107 results for Conference paper, 2000, 2006

  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

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  • Falling into trade:- apprentices' perceptions of becoming a baker

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is a report on the initial data analysis of a larger study on how apprentices become bakers. The overall objective of this study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This interim report is based on interviews with first year apprentices. The apprentices interviewed were all between 17 to 18 years of age. The majority of these apprentices left school in year 11 or 12 (equivalent to Australian years 10 and 11) with minimal National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) credits. Perhaps surprisingly, none of these apprentices had initial ambitions to become bakers. However, interestingly, they had all undertaken work experience in bakeries while at school. At the time of the interviews, they were well into their first year of working in a bakery. Therefore, this report provides a snapshot view of how these apprentices have settled into the baking life and their progress through the beginning stages of becoming bakers.

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  • The first time eLearner's journey: an examination of attrition and withdrawal issues in workplace-based eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the extent of the problem, or a clear understanding of what direct factors contribute to learners dropping out of eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. It also argues that undertaking an eLearning course for the first time can be experienced as daunting and overwhelming for the mature adult learner. The learner’s initial experience of confronting simultaneous, multiple learning tasks at the start of an eLearning course can contribute to an overloading of a learner’s cognitive processing ability and is one possible reason for the high levels of drop outs from an online course within the first few weeks of the course start. This paper draws on experience in the development and delivery of online management training courses to employees in the New Zealand public sector. The experience is used to develop a conceptual model of the learning journey experienced by a first-time eLearner at the start of an online course. Conclusions are drawn as to the likely factors leading to learner withdrawal, and the type, and timing of support to enhance learner retention, engagement and achievement.

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  • Reflections: Te Kura Unua 2006

    Reilly, Michael (2006)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Paper presented at Te Kura Unua. Te Kura Unua is an annual research exchange hui, which brings together staff and post-graduate students from Te Tumu and Te Kawa a Māui, School of Māori Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, in an effort to share the research interest of both schools and develop collaborative research relationships between the two schools. Te Kura Unua began in 2004 and is hosted alternately every year by each school.

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  • MAPPING PROCESSES TOWARD STRATEGIC LEVERAGE

    Chia Cua, Francisco; Theivananthampillai, Paul (2006)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Although corporate strategy helps in differentiation, positioning, and aligning the organisation to align itself internaly to be competitive, it is not enough. A separate enterprise information system (EIS) strategy must be put in place do deal with external realities. This is particularly crucial to a software start-up in its prototype development stage. Development time must be as short as possible. Two-way communications is possible through EIS. This paper examines a start-up, scans its business environments and explores opportunities, threats, and appropriate corporate strategy. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) and its evolution provides insights to understanding the concept of EIS strategy that folows

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  • Selection in space

    Star, B; Spencer, Hamish (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Only the abstract was published in the proceedings. There is no full text.

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  • Ethnohistoriography of Koh Samui: Change and adaptation in a tourism period

    Chatkaewnapanon, Yuthasak (2006-10-18)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This thesis is in the late stage of development, as it started in July 2004. It is an Ethnohistoriography of Koh Samui, which involved 12 months of fieldwork, February 2005- February 2006, on Koh Samui, Thailand. The main focus of this research is to produce a historiography of Koh Samui through a contextual analysis of discursive change on living process, change in economic organization and social institutions in a period of tourism development. In other words, it is about recognizing and perceiving tourism development as a cause of Koh Samui history. It is important to note that this research adopts a historical approach, whereby history as a discipline aims to reconstruct the uniqueness of the event rather than making a general law (Evans 2002; Jordanova 2000; Meyerhoff 1959; McCullagh 2004; Tower 1988). Therefore, in paraphrasing Towner’s words into this context, this study of the history of Koh Samui aims to understand the change of Koh Samui over tourism time. The case study ‘will contribute to a dynamic model or concept of the role of tourism in societies in general’ rather than ‘to develop a more general concept of society’ (Tower 1988: 51). The thesis sets out primarily to examine the experience of life on a small island in Thailand in coping with mass tourism development and the response to the rapid and overwhelming social changes exerted by such development. Moreover, the work intends to provide insight into the relationship between change and tourism development as seen by the locals themselves, a perspective which is often overlooked in studies of tourism development. However, although the results are specific, the research model, theoretical concern and methodology can be applied to researching those living with tourism elsewhere (Tucker 2003).

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  • The view from the Chathams: geovisualisation of web site hits using Google Earth™

    Stanger, Nigel (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    A useful approach to visualising the geographical distribution of web site hits is to geolocate the IP addresses of hits and plot them on a world map. In this paper we examine the efficacy of Google Earth for this purpose.

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  • A framework for a destination reputation management process: A case study of three destinations

    Ermen, David (2006-10-18)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The thesis to be discussed in this paper is at the middle to late stage of development. Since the 2005 Otago PhD Colloquium I have completed the first stage of data collection and am currently analysing the data from this exploratory stage. This paper introduces PhD research into communications management in tourism destinations, where it is proposed that in order to manage the reputation of the destinations as a whole, proactive communication and cooperation between stakeholders is necessary. An application of network (Hakansson and Snehota 1995) theory to destinations provides the basis for the discussion of how effective communication facilitates the strategic interaction between relevant industry players and their stakeholders in order to develop a sustainable competitive advantage for the destination. Theories of corporate communications management (Cornelissen 2004; Goodman 2000) and reputation management (Fombrun and Shanley 1990; Fombrun 1996; Fombrun and Van Riel 2004; Greyser 1999) are used as examples of these processes in large corporate organisations. The key argument is that just like large corporate structures, tourism destinations need to communicate effectively, internally and externally, They are socio-economic organizations and their profit objectives need to be well balanced with the social and environmental concerns of stakeholders in order for tourism to be a legitimate method of economic development in regions that are dependent on it (Flagestad and Hope 2001). Therefore, it is necessary to see beyond the business networks that operate at a destination level and open the analysis to the interaction amongst all stakeholders that form parts of the social context in which economic action is embedded. Three comparative cases, Wanaka in New Zealand, Åre in Sweden and St Moritz in Switzerland are examined in two research stages to construct a model of communication dynamics amongst stakeholders within tourism destinations. The thesis aims to provide both theoretical contributions to strategic network management as well as tourism destination management and practical guidance for practitioners who are managing in the context of destination networks. The paper presented here will briefly introduce the relevant literature and then move on to a more detailed discussion of research propositions and methodological issues, which are presently most relevant to the development of the thesis. No results will be presented in this paper, since the data analysis is still in progress, but first results will be available for presentation at the Colloquium. For this reason, the paper is intended to provide an overview of what has been done so far and how it was done, so that discussants will be able to understand the results when they are presented. These results will provide the basis for a more detailed second round of data collection.

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  • How does space alter the formulation of evolutionary models?

    Whigham, Peter A; Dick, Grant (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This short paper discusses how space is introduced within evolutionary models and reviews several approaches from the literature. In particular, the Moran process is used as one type of model that has been described in several ways when space is introduced. The evolutionary operations of parental selection, offspring placement, synchronous and asynchronous updating, survival and death timings are shown to be factors that may be interpreted in a number of ways once space is introduced into a model. One conclusion from this discussion is that the introduction of space requires a consideration of the time-step in models, directly through event driven processes or indirectly through the random selection of space prior to a local process.

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  • Pragmatic account of the process of knowledge creation in a Chinese context – How Socially-Produced Identity is transformed into economic production

    Sunaryo, Lenny (2006-10-18)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Knowledge is regarded as important for creating organisational value and enhancing organisational competitiveness, especially in an unpredictable environment (Nonaka, 1994). However, there is little understanding of how knowledge is created in organisations, nor of how the knowledge creation process can be managed (Tsoukas & Mylonopoulos, 2004). This study is grounded on the idea that understanding contexts is crucial in managing the knowledge creation process (Glisby & Holden, 2003). More specifically, it is based on the idea that it is important to understand how identity is formed in the Chinese context, and how this leads to social knowledge that supports coordination and communication, which facilitates subsequent transformation of identity into economic productivity that creates a firm’s superiority over competitors (Kogut & Zander, 1996). It examines the process of organisational knowledge creation from the perspective of Chinese entrepreneurs in Semarang, Indonesia, for these reasons: first, studies on Chinese businesses have been predominantly based on Western management concepts, and do not represent the real situations in the Chinese context (Tsui, 2006); second, most of the extant studies on organisational knowledge creation have been inspired by Nonaka & Takeuchi’s (1995) generic model of continuous knowledge conversion as the fundamental process for knowledge creation. Despite the popularity of Nonaka’s work, it is based on business practices in large Japanese firms, which limits its generalisability to other social contexts, including the Chinese one under examination here. Further, the study of Chinese entrepreneurs in Indonesia, particularly in Semarang (a close-knit Chinese society), is undeveloped despite their significant contribution to the national economy.

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  • A rule language for modelling and monitoring social expectations in multi-agent systems

    Cranefield, Stephen (2006)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The full text is available only from the related link (you must be a subscriber to the SpringerLink service).

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  • Evolutionary multiobjective optimisation through spatially-structured non-dominated sorting: a preliminary study

    Dick, Grant (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) are useful tools capable of searching problems that contain several conflicting criteria. Although MOEAs have been shown to be capable of finding a wide spread of Pareto-optimal solutions for a given problem, they are still hindered by the requirement for significant computation. This paper investigates a new MOEA that incorporates spatial structure into the population. The introduction of space into the algorithm alters the behaviour of the algorithm so that computational complexity increases linearly with population size. In addition, the paper suggests paths that could be taken to improve the algorithm’s ability to successfully converge upon the global Pareto-optimal front of a given problem.

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  • Short Messaging Services (SMS) and banking

    Tanakinjal, Geoffrey Harvey (2006-10-18)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    As a direct marketing tool, electronic Short Message Services (SMS) is likely to surpass internet-based advertising before the end of 2006. Younger consumers higher in social class are the most willing to accept SMS direct advertising text and respond favourably to SMS-TV integrated marketing communications (Trappey III & Woodside, 2005). On the same note, online banking is starting to gain its momentum via the internet. Nonetheless, effort has been made to ensure online banking flexibility walks hand in hand with the convenience factor, therefore introducing banking via mobile phone (with GPRS interface). Understanding how companies should interact with their customers and deliver services in electronic environments is of decisive importance (Parasuraman and Zinkhan 2002). Nevertheless, despite these advantages, the consumer uses mobile devices mainly for simple services, such as voice services and text messaging. Based on this factor, it is important to understand the driving forces of consumers’ intentions to use mobile services and to adapt the services to fulfil consumers’ motives for using them (Nysveen, Pedersen, & Thorbjornsen. 2005). Objective of the study The general purpose of this study is to explore Short Messaging Service (SMS) potential as a vehicle of banking services by understanding consumers’ attitude, motivation and behavior towards wireless application channel. Significance of the study The contributions of the study may include: a. For the service providers or network companies, the study will be able to contribute additional information regarding consumer preference toward SMS messages on mobile banking; and b. For the marketers, especially those involved in the banking industry, this research will help understand the approach of wireless application technology.

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  • Beginning research on the quantification of spatial order

    Martin, Peter (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This research was conceived to contribute to the theoretical foundations of a general view of the dynamics of the world based on a concept of spatial order, defined and quantified in terms of differences or gradients. The Second Law of thermodynamics, which in its original conception expressed the dynamic potential of differences (of temperature), is central to this study, because of its unique and controversial role in relating spatial order to temporal order, providing an apparent direction to time and to general evolution. It suggests the existence and import of widely-applicable principles of a broader “entropy dynamics”, in which the evolution of order, intentional or otherwise, depends recursively on the dissipation of order; moreover the Second Law itself is understood as a consequence of primordial spatial order—viz. vanishing Weyl tensor of space-time curvature (Penrose 1989). Hence the intention is to explore the foundations and implications of a proposed scientific “paradigm”, of attempted maximal logical economy, in which spatial order is seen as both cause and effect of what we observe. Change of perspective regarding individuals’ relation to their world is the principal aim of the study, to be motivated by elaboration of the applicability of the proposed paradigm to diverse fields and by exploration of computational models which, it is hoped, will reveal some of the unexpected dynamics of the evolution of order.

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  • A reconceptualisation of destination tourism management: focussing on sustainability and corporate social responsibility

    Mitchell, Robert (2006-10-18)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This research proposal is in an early stage of development. Investigating the linkages between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the business strategies of tourism destination businesses offers the prospect of new perspectives on the management of sustainable tourism. Previous tourism management discussion has been dominated by research into tourist perceptions and joint government and industry planning processes for addressing physical and social impacts of tourism. And although there has been some discussion of the ethical and CSR aspects of tourism there has been a notable lack of empirical research. Sustainable management of tourism operations seeks a balance of economic, social and environmental considerations. And even with widespread concern about social and environmental impacts, economic business drivers continue to dominate management thinking. The tensions caused by differing perceptions of sustainability and expectations of sustainable the industry stakeholders in the face of steady growth in tourist numbers, indicates the need for further research. The application of a CSR lens could provide useful insights in this domain. The conflicting perceptions of sustainability are held by business strategists, economists, planners and ecologists invite investigation. The conceptualisation of sustainable business embraces continuing and sustainable business performance, while the concept of sustainable development supports development which generates long term and equitable social and environmental and economic outcomes which outweigh any negative factors. Sustainable tourism is generally conceived as an industry objective rather that a strictly defined concept and it is seen to be broadly in accord with the concept of sustainable development. Tourism management literature indicates that effective resolution of the conflicting objectives of destination stakeholders requires constructive long term cooperation between tourism operators, government and local communities. Adding the requirement of sustainability to the formula produces a range of new demands. Although there has also been considerable research into the cooperation between tourism groups, government and communities, relatively few examine the challenge of balancing business management philosophies and practices with the objective of achieving sustainable tourism. A special problem in sustainable tourism is the challenge of long term management of visitor activity in protected natural areas (PNAs) or national parks. Hoped for outcomes from this research are: An extended understanding of how stakeholders cooperate, or fail to cooperate, in the management of common pool resources in the form of PNAs. An understanding of the ethical bases for management strategies could provide new insights in the sustainable management of tourism destinations.

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  • Red blood cell segmentation using guided contour tracing

    Vromen, Joost; McCane, Brendan (2006-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    We present a model-based contour tracing approach to the problem of automatically segmenting a Scanning Electron Microscope image of red blood cells. These images characteristically have high numbers of overlapping cells and relatively smooth contours. We provide a brief look into what problems conventional algorithms encounter when attempting to segment these images, and go on to show that a model-based contour tracing approach attains high levels of accuracy and almost no false negatives.

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  • Gimme shelter: Tsunami mitigation as part of a permanent shelter programme for Aceh, north Sumatra

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The resulting housing solutions developed for permanent shelter as part of aid packages and reconstruction often belie the complexity of their resolution. This paper briefly outlines the often hidden subtleties in such designs and in particular the complexity that “mitigation” can require. Mitigation is the accepted “notion” that any reconstruction should address former issues by reducing those perceived problems and issues. The hope is that they can be completed eliminated so that the disaster does not happen again. This may not always be achievable. The development of a permanent shelter reconstruction program for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for tsunami victims on the west Coast of Aceh, North Sumatra is documented. And in this program the obvious mitigation need was for “tsunami proofing” of housing. Drawing on the tsunami report by Wilkinson, the paper highlights the process, design and planning considered as part of this mitigation and the practicalities of “balancing” the wishes of people to return home to sites ravaged by the tsunami against the responsibility to ensure “safe” housing (Wilkinson, 2005). The starkness of the engineering “numbers” against the social costs is compelling and the paper highlights in practical terms the difficulties sometimes faced to reduce and thus “mitigate”.

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  • Measuring the qualitative aspects of a reconstruction programme: Aceh, Indonesia

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Aid Agencies are accountable for the funds that they administer and consequently there is a reporting requirement to demonstrate that any intervention (such as a permanent housing program) is beneficial to those that the Agency seeks to assist. The WHO Quality of Life Tool (WHO QLT) is one such measure of well being and has been extensively used since it was developed in 1996 (predominantly in the health sector). However, it does requires a before and after study to produce results. This is not necessarily problematic but the paper reports on the application of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Survey tool that consists of 42 questions (hence its name DASS42) as part of a shelter program for the West Coast of Aceh following the December 2004 tsunami. The advantage of the DASS42 is that it can quantify results based on one survey (Lovibond, 1995). The DASS42 was developed at the University of New South Wales, Australia and while it enjoys wide acceptance this was the first time it was applied to a shelter program. The results from the DASS42 can be used to prioritise beneficiaries and when combined with the Disaster Life Continuum Model (rather than a 4 R Model) provides insights into the psycho-social status of beneficiaries. The paper outlines how the DASS42 was used to quantify the impact of the tsunami disaster in terms of gender, age and resilience of the Acehnese people. The survey was completed by 600 respondents at 5 different locations along the West Coast during the first two weeks of March 2005, less than 3 months after the tsunami.

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  • Leadership learning: The praxis of dilemma management

    Cardno, Carol (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    No abstract available yet

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