142 results for Conference paper, Otago University Research Archive

  • Antecedent of brand trust in e-tertiary education

    Chung, Kim-Choy; Fam, Kim-Shyan; Holdsworth, David K (2007-06-02)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Trust decreases the perceived risk of using a service. Since e-learners have no direct contact with the education providers, trust plays an important role in an e-tertiary setting. In a review of the literature, hypotheses are developed that suggest that the antecedent of brand trust in e-tertiary education is related to institutional and courseware design assurance factors, site quality and public awareness. A conceptual model summarizing the hypotheses is subsequently validated in an empirical study.

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  • Clustering of childhood asthma hospital admissions in New Zealand, 1999-2004

    Hales, Simon; Sabel, Clive E; Exeter, Daniel J; Crane, Julian; Woodward, Alistair (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper was presented by the Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, the Department of Geography, University of Canterbury, the School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St. Andrews and the School of Public Health, University of Auckland

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  • Machiavellian marketing: justifying ends and means in the modern politics

    Harris, Phil (2003)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Niccolo Machiavelli is used as a guide to some of the key issues facing modern government and applies his insights into the effective management and development of civic society. Political Marketing, Good Governance, Lobbying, Ethics and Effective Communication with the Consumer is Developed.

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  • Energy Cultures: A framework for interdisciplinary research

    Stephenson, Janet; Lawson, Rob; Carrington, Gerry; Barton, Barry; Thorsnes, Paul (2010)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The Energy Cultures framework aims to assist in understanding the factors that influence energy consumption behaviour, and to help identify opportunities for behaviour change. Building on a history of attempts to offer multi-disciplinary integrating models of energy behaviour, we take a culture-based approach to behaviour, while drawing also from cultural theories, actor-network theory, socio-technical systems, and lifestyles literature. The framework provides a structure for addressing the problem of multiple interpretations of ‘behaviour’ by suggesting that it is influenced by the interactions between cognitive norms, energy practices and material culture. By conceptualising the research arena, the framework creates a common point of reference for the multi-disciplinary research team. The Energy Cultures framework has proven to be unexpectedly fruitful. It has assisted in the design of the 3-year research programme, which includes a number of different qualitative and quantitative methodologies. In application to a given example, it helps to position the complex drivers of behaviour change. Although the framework has not yet been fully tested as to its ability to help integrate findings from our various research methods, we believe the Energy Cultures framework has promise in furthering interdisciplinary studies of energy behaviours in a wide variety of situations, being relevant to different contexts and different scales.

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  • Beyond consultation: Getting good outcomes for everyone in cross-cultural resource consent practice

    Kanawa, Lisa; Stephenson, Janet; O'Brien, Marg (2009)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    When the Resource Management Act (RMA) was introduced in 1991 it brought in new requirements for the consideration of Māori knowledge and values. Nearly 20 years on, consultation with Māori has become a normal part of the resource consent process, and many best practice guidelines are available on how to consult. Less attention has been paid to what a good outcome might look like and how this might be achieved. Our research seeks to identify what makes for good resource consent processes where Māori knowledge and values are given appropriate consideration and inclusion in the process and outcomes. We report here on the first four stages of a 3-year research process. Firstly, a review of formal national guidelines on consultation and incorporating Māori values in decision making. Secondly, analysis of Environment Court decisions and how the court deals with Māori witnesses and their knowledge. Thirdly, interviews with Māori and Pākehā (New Zealanders of European descent) involved in resource consent processes in a variety of roles. Finally, we discuss a case study of a “win–win” situation in which both the hapū (kinship group) and the developer of a significant coastal development are happy with the process and outcomes in a situation where significant cultural values were at stake.

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  • Advances in conservation of Māori textiles; analysis and identification

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Lowe, Bronwyn J.; Paterson, Rachel A. (2016)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    A number of new methods and technologies for investigating Māori textiles have emerged from ten years of research in the Department of Applied Sciences - Clothing and Textile Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Research projects undertaken include development of numerous identification methods for textile plants endemic to New Zealand (bright field microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Micro-Computed tomography (micro-CT), Polarised Light Microscopy (PLM)); exploration and improvement of safe display parameters for naturally-dyed Māori textiles (artificial light-ageing, microfading); and testing the efficacy of consolidants recommended for remedial conservation treatment of black-dyed muka (fibre) from harakeke (New Zealand flax, Phormium tenax). Of note is the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of the work undertaken (research partnerships with iwi (Māori tribal grouping), customary weaving practitioners, New Zealand museums, conservation laboratories and other University departments), in addition to the adaptation of international standard textile testing methods to better reflect the artefact types of interest (for instance testing of fibre aggregates rather than woven European fabrics). Research outcomes are of relevance to practitioners and artists as well as those caring for Māori taonga, and have added to knowledge about both Māori textiles, and plants and dyes used in Māori textiles production.

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  • Tourism and mobility

    Hall, C Michael (2004)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The paper is designed to introduce the special session on tourism and mobility with Hall, Coles, Duval and Bell.

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  • Methods for identifying plant materials in Māori and Pacific textiles

    Lowe, Bronwyn J; Smith, Catherine A (2012)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Investigating the range of plant species used in Māori and Pacific textiles can help to understand the diversity and relationships among whatu and raranga techniques and art forms. Although the style and construction of Māori and Pacific textile artefacts often give clues as to the plant species used, positive species identification is not always possible from visual inspection. This may be due to the age and condition of the artefact, or effects of leaf processing such as splitting, softening, stripping or dying. A range of laboratory methods and published resources are however available to help with the identification process. Understanding the internal and surface anatomy of raw leaf material (e.g. Carr and Cruthers 2007; Carr et. al. 2009), the effects of leaf preparation for weaving on leaf anatomy (e.g. King 2003) and the expected condition of specimens sampled from artefacts can aid the interpretation of data collected in the laboratory. The most appropriate method of specimen preparation is another important consideration. This paper provides a review of microscopy and tomography techniques and online resources, which have been trialled and implemented in the Clothing and Textile Sciences Department at the University of Otago for the identification of plant species of interest in New Zealand and the Pacific. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and resources for identifying plant materials in artefacts will be discussed.

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  • Re-examining conservation precepts - implications for conservation eductation

    Scott, Marcelle; Smith, Catherine Ann (2011-09-19)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The cross-cultural and interdisciplinary nature of cultural materials conservation has been a prominent feature of the field’s discourse in recent decades. However, in considering the cross-cultural aspects of conservation practice, the authors and others have argued that conservators’ consultation and collaboration with community groups and indigenous people is frequently mediated by others (see for example Smith and Scott 2009, Edmonds and Wild 2000). In practice, much interdisciplinary activity in conservation to date could be critically described as multidisciplinary, characterized by Petrie (1976, 9) as a situation where ‘…everyone [does] his or her thing with little or no necessity for any one participant to be aware of any other participant’s work.’ More recently, conservation as a social act has gained prominence in the literature. In the introduction to the book Conservation: Principles, Dilemmas and Uncomfortable Truths, Richmond and Bracker acknowledge that conservation ‘is a socially constructed activity with numerous public stakeholders and those of us who act in the name of conservation do so ‘on behalf of society’ (2009, xvi–xiv). Global concerns of sustainability, often discussed in terms of environmental, economic and social impacts, are now fundamental to conservation decision-making. In 2000 the Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM) introduced a new clause into the code of ethics to acknowledge the potential for conservation practices to negatively impact the environment, one of the few professional codes internationally to do so, although presumably this will change in the near future. In previous research by the authors (Smith and Scott 2009), members of the AICCM and the New Zealand Conservators of Cultural Materials Pu Manaaki Kahurangi (NZCCM) were surveyed on their views of the respective bodies’ codes. While the majority of respondents did consider the new clause important, a number were not sure that the clause itself had influenced practice. It was suggested that the changes which had occurred were as a result of general shifts in private and social philosophies and actions. While certainly reflecting a widely held opinion of the broader population, the AICCM acknowledgement of environmental impact is one of the few statements that translate personal practice into the professional conservation canon. These examples of the ways in which the field’s precepts and accepted norms are described, contested, advanced and refined demonstrate a change in focus and an expanding role for conservation, beyond the material and the single object focus. Drawing on the ICOM-CC 2011 conference theme this paper seeks to contribute to the burgeoning discussion calling for a broader, more inclusive role for conservation. The authors concur with the view that the future relevance and sustainability of conservation is dependent on a re-evaluation of our professional precepts, ethics, and working practices to more fully embrace and reflect interdisciplinary and cross-cultural ways of working, and that conservators must locate our practice within overarching global issues of poverty, human rights, ethics, climate change and sustainability. As more and more members of the conservation community are actively calling for broader engagement then it behoves educational programmes to incorporate these elements into the curriculum. This paper considers the implications of this changing role for conservation pedagogy.

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  • Social perceptions of climate change in Queenstown's ski industry: a framework of contextual vulnerability

    Hopkins, Debbie (2012)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The tourism industry both contributes to – and is affected by climate change. Many tourism sub-sectors rely on the local climate as a key element to their tourism offering, non less that the ski industry. As a result of this, the ski industry has been identified as particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change which could include increased extreme events, increased variability and increased average temperatures. Yet these manifestations are intrinsically localised, not only between countries, but regions and specific ski fields. Elevation, aspect, water resources and management structure are just some of the factors which play into degrees of vulnerability. This paper is empirically focused on the Queenstown Lakes region of New Zealand, as a popular tourism destination, and the home of 6 commercial ski field operations. Qualitative interviews with industry stakeholders identified a range of perceptions regarding threats and opportunities for the region. While primarily focusing on climate change, a wider web of contextual risks is identified, to place climate change amongst the other challenges for the region. This paper considers perceived risks, and barriers to engagement with climate change for tourism stakeholders. It also addresses opportunities raised by interview participants namely, the relatively increased vulnerability of neighbouring competitors and important international tourism market, Australia and the use of snowmaking to reduce the risk of weather variability. This paper finds a multitude of perceptions regarding vulnerability and concluded that considering context vulnerability, rather than the outcome of climate change alone, is vital in order to address the risks associated with climate change effectively.

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  • The Mobility Preferences of Generation Y: Transitioning Towards a Sustainable Transport System?

    Hopkins, Debbie (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The 21st Century is on the move. The automobile is one of late modernity’s most highly recognisable and contested artefacts and the hegemonic class of contemporary everyday mobility in most industrialised countries. This has led to the design of socio-technical mobility systems which support and reinforce automobile dependency, often to the detriment of alternative transport modes and under the assumption of continued growth in automobility. However, a counter narrative has emerged. Contesting the current automobility paradigm are reported variations to generation Y mobilities when compared to older generations. Generation Y is less likely to learn to drive and those with a driver’s licence are driving less and are less likely to own a vehicle. Yet while a pattern of decreasing youth licensing has been reported in Sweden, Norway, Great Britain, Canada, Japan, South Korea and Germany, little is known about the drivers of this change, and what it could mean for future transport demands. To date, there has been little theoretical examination of this phenomenon. Drawing from socio-technical transitions and the Multi-Level Perspective (MLP), this paper addresses this gap. Furthermore, it advances explorations of cultural and socio-spatial niches which have received less attention within the MLP literature. Perspectives from environmental sociology frame the discussion and are used to investigate whether the changes to generation Y mobilities are, in fact, the start of a socio-technical transition, which could replace the current transport regime. The evidence suggests that generation Y mobility trends represent a crack in the current regime of automobility, which may be sustained in the long-term.

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  • Understanding Sustainable mobility: The potential of electric vehicles

    Stephenson, Janet; Hopkins, Debbie; Scott, Michelle (2014)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Rising awareness of the environmental impacts of dominant mobility practices lead to the development of the sustainable mobility paradigm. This paradigm advocates three features of a mobility system: 1. A reduced need to travel, 2. Modal shift towards more sustainable options, and 3. Reduced vehicle kilometres travelled. In this paper, two sets of data are presented to explore the potential of electric vehicles to contribute to a more sustainable mobility system. First, data from an international Delphi of transport experts shows how a sustainable future can be characterised by different features: efficient internal combustion engine vehicles, electric vehicles, and reduced personal car ownership. Thus electric vehicles are presented as both an opportunity and a threat in relation to sustainable mobility. A second body of empirical material is drawn from interviews with electric vehicle owners, and discusses the drivers and barriers to ownership. Interestingly, participants suggest changing mobility practices associated with electric vehicle ownership, evidenced by decreasing kilometres travelled. The paper concludes by suggesting that there may be potential for electric vehicles to contribute to a sustainable mobility future through modified mobility practices and renewable energy sources in New Zealand.

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  • Beginning a conversation: writing a history about Mangaia

    Reilly, Michael (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Imagine the following scene: Rarotonga International Airport, the date 26 April 1988. A young Pacific historian is standing in front of a weighing machine at the domestic check in. About to place his bags on the tray, he is told that the counter staff must first weigh him. Has he heard right? But they insist and reluctantly, in front of the other passengers, his weight is carefully recorded, before his bags are checked through. The plane is finally called, and being impatient to be off he is the first passenger to arrive at the plane. But he is told off to the side by the crew, so that two students from the local theological college can enter first. Finally, after the other passengers board, he is allowed on. Forty minutes in a small two engined turbo prop high above the dark blue green sea of the Pacific, and he cannot see an island in sight. Then as the plane banks, there to the right a solid triangle of land suddenly emerges on the horizon, its coastline lapped by the rolling waves of the ocean. As the plane descends the young Pacific historian looks out of the window at the land. This is the island of Mangaia, famed amongst Pacific scholars for the learned ethnographies written about it since the nineteenth century. But the island fails to impress the historian: the land seems to comprise barren grey rocks rising up from the seas; there are no sandy inviting beaches, no coconut trees bathed by the waters in the lagoon, not even a sign of life, no habitations, no houses, nothing. Just bush and rock. Amongst the anxieties of arrival, he also experiences disappointment: the land seems desolate and forbidding.

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  • Poia atu / mai (?) taku poi – The Polynesian Origins of Poi

    Paringatai, Karyn (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Poi is recognised around the world as a performance item unique to Māori. The word poi refers to a Māori dance or game performed with a ball-like object, to which a cord of varying length is attached. Poi refers to both the ball and the dance, which normally includes hitting and swinging the ball on its string, usually accompanied by music or a chant of some kind. One of New Zealand’s most renowned anthropologists, Sir Peter Buck, who was an authoritative figure spearheading the research into the material culture of the Māori, states that “the women’s poi dance … used an accessory in the form of the poi ball which is unique for Polynesia.” This is a common view of poi. However, this paper questions the uniqueness of poi to the Māori people by showing that the origins of poi can be found in other regions of Polynesia. Specifically, it will trace the movement of poi from Western to Eastern Polynesia; the same path taken by Māori during their migration to New Zealand. It will look at ball games from islands throughout Polynesia with forms and functions similar to those of poi to demonstrate the evolution of poi towards its use in Māori society. Poia atu taku poi, wania atu taku poi (swing far my poi, skim onward my poi) are the age-old words used figuratively in poi compositions to send the poi on a journey over the land and its people; visiting mountains, rivers, forests, villages, whānau (families), hapü (sub-tribes), and iwi (tribes). The words demonstrate the importance of the connections a composer of poi compositions has with each of the above entities. Using this saying I pose the question: Poia atu taku poi? Poia mai taku poi? Did Māori send the poi to the world or was the poi sent to them?

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  • Pacific Island women, body image and sport

    Schaaf, Michelle R (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This article analyses the representation of Pacific women from an Orientalist theoretical framework. The analysis traces prominent representations of Pacific women within early colonial and Christian discourses, and dominant representations since colonisation. Included in this analysis is a discussion of the fantasy of Western men, that is, of the ‘easy’ Pacific women. One of the central arguments of this article is that the reality of the ideal Pacific female body-shape from a Pacific perspective is not only in stark contrast to the Western ideal, but is also in variance with the imagined erotic archetype of Western men. To locate this analysis within the contemporary diasporic milieu, case-studies of Pacific women in the sport of netball will be used to determine the impact of Orientalist-like representations of body-shape and erotic fantasy on Pacific women now residing in New Zealand, and to highlight the differences between the Pacific and Western body-shape ideals.

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  • He Kura Māori, he Kura Hāhi

    Matthews, Nathan (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Church initiated and operated Māori secondary boarding schools have existed in Aotearoa in various forms since the arrival of the missionaries in the early 19th century. Unfortunately, these schools have contributed to the colonization process, as they have in many other parts of the world, accelerating assimilation of the Indigenous people and the rapid decline of the Indigenous language, in this case, te reo Māori (Māori language). One of the Church boarding schools primary roles in Aotearoa is to act as a vehicle for the proliferation of Christian beliefs. As a result many educationalists have proposed that the “civilizing” intentions of the missionaries was to colonise Māori children. However, I propose that the amalgamation of both the Church schools and Māori communities created a hybrid of Māori culture; a Māori Catholic culture. As a result I propose that these schools, since their inception, have contributed significantly to the development of Māori society, particularly in the production of dynamic Māori leaders who have had a compelling influence on their Māori communities and Māori society and in some instances on the nation state. Therefore, this paper will examine the development of Māori leadership within the Church secondary boarding schools. It will discuss the way in which these schools have, or have not, responded to the constantly changing social and political conditions, in which they exist. The ability to respond to these changes determines the type of leadership that is produced and how effective it is. Hato Paora College, a Catholic Māori boy’s school in Feilding, will be used as an example of this type of schooling. The way in which it has attempted to adapt to meet the social, educational and cultural needs, of its students and their communities in producing effective Māori leaders will be reviewed.

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  • Commuting in Wellington: a geographic econometric analysis of commute mode, residential location and car ownership

    de Róiste, Mairéad; Daglish, Toby; Sağlam, Yiğit; Law, RIchard (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Finding the Quality in Quantity: Establishing Trust For Volunteered Geographic Information

    Severinsen, Jeremy; Reitsma, Femke (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Current status and future directions of mobile GIS

    Müller, Markus U.; Medyckyj-Scott, David; Cowie, Andrew; Heuer, Tim-Hinnerk; Roudier, Pierre (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Sources of uncertainty in a Cellular Automata for vegetation change

    Whitsed, Rachel; Smallbone, Lisa (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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