5 results for Conference paper, 2000, Share

  • Carnival and Construction – Towards a Scaffolding for the Inclusion of ICT in the Construction Process

    McMeel, Dermott (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. In this paper we explore the process of construction, we consider the construc- tion site as a mediated collaborative environment in which many specialist crafts and esoteric skills are present and negotiated. Concrete information when pass onto a construction site becomes part of a fluid morphing object, the validity and meaning of information can change—or be lost—depending on where and when it is. We look at current models of construction and actual construction process and we explore the notion of Carnival as a tool to reconcile the concrete and fluid aspects to communication dynamics of mediated group working in general and of construction site practice specifically.

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  • Intrepid traveller: the University of Auckland Library on the e-book journey

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    E-books continue to thrive with e-book technology companies developing a variety of solutions for libraries, many of which offer excellent support for teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to present the University of Auckland Library’s experiences in integrating e-books into the learning environment. This is a complex issue and will be considered from different perspectives: selection, purchasing, providing access, cataloguing, and user support and satisfaction.

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  • Dirty Work

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: Proc. W1 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference 6-10 September – Designer, User, Meaning Maker: Rethinking Relationships for a More Creative HCI. pp. 26-29. Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. This research explores the potency of dirt as a category for understanding digital communications. Our eventual target domain is communication in the construction industry, which is characterised by contractual formalities on the one hand (working documents, specifications, forms), and informal communications on the other (onsite instructions, scribbles on paper). Electronic communications (such as email and message boards) represent hybrid formal-informal media in the increasingly litigious workplace. On the way to understanding the untidiness of the construction site, we analysed the use of formal and informal communications in group working by students in the design and construction of an interactive digital art installation. Our research so far draws on the interesting relationship between dirt, authority, and human-computer interaction.

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  • Talking Dirty

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard; Lee, John (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    We analyse the emergence and use of formal and informal communication tools in group working to aid in understanding the complexity of construction projects. Our test case is the design and build of an interactive digital installation in an exhibition space, involving students. After the project we conducted focus group studies to elicit insights into the effective use of the digital communications available for the project. We recount key insights from the study and examine how digital messaging devices are contributing to or hindering creative discussion. Whereas the construction process is concerned with the removal of dirt and re-ordering, in this paper we reflect on construction’s ritualistic, contractual and unauthorized aspects, and dirt’s role within them. We draw on Bakhtin’s theories of the carnival in exploring ritual, and the mixing of the un-sanctioned (rumour) with the official (contractual). How does dirt impinge on issues of communication, open discussion, and the move towards “partnering” in construction practice? We conjecture that while physical dirt might be unpleasant, the removal of other forms of metaphorical dirt hampers construction as an efficient and creative process.

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  • E-books - essentials or extras? The University of Auckland Library experience

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2004)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    The e-publishing industry is developing rapidly, providing new opportunities for libraries, but creating new challenges as well. Questions on how best to integrate e-books into the learning environment are pressing. In 2003, the University of Auckland Library provided access to nearly 80,000 e-books through the library catalogue only. This paper will explore some of the theoretical and practical issues of implementing e-books in the University of Auckland Library, covering such issues as: - Integration - Workflow - Differences in perception/acceptance of digital texts - Response from students and staff - User preferences and reasons for these

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