19 results for Conference paper, Modify

  • Field studies to investigate Impact of increasing R-value of building envelope on winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses

    Su, Bin (2017-05-10T05:38:23Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    PURPOSE / CONTEXT The study investigates relationships of winter indoor relative humidity and R-value of building envelope of the Auckland houses. METHODOLOGY / APPROACH Field study of indoor micro climatic conditions. Air temperatures and relative humidity adjacent to floors and ceilings of different indoor spaces of the two houses with different R-value in their envelopes and shaded outdoor spaces were continuously measured and recorded at 15 minute intervals, 24 hours a day, by Lascar EL-USB-2 USB Humidity Data Logger during the winter months. RESULTS The study identifies the differences of winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses with different insulation and glazing in their envelopes and the major problems of building thermal design of local house with lightweight timber frame construction. KEY FINDINGS / IMPLICATIONS Increasing R-value in building envelope of Auckland houses in accordance with the requirements from NZS 4218:1996 to NZS 4218:2009 can significantly in- crease 19.6% of winter time when indoor relative humidity are 40% and 60%. Maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% can minimize the indirect health effects. ORIGINALITY Quantitative relationships between R-value in building envelope and winter indoor relative humidity, and the identified thermal design problems of local houses with lightweight timber frame construction can be good references for improving indoor health conditions of the future Auckland housing development.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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  • BIM interoperability limitations : Australian and Malaysian rail projects.

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, T.; Behnam, A. (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building information modelling (BIM) is defined as a process involving the generation and management of digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. The purpose of interoperability in integrated or “open” BIM is to facilitate the information exchange between different digital systems, models and tools. There has been effort towards data interoperability with development of open source standards and object- oriented models, such as industry foundation classes (IFC) for vertical infrastructure. However, the lack of open data standards for the information exchange for horizontal infrastructure limits the adoption and effectiveness of integrated BIM. The paper outlines two interoperability issues for construction of rail infrastructure. The issues are presented in two case study reports, one from Australia and one from Malaysia. The each case study includes: a description of the project, the application of BIM in the project, a discussion of the promised BIM interoperability solution plus the identification of the unresolved lack of interoperability for horizontal infrastructure project management. The Moreton Bay Rail project in Australia introduces general software interoperability issues. The Light Rail Extension project in Kuala Lumpur outlines an example of the integration problems related to two different location data structures. The paper highlights how the continuing lack of data interoperability limits utilisation of integrated BIM for horizontal infrastructure rail projects.

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  • Construction management scheduling and control : the familiar historical overview.

    Behman, A.; Harfield, T.; Kenley, Russell (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper suggests that ‘management by exception’ is an historical default control mechanism based on the perception of control as a static process. However, increasingly scholars claim that a dynamic and proactive systems model is a more effective form of project control. These findings are the result of an historical desktop research method that analysed content from a small sample of scheduling methods and control approaches found in online and university library resources. The concept of control has historically influenced both visualization and analytics of different scheduling methods for construction project management. This paper focuses on two control ideals; static and dynamic control mechanisms. The overview begins with the description of early graphical scheduling techniques: Gantt charts and Harmonogram. It continues with examples of contributors to scheduling and control that include: CPM, PERT, LOB, Flowline and Location Based Management. The finding of this simple history suggests that change is the constant element for project control mechanisms. An object-based digital environment such as the data-rich building information modelling (BIM) appears to be continuing the change for new scheduling methods and control mechanisms.

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  • The use of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers: Changes with time

    Corner-Thomas, RA; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Ridler, AL; Hickson, RE; Greer, AW; Logan, CM; Blair, HT

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The utilisation of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers can support on-farm decision making, thus facilitating improvements in productivity and profitability of the farming enterprise. There are numerous management tools available to farmers, for example, a recent report identified 127 tools that were available to New Zealand farmers (Allen & Wolfert 2011). Although a large number of tools are accessible to farmers, a survey of sheep farmers conducted in 2012 by Corner-Thomas et al. (2015) identified many that were utilised by only a small percentage of farmers. This indicates that there is the potential for increased uptake of management tools which, if relevant, may lead to benefits in on-farm productivity. The aim of the current study was to determine for sheep farmers in New Zealand, if use of farm-management tools had changed over a two-year period.

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  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System For Live Spatialisation

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A; Norris, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

    White, BD; Rainier, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    While considerable effort goes into equipping undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and medicine with knowledge discovery skills and an understanding of the scientific literature, many of them complete their first degrees with a relatively basic level of competence. Undergraduate science education demands an intensive development of subject knowledge and technical skills with less emphasis on the primary literature, and unless an information literacy element is expressly built into science programmes undergraduate students are not routinely required to make use of library resources (Bogucka & Wood, 2009; Wiegant, Scager, & Boonstra, 2011). Postgraduate study, particularly at masters and doctoral level, places quite a different level of demand on students, and even to formulate a research question requires an extensive knowledge of the existing literature. The first part of the thesis journey is the literature review which provides a theoretical and methodological grounding of the whole project, but students often arrive at postgraduate study poorly equipped to perform this task (Hoffmann, Antwi-Nsiah, Feng, & Stanley, 2008; Miller, 2014). Those skills that they have acquired tend to be based around Google and Google Scholar (Wu & Chen, 2014) which provide a good result for relatively little effort, but which lack the functionality to fully support a literature review at this level (Johnson & Simonsen, 2015). Increasing internationalisation of postgraduate education is another factor impacting on this situation, although it would be wrong to assume that English-speaking students or those from “developed countries” possess the appropriate skills for an advanced degree literature review.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • Sustainably yours : community development and a sustainably just future – ACDA and IACD Conference Proceedings

    Jennings, Anne; Aaron, Nicole; Calvin, James R.; Robeson, Bonnie L.; Chakravarti, Dipankar; Baker, John; Tong, Dalton; Sheats, Daniel W.; Purcell, Anne; Mann, Samuel; Eden-Mann, Phoebe; Smith, Lesley; Ker, Glenys; Osborne, Phil; Crawford, Philip Alexander (2017-07-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 2017 International Association for Community Development (IACD) and Aotearoa Community Development Association’s (ACDA) joint Community Development Conference was held at Unitec in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland from 15-17 February 2017. The conference brought together community development practitioners from around the world to discuss the application of the UN’s recently-established Sustainable Development Goals. These proceedings draw together five papers delivered at the conference along with abstracts and bios from all presenters. The papers in this publication comprise the proceedings of the meeting mentioned on the cover. They reflect the authors’ opinions and, their inclusion in this publication does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the editors, ePress or Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.

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  • tactile.motion: An iPad Based Performance Interface For Increased Expressivity In Diffusion Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Assessment Techniques For New Mechatronic Instruments as Applied to speaker.motion

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The field of mechatronic instrument design has developed substantially over the past decade. With these new instruments the common musical assessment techniques that are generally applied to western art music are no longer sufficient as the instrument builders need to assess the design and production of the mechatronic instrument itself as well as the way it might be used musically and expressively by composers and performers. This paper introduces ideas about the new approach to the assessment of mechatronic instruments that is needed to fully assess them. After introducing the new assessment technique principals and discussing why a holistic approach is needed in this particular field the authors then go on the provide a case study on the speaker.motion mechatronic loudspeaker system that has been assessed in the proposed way. The paper provides details on both a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the speaker.motion system and how the combination of the two studies is what allows a full assessment of the instrument, and of its expressive potential.

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  • Building adaption for waste minimisation: impact of policies

    Mithraratne, N

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Carnival and Construction – Towards a Scaffolding for the Inclusion of ICT in the Construction Process

    McMeel, Dermott (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. In this paper we explore the process of construction, we consider the construc- tion site as a mediated collaborative environment in which many specialist crafts and esoteric skills are present and negotiated. Concrete information when pass onto a construction site becomes part of a fluid morphing object, the validity and meaning of information can change—or be lost—depending on where and when it is. We look at current models of construction and actual construction process and we explore the notion of Carnival as a tool to reconcile the concrete and fluid aspects to communication dynamics of mediated group working in general and of construction site practice specifically.

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  • Intrepid traveller: the University of Auckland Library on the e-book journey

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    E-books continue to thrive with e-book technology companies developing a variety of solutions for libraries, many of which offer excellent support for teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to present the University of Auckland Library’s experiences in integrating e-books into the learning environment. This is a complex issue and will be considered from different perspectives: selection, purchasing, providing access, cataloguing, and user support and satisfaction.

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  • Dirty Work

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: Proc. W1 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference 6-10 September – Designer, User, Meaning Maker: Rethinking Relationships for a More Creative HCI. pp. 26-29. Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. This research explores the potency of dirt as a category for understanding digital communications. Our eventual target domain is communication in the construction industry, which is characterised by contractual formalities on the one hand (working documents, specifications, forms), and informal communications on the other (onsite instructions, scribbles on paper). Electronic communications (such as email and message boards) represent hybrid formal-informal media in the increasingly litigious workplace. On the way to understanding the untidiness of the construction site, we analysed the use of formal and informal communications in group working by students in the design and construction of an interactive digital art installation. Our research so far draws on the interesting relationship between dirt, authority, and human-computer interaction.

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  • Talking Dirty

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard; Lee, John (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    We analyse the emergence and use of formal and informal communication tools in group working to aid in understanding the complexity of construction projects. Our test case is the design and build of an interactive digital installation in an exhibition space, involving students. After the project we conducted focus group studies to elicit insights into the effective use of the digital communications available for the project. We recount key insights from the study and examine how digital messaging devices are contributing to or hindering creative discussion. Whereas the construction process is concerned with the removal of dirt and re-ordering, in this paper we reflect on construction’s ritualistic, contractual and unauthorized aspects, and dirt’s role within them. We draw on Bakhtin’s theories of the carnival in exploring ritual, and the mixing of the un-sanctioned (rumour) with the official (contractual). How does dirt impinge on issues of communication, open discussion, and the move towards “partnering” in construction practice? We conjecture that while physical dirt might be unpleasant, the removal of other forms of metaphorical dirt hampers construction as an efficient and creative process.

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  • E-books - essentials or extras? The University of Auckland Library experience

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2004)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    The e-publishing industry is developing rapidly, providing new opportunities for libraries, but creating new challenges as well. Questions on how best to integrate e-books into the learning environment are pressing. In 2003, the University of Auckland Library provided access to nearly 80,000 e-books through the library catalogue only. This paper will explore some of the theoretical and practical issues of implementing e-books in the University of Auckland Library, covering such issues as: - Integration - Workflow - Differences in perception/acceptance of digital texts - Response from students and staff - User preferences and reasons for these

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  • Diffusing Diffusion: A History of the Technological Advances in Spatial Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • BRIEF COMMUNICATION: The potential of the New Zealand goat industry

    Carr, AJ; Schreurs; Lopez-Villalobos; Thomas, D; Tozer, PR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The New Zealand goat industry is evolving and there is potential for expansion of its export products. The production and value of the New Zealand goat industry has been explored previously when the industry was in its infancy (Sheppard & O’Donnell 1979), at a time when Mohair production was seen to be ‘the most profitable goat farming enterprise’. Since then major expansion has occurred in the production and export of dairy-goat products, and the production of quality Boer goat meat is under consideration. In order for further progress to be made, knowledge of the current production levels and value of the goat industry, and its potential for expansion is required. Using information describing the current situation of the goat industry (Scholtens et al. 2017) and the value of the goat (Lopez-Lozano et al. 2017), a model was created to estimate the current and potential production and value of the New Zealand goat industry by 2025.

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