671 results for Conference paper, 2000

  • Encouraging student retention: a study of student retention practices

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Tinto (2002) asks what would it mean for institutions to take student retention seriously? For CPIT, it took the harsh realities of budgeting EFTS for 2004. We had always seen it as an adult student problem – the students were adults: if they chose to leave it was their business. Now, at budget preparation time, when we saw the retention of our 2003 mid-year intake was 60%, we realised it wasn’t a student problem – it was our problem. We had found what it would mean to take student retention seriously.

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  • eLearning initiative for education in ICT

    McCarthy, C.; Ross, J. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    CPIT has recently started offering the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT) (Level 5) in a blended delivery format to a small group of students under the Ministry of Education’s Digital Opportunities (DigiOPs) Community Technicians Project. This paper documents, reflects on and reviews the initial set-up, preparation and start-up of delivering the DipICT (Level 5) to a group of students located in remote rural areas throughout New Zealand. The results of this initial review, along with the two further stages of evaluative research, will help towards supporting the growth of flexible delivery methods that include eLearning and allow us to ensure effectiveness of such blends for future projects or instances of delivery.

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

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  • eLearning deployment: knowing your context

    Martin, A.; Nesbit, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines concepts from the Knowledge Management (KM) domain and looks at how they can be applied in an eLearning setting. Particular attention is paid to the notion of context as it is defined in the KM body of literature and how it was applied in the development of eLearning content for courses from the Certificate in Computing (CIC).

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  • A virtual solution to a real problem: Vmware in the classroom

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years we have witnessed rapid advancements in ICT, which in turn has led, in the industry, to a staggering growth in the number and diversity of computer and networking solutions. As a result, academic institutions and professional training organizations face serious challenges in exposing students to many different computing environments while making efficient use of limited resources. To put it bluntly, how do we easily provide people with the practical experience of working with different operating systems, server applications, switches and routers? For a number of years, tutors at the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) have been using VMWare for the teaching of Microsoft, Linux, Netware and other operating systems as well as various associated technologies. The use of VMWare allows students to complete exercises, laboratory work and practical projects involving multiple servers in multiple networks without having to leave the physical confines of a single computer. While William McEwan (2002) documents the use of virtual machines, its origins and uses in the teaching of Unix and Linux courses, this paper extends this to other operating systems and moreover shifts the focus to the supporting infrastructure required in order to extract the maximum benefit from this virtualisation of machines, devices and storage media. This paper discusses one response to the dilemma of needing to expose students to a range of rapidly evolving computing technologies while ensuring that costs are kept low and that the supporting infrastructure is reliable, robust and not easily compromised in one way or another: in short, a solution that delivers to students and staff alike, a safe, scalable and flexible learning environment.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

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  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

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  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

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  • The first time eLearner's journey: an examination of attrition and withdrawal issues in workplace-based eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the extent of the problem, or a clear understanding of what direct factors contribute to learners dropping out of eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. It also argues that undertaking an eLearning course for the first time can be experienced as daunting and overwhelming for the mature adult learner. The learner’s initial experience of confronting simultaneous, multiple learning tasks at the start of an eLearning course can contribute to an overloading of a learner’s cognitive processing ability and is one possible reason for the high levels of drop outs from an online course within the first few weeks of the course start. This paper draws on experience in the development and delivery of online management training courses to employees in the New Zealand public sector. The experience is used to develop a conceptual model of the learning journey experienced by a first-time eLearner at the start of an online course. Conclusions are drawn as to the likely factors leading to learner withdrawal, and the type, and timing of support to enhance learner retention, engagement and achievement.

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  • The workplace eLearner: Designing and delivering eLearning into the workplace

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, polytechnics and institutes of technology in New Zealand have had an extensive relationship with industry, business and the public sector employers in terms of placing students into internships, work experience, clinical placements and such like. Polytechnics are also able to secure relevant industry representatives on polytechnic programme advisory boards, for providing guidance with curriculum design and industry guidelines for applied qualifications. However, providing training and education in the workplace represents a very different situation. While polytechnics are seen as good providers of entry level workers that industry, business and the public sector can mould to their own particular culture and needs, in terms of providing training and education in the workplace, polytechnics are seen by some as inflexible, too expensive, unresponsive and not really equipped to develop and deliver programmes that are tailored to the client’s specific needs. Web-based technology enabled learning offers the potential for the New Zealand’s polytechnic sector to address many of the problems they have faced in delivering cost effective training and education into the workplace. It also has the possibility to deal with the perceived weaknesses of traditional methods of workplace-based training and instruction. While computer-based training offers the advantages of self-paced learning and skills training, the real value in a workplace learning environment is the ability to capture and leverage the knowledge, expertise and skills already present in the learners. This paper presents a case study of how a consortium of polytechnics have undertaken two related eLearning projects which deliver a national management qualification to current and aspiring supervisory personnel in the New Zealand public sector.

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  • The X files - an XML Xperience

    Kennedy, D.; Lance, M. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML – eXtensible Markup Language. A way to markup a document for content. A standard for data interchange that is being used for B2B transactions. XML is designed for use with data-centric documents. Williams et al, 2000 describe a method for mapping a RDBMS structure to an XML DTD. A non-trivial realworld example was selected, that of course outlines. A RDBMS was designed for course outlines and the structure mapped to a DTD. The DTD plus a sample document was initially validated using Internet Explorer. It was further checked using an on-line validator. The DTD was subsequently revised in line with guidelines for good XML.

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  • Analysis of results in simulation and modeling of CDMA systems

    Kolahi, Samad (2007-07-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, using discrete event stochastic simulation by batch-means, new results have been obtained by analysing the sensitivity of CDMA blocking probability for a given traffic load against various number of calls per batch and confidence intervals. It is found that for the system under study one long simulation with one million call arrivals produce approximately 99% confidence in results while it needs 100,000 calls to achieve 95% confidence. For system under study and with 27 Erlang of traffic, the blocking probability is 0.0202 with 99% confidence and 0.0192 with 95% confidence. The impact of warm-up period on CDMA simulation is discussed. Situation with three tiers of neighbouring cells are considered when mobile compares three base stations and chooses the base station with the strongest signal.

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  • Sharing Building Information using the IFC Data Model for FDS Fire Simulation

    Dimyadi, Johannes; Spearpoint, M.; Amor, R. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper describes part of a research project that looks into the potential and challenge of using the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) open standard building information model in fire engineering design. In particular the paper describes work undertaken to share building geometry and other information with the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) fire simulation model. A commercially available building information modeling (BIM) authoring application has been used to create building geometries and export IFC data files. A web-based conversion tool has been created to generate FDS input data given the output from a dedicated fire engineering IFC parser tool. The capabilities and outcome of data sharing process is illustrated in this paper using a simple test case building.

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  • The impact of wireless LAN security on performance for different windows operating systems

    Kolahi, Samad; Narayan, Shaneel; Nguyen, Du D.T.; Sunarto, Yonathan; Mani, Paul (2008-07-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper investigates the impact of various encryption techniques (WEP-64, WEP-128 and WPA) on performance of wireless LANs for Windows operating systems (Windows Server 2003, Windows XP and Windows Vista) and for both TCP and UDP protocols. The parameters considered are throughput and response time. The results indicate that security mechanism does influence the wireless performance and different operating systems provide various results.

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  • Performance evaluation of virtual private network protocols in Windows 2003 environment

    Narayan, Shaneel; Kolahi, Samad; Brooking, Kris; de Vere, Simon (2008-12-20)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a technology that provides secure communication for data as it transits through insecure regions of information technology infrastructure. With prolific development of the Internet, businesses nowadays implement VPN tunnels using different protocols that guarantee data authenticity and security between multiple sites connected using public telecommunication infrastructure. VPN provides a low-cost alternative to leasing a line to establish communication between sites. In this research we empirically evaluate performance difference between three commonly used VPN protocols, namely Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Secure Socket Layer (SSL). We compare performance differences in these protocols by implementing each using different algorithms in a Windows Server 2003 environment. Results obtained indicate that throughput in a VPN tunnel can range from approximately 40 to 90Mbps depending on the choice of protocol, algorithm and window size. These three attributes also govern CPU utilization of VPN servers.

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  • The Garden City of the 21st century

    Bradbury, Matthew (2002-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2014 the prestigious Wolfson Economics Prize (2014) was awarded to David Rudlin of URBED, for answering the question “How would you deliver a new Garden City which is visionary, economically viable, and popular?” The British Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne announced in 2014 that the first new garden city for 100 years will be constructed at Ebbbsfleet (2015) in Kent, UK, to provide 15,000 homes. These two projects strongly suggest the power that Ebenezer Howard’s (Howard, 1902) original concept of Garden City still has. Yet even a cursory inspection of the two projects and the current debate in the UK show little new, unlike the radical combination of working and living within a hybrid of garden and countryside that Howard originally advanced. This paper suggests a way in which landscape architects can frame the renewed interest in the Garden City by building on the tradition of Howard’s radical inquiry. Taking a combination of techniques from environmental planning and traditional garden making the author develops a planning methodology to demonstrate how a new new garden city might be built. The paper is illustrated by two case studies designed by the author; the design of a resort in Guangdong Province, PR China [Beixing Resort Development] and a subdivision in Auckland New Zealand. [Paramuka Valley Subdivision, West Auckland] GIS mapping is used as a planning tool to analyse the sites through the mapping of important environmental features such as remnant indigenous vegetation and overland flow paths. A complex dialogue between the remediation of a native ecology through the preservation and reinstatement of indigenous hydrology and the preservation and replanting of native eco tones is developed. At the same time garden making procedures are deployed, the introduction of exotic species and the deliberate and artificial manipulation of topography. An architectural programme is introduced into this complex landscape conversation, not as an assembly of building types, but rather as a collection of social desires, a gradient from private to public space mediated through the landscape. The result is a new kind of garden city that develops an innovative social realm for the citizens, one in which a connection and awareness of the sustainable environment is central to a new garden city.

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  • Measuring eCommerce website success

    Ghandour, Ahmad; Benwell, George L; Deans, Kenneth R; Pillai, Paul (2008)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents a research model, which is built on communication theory (Shannon and Weaver 1948) and DeLone and McLean’s (1992, 2003) information system model, to identify eCommerce website success dimensions. The research model is aiming to make a contribution to literature by identifying and incorporating dimensions of success relevant to eCommerce websites. Further empirical research is required to validate the finding.

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  • Reflections: Te Kura Unua 2006

    Reilly, Michael (2006)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Paper presented at Te Kura Unua. Te Kura Unua is an annual research exchange hui, which brings together staff and post-graduate students from Te Tumu and Te Kawa a Māui, School of Māori Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, in an effort to share the research interest of both schools and develop collaborative research relationships between the two schools. Te Kura Unua began in 2004 and is hosted alternately every year by each school.

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  • Beginning a conversation: writing a history about Mangaia

    Reilly, Michael (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Imagine the following scene: Rarotonga International Airport, the date 26 April 1988. A young Pacific historian is standing in front of a weighing machine at the domestic check in. About to place his bags on the tray, he is told that the counter staff must first weigh him. Has he heard right? But they insist and reluctantly, in front of the other passengers, his weight is carefully recorded, before his bags are checked through. The plane is finally called, and being impatient to be off he is the first passenger to arrive at the plane. But he is told off to the side by the crew, so that two students from the local theological college can enter first. Finally, after the other passengers board, he is allowed on. Forty minutes in a small two engined turbo prop high above the dark blue green sea of the Pacific, and he cannot see an island in sight. Then as the plane banks, there to the right a solid triangle of land suddenly emerges on the horizon, its coastline lapped by the rolling waves of the ocean. As the plane descends the young Pacific historian looks out of the window at the land. This is the island of Mangaia, famed amongst Pacific scholars for the learned ethnographies written about it since the nineteenth century. But the island fails to impress the historian: the land seems to comprise barren grey rocks rising up from the seas; there are no sandy inviting beaches, no coconut trees bathed by the waters in the lagoon, not even a sign of life, no habitations, no houses, nothing. Just bush and rock. Amongst the anxieties of arrival, he also experiences disappointment: the land seems desolate and forbidding.

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  • Poia atu / mai (?) taku poi – The Polynesian Origins of Poi

    Paringatai, Karyn (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Poi is recognised around the world as a performance item unique to Māori. The word poi refers to a Māori dance or game performed with a ball-like object, to which a cord of varying length is attached. Poi refers to both the ball and the dance, which normally includes hitting and swinging the ball on its string, usually accompanied by music or a chant of some kind. One of New Zealand’s most renowned anthropologists, Sir Peter Buck, who was an authoritative figure spearheading the research into the material culture of the Māori, states that “the women’s poi dance … used an accessory in the form of the poi ball which is unique for Polynesia.” This is a common view of poi. However, this paper questions the uniqueness of poi to the Māori people by showing that the origins of poi can be found in other regions of Polynesia. Specifically, it will trace the movement of poi from Western to Eastern Polynesia; the same path taken by Māori during their migration to New Zealand. It will look at ball games from islands throughout Polynesia with forms and functions similar to those of poi to demonstrate the evolution of poi towards its use in Māori society. Poia atu taku poi, wania atu taku poi (swing far my poi, skim onward my poi) are the age-old words used figuratively in poi compositions to send the poi on a journey over the land and its people; visiting mountains, rivers, forests, villages, whānau (families), hapü (sub-tribes), and iwi (tribes). The words demonstrate the importance of the connections a composer of poi compositions has with each of the above entities. Using this saying I pose the question: Poia atu taku poi? Poia mai taku poi? Did Māori send the poi to the world or was the poi sent to them?

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