for the discovery of unknown interactions between genes in relation to their impact on brain activity. © 2006 IEEE.

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  • Evolving connectionist systems based role allocation of robots for soccer playing

    Huang, L.; Song, Q.; Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:50Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    For a group of robots (multi-agents) to complete a task, it is important for each of them to play a certain role changing with the environment of the task. One typical example is robotic soccer in which a team of mobile robots perform soccer playing behaviors. Traditionally, a robot's role is determined by a closed-form function of a robot's postures relative to the target which usually cannot accurately describe real situations. In this paper, the robot role allocation problem is converted to the one of pattern classification. Evolving classification function (ECF), a special evolving connectionist systems (ECOS), is used to identify the suitable role of a robot from the data collected from the robot system in real time. The software and hardware platforms are established for data collection, learning and verification for this approach. The effectiveness of the approach are verified by the experimental studies. ©2005 IEEE.

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  • On-line evolving fuzzy clustering

    Ravi, V.; Srinivas, E.; Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:50Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, a novel on-line evolving fuzzy clustering method that extends the evolving clustering method (ECM) of Kasabov and Song (2002) is presented, called EFCM. Since it is an on-line algorithm, the fuzzy membership matrix of the data is updated whenever the existing cluster expands, or a new cluster is formed. EFCM does not need the numbers of the clusters to be pre-defined. The algorithm is tested on several benchmark data sets, such as Iris, Wine, Glass, E-Coli, Yeast and Italian Olive oils. EFCM results in the least objective function value compared to the ECM and Fuzzy C-Means. It is significantly faster (by several orders of magnitude) than any of the off-line batch-mode clustering algorithms. A methodology is also proposed for using theXie-Beni cluster validity measure to optimize the number of clusters. © 2007 IEEE.

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  • A two-stage methodology for gene regulatory network extraction from time-course gene expression data

    Chan, Z.; Kasabov, N; Collins, L. (2009-05-27T22:18:50Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The discovery of gene regulatory networks (GRN) from time-course gene expression data (gene trajectory data) is useful for (1) identifying important genes in relation to a disease or a biological function; (2) gaining an understanding on the dynamic interaction between genes; (3) predicting gene expression values at future time points and accordingly, (4) predicting drug effect over time. In this paper, we propose a two-stage methodology that is implemented in the software "Gene Network Explorer (GNetXP)" for extracting GRNs from gene trajectory data. In the first stage, we apply a hybrid Genetic Algorithm and Expectation Maximization algorithm on clustering the large number of gene trajectories using the mixture of multiple linear regression models for fitting the trajectory data. In the second stage, we apply the Kalman Filter to identify a set of first-order differential equations that describe the dynamics of the representative trajectories, and use these equations for discovering important gene interactions and predicting gene expression values at future time points. The proposed method is demonstrated on the human fibroblast response gene expression data. ©2004 IEEE.

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  • Discovering rules of adaptation and interaction: from molecules and gene interaction to brain functions

    Kasabov, N (2009-05-27T22:18:51Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

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