75 results for Conference paper, Share

  • Field studies to investigate Impact of increasing R-value of building envelope on winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses

    Su, Bin (2017-05-10T05:38:23Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    PURPOSE / CONTEXT The study investigates relationships of winter indoor relative humidity and R-value of building envelope of the Auckland houses. METHODOLOGY / APPROACH Field study of indoor micro climatic conditions. Air temperatures and relative humidity adjacent to floors and ceilings of different indoor spaces of the two houses with different R-value in their envelopes and shaded outdoor spaces were continuously measured and recorded at 15 minute intervals, 24 hours a day, by Lascar EL-USB-2 USB Humidity Data Logger during the winter months. RESULTS The study identifies the differences of winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses with different insulation and glazing in their envelopes and the major problems of building thermal design of local house with lightweight timber frame construction. KEY FINDINGS / IMPLICATIONS Increasing R-value in building envelope of Auckland houses in accordance with the requirements from NZS 4218:1996 to NZS 4218:2009 can significantly in- crease 19.6% of winter time when indoor relative humidity are 40% and 60%. Maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% can minimize the indirect health effects. ORIGINALITY Quantitative relationships between R-value in building envelope and winter indoor relative humidity, and the identified thermal design problems of local houses with lightweight timber frame construction can be good references for improving indoor health conditions of the future Auckland housing development.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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  • BIM interoperability limitations : Australian and Malaysian rail projects.

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, T.; Behnam, A. (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building information modelling (BIM) is defined as a process involving the generation and management of digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. The purpose of interoperability in integrated or “open” BIM is to facilitate the information exchange between different digital systems, models and tools. There has been effort towards data interoperability with development of open source standards and object- oriented models, such as industry foundation classes (IFC) for vertical infrastructure. However, the lack of open data standards for the information exchange for horizontal infrastructure limits the adoption and effectiveness of integrated BIM. The paper outlines two interoperability issues for construction of rail infrastructure. The issues are presented in two case study reports, one from Australia and one from Malaysia. The each case study includes: a description of the project, the application of BIM in the project, a discussion of the promised BIM interoperability solution plus the identification of the unresolved lack of interoperability for horizontal infrastructure project management. The Moreton Bay Rail project in Australia introduces general software interoperability issues. The Light Rail Extension project in Kuala Lumpur outlines an example of the integration problems related to two different location data structures. The paper highlights how the continuing lack of data interoperability limits utilisation of integrated BIM for horizontal infrastructure rail projects.

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  • Construction management scheduling and control : the familiar historical overview.

    Behman, A.; Harfield, T.; Kenley, Russell (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper suggests that ‘management by exception’ is an historical default control mechanism based on the perception of control as a static process. However, increasingly scholars claim that a dynamic and proactive systems model is a more effective form of project control. These findings are the result of an historical desktop research method that analysed content from a small sample of scheduling methods and control approaches found in online and university library resources. The concept of control has historically influenced both visualization and analytics of different scheduling methods for construction project management. This paper focuses on two control ideals; static and dynamic control mechanisms. The overview begins with the description of early graphical scheduling techniques: Gantt charts and Harmonogram. It continues with examples of contributors to scheduling and control that include: CPM, PERT, LOB, Flowline and Location Based Management. The finding of this simple history suggests that change is the constant element for project control mechanisms. An object-based digital environment such as the data-rich building information modelling (BIM) appears to be continuing the change for new scheduling methods and control mechanisms.

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  • Bring your own device classroom : issues of digital divides in teaching and learning contexts

    Adhikari, Janak; Mathrani, Anuradha; Parsons, David (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Technology mediated learning provides potentially valuable resources for learners’ academic and social development. However, according to recent researches, as the adoption stages of ICTs advance there arises further levels of digital divides in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the last three years we have been working with one of the earliest secondary school in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. Our research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations. In this paper we present the findings from the investigation into BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of technology mediated learning. Teaching and learning practices are evolving continually across formal and informal spaces, and this study informs us how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process.

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  • The adoption of modern office workspaces by tertiary education institutes : a case study of Unitec

    Vitasovich, A.; Kiroff, Lydia; Boon, John (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Modern office workspaces, and particularly activity-based workspaces (ABW) are emerging in the education sector. The primary reasons for making changes to workspaces vary from institute to institute. Yet, there is limited research on the objectives, the overall value of making these changes, the strategic plans used, the types of workspaces being implemented and the issues faced by higher education institutes, which can potentially affect their users and their associated work practices. Semi-structured in-depth interviews within a case study approach were carried out with three groups of participants: staff that have had previous experience in new types of workspaces, staff that have not worked in such environments, and institutional key decision-makers. Field observations and a review of supporting documentation complemented the interviews. The findings indicate that there are wide-ranging organisational changes occurring within Unitec, and not just simple changes to existing workspaces with the aim of increasing collaboration, reducing facility costs and creating sector alignment. Additionally, ABW are being implemented throughout the organisation based on prototype office spaces in one campus building heavily influenced by commercial workspace design. However, higher academic work practices make unique demands potentially creating tension between the aims of the institution for increased collaboration and interaction and established work patterns. The inclusion of more private quiet spaces is suggested by the interviewees to help staff adapt to these new ways of working. Furthermore, keeping the lines of communication open and regularly updating all staff on the redevelopment of the new workspaces ensures an overall smoother transition.

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  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System For Live Spatialisation

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A; Norris, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

    White, BD; Rainier, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    While considerable effort goes into equipping undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and medicine with knowledge discovery skills and an understanding of the scientific literature, many of them complete their first degrees with a relatively basic level of competence. Undergraduate science education demands an intensive development of subject knowledge and technical skills with less emphasis on the primary literature, and unless an information literacy element is expressly built into science programmes undergraduate students are not routinely required to make use of library resources (Bogucka & Wood, 2009; Wiegant, Scager, & Boonstra, 2011). Postgraduate study, particularly at masters and doctoral level, places quite a different level of demand on students, and even to formulate a research question requires an extensive knowledge of the existing literature. The first part of the thesis journey is the literature review which provides a theoretical and methodological grounding of the whole project, but students often arrive at postgraduate study poorly equipped to perform this task (Hoffmann, Antwi-Nsiah, Feng, & Stanley, 2008; Miller, 2014). Those skills that they have acquired tend to be based around Google and Google Scholar (Wu & Chen, 2014) which provide a good result for relatively little effort, but which lack the functionality to fully support a literature review at this level (Johnson & Simonsen, 2015). Increasing internationalisation of postgraduate education is another factor impacting on this situation, although it would be wrong to assume that English-speaking students or those from “developed countries” possess the appropriate skills for an advanced degree literature review.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • Sustainably yours : community development and a sustainably just future – ACDA and IACD Conference Proceedings

    Jennings, Anne; Aaron, Nicole; Calvin, James R.; Robeson, Bonnie L.; Chakravarti, Dipankar; Baker, John; Tong, Dalton; Sheats, Daniel W.; Purcell, Anne; Mann, Samuel; Eden-Mann, Phoebe; Smith, Lesley; Ker, Glenys; Osborne, Phil; Crawford, Philip Alexander (2017-07-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 2017 International Association for Community Development (IACD) and Aotearoa Community Development Association’s (ACDA) joint Community Development Conference was held at Unitec in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland from 15-17 February 2017. The conference brought together community development practitioners from around the world to discuss the application of the UN’s recently-established Sustainable Development Goals. These proceedings draw together five papers delivered at the conference along with abstracts and bios from all presenters. The papers in this publication comprise the proceedings of the meeting mentioned on the cover. They reflect the authors’ opinions and, their inclusion in this publication does not necessarily constitute endorsement by the editors, ePress or Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.

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  • Building adaption for waste minimisation : impact of policies

    Mithraratne, Nalanie (2015-12-22)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Construction and demolition waste represents a significant wastage of natural resources and energy while also contributing to air pollution. Measures to reduce construction waste include achieving flexibility in design of new buildings, and recovery of materials and components from existing buildings or adaptation of existing buildings to new uses. Although prolonging the building life through designing for adaptation can reduce the rate of demolition, the low rate of building renewal means that material recovery and whole building reuse are equally important in minimising construction waste. While the quality of recovered material/component depends on the original design and recovery process, there is a lack of measures to promote the use of recovered materials. Changes in decision-making on how buildings are designed, demolished and reused can therefore significantly improve the resilience of building stock and reduce the adverse impacts. While theoretical underpinnings of designing for deconstruction or adaptation of existing buildings are well established, their practice depends more on location, policy issues and incentives. This paper discusses the preliminary findings from a research project which aims to develop a set of guidelines on designing buildings for flexibility, based on life-time environmental and financial performance of alternative strategies, and generate data on relative environmental performance of recovered construction materials/components compared with virgin alternatives used in Singapore.

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  • Barriers to building and construction waste reduction, reuse and recycling : a case study of the Australian Capital Region

    Zou, Patrick; Hardy, Robyn; Yang, Rebecca (2015-12-22)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building and construction waste materials continue to be a major problem causing significant environmental impact worldwide. Broad university-industry collaborative research was undertaken in 2014 to identify the barriers, opportunities and strategies for reducing, reusing and recycling building and construction waste materials in the Australian Capital Region (located in the south-eastern corner of Australia and includes the Australian Capital Territory). This paper presents and discusses the results in relation to the barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers. To identify the barriers several workshops and interviews were undertaken. The workshop participants and interviewees were first provided a list of 12 barriers derived from review of relevant literature. They were then asked to think ‘outside of the box’ to identify any more barriers that were not captured in the list. Seven new barriers were identified, resulting in a total of 19 barriers. This research contributes to the field by identifying new barriers and providing corresponding strategies, which were developed together with frontline practitioners and managers. The overall outcomes have led to the development of the second stage of this collaborative research project.

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  • The efficient house innovation : healthful, efficient and sustainable housing for northern and southern climates

    Gillies, Tony; Poulin, Bryan (2015-12-22)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper tracks the Efficient House Innovation (EHI) from 2000 to 2015. The main idea of ‘Dynamic Air’ behind EHI is associated with John Timusk (1987) who recognised existing housing solutions were not sufficiently healthful, efficient or robust. His solution was to bring relatively cool, dry air dynamically through the walls instead of the usual air-tight, static construction. However some problems remained. Starting in 2000, the authors of this paper extended and added features to Timusk’s solution to arrive at the EHI. Initial tests of EHI prototypes indicate the reliable fresh air, robustness of structure and energy efficiency that Timusk envisioned. This paper focuses on EHI prototype testing from 2008 to 2015, with implications for housing in cold, temperate and sub-tropical climates.

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  • BRIEF COMMUNICATION: Assessing the current value of milk, meat and fibre products from the goat industry in New Zealand

    Carr, AJ; schreurs, N; Lopez-Villalobos; Thomas, D; tozer, P; Gray, D

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Goats have a historical record of being productive and valuable to families and communities (Aziz 2010). Small ruminants, which include goats, still have an ‘unfulfilled’ potential despite the numbers of animals farmed and their distribution around the world (Anaeto et al. 2010). Pollot and Wilson (2009) concluded that goats deserve greater attention due to their capacity for producing food. A similar study in New Zealand (Sheppard & O’Donnell 1979), described the uses of goats for meat, skins, milk and mohair and concluded that the goat was valuable, but that the production potential was largely unfulfilled. A recent New Zealand study (Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry 2009) concluded that food-consumption patterns are changing in New Zealand, and globally demand for more diversified products provided an opportunity for goat meat. The objective of this study was to determine the current value of domestic and exported New Zealand goat products and to explore possible future products and their target markets. Many of these product values are gathered from retailers, personal communications and individual producers. This research is an attempt to bring together information that has not yet been gathered to present a current value of the goat in New Zealand.

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  • Assessment Techniques For New Mechatronic Instruments as Applied to speaker.motion

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The field of mechatronic instrument design has developed substantially over the past decade. With these new instruments the common musical assessment techniques that are generally applied to western art music are no longer sufficient as the instrument builders need to assess the design and production of the mechatronic instrument itself as well as the way it might be used musically and expressively by composers and performers. This paper introduces ideas about the new approach to the assessment of mechatronic instruments that is needed to fully assess them. After introducing the new assessment technique principals and discussing why a holistic approach is needed in this particular field the authors then go on the provide a case study on the speaker.motion mechatronic loudspeaker system that has been assessed in the proposed way. The paper provides details on both a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the speaker.motion system and how the combination of the two studies is what allows a full assessment of the instrument, and of its expressive potential.

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  • Building adaption for waste minimisation: impact of policies

    Mithraratne, N

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Carnival and Construction – Towards a Scaffolding for the Inclusion of ICT in the Construction Process

    McMeel, Dermott (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. In this paper we explore the process of construction, we consider the construc- tion site as a mediated collaborative environment in which many specialist crafts and esoteric skills are present and negotiated. Concrete information when pass onto a construction site becomes part of a fluid morphing object, the validity and meaning of information can change—or be lost—depending on where and when it is. We look at current models of construction and actual construction process and we explore the notion of Carnival as a tool to reconcile the concrete and fluid aspects to communication dynamics of mediated group working in general and of construction site practice specifically.

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  • Intrepid traveller: the University of Auckland Library on the e-book journey

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    E-books continue to thrive with e-book technology companies developing a variety of solutions for libraries, many of which offer excellent support for teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to present the University of Auckland Library’s experiences in integrating e-books into the learning environment. This is a complex issue and will be considered from different perspectives: selection, purchasing, providing access, cataloguing, and user support and satisfaction.

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  • Dirty Work

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: Proc. W1 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference 6-10 September – Designer, User, Meaning Maker: Rethinking Relationships for a More Creative HCI. pp. 26-29. Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. This research explores the potency of dirt as a category for understanding digital communications. Our eventual target domain is communication in the construction industry, which is characterised by contractual formalities on the one hand (working documents, specifications, forms), and informal communications on the other (onsite instructions, scribbles on paper). Electronic communications (such as email and message boards) represent hybrid formal-informal media in the increasingly litigious workplace. On the way to understanding the untidiness of the construction site, we analysed the use of formal and informal communications in group working by students in the design and construction of an interactive digital art installation. Our research so far draws on the interesting relationship between dirt, authority, and human-computer interaction.

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  • Talking Dirty

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard; Lee, John (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    We analyse the emergence and use of formal and informal communication tools in group working to aid in understanding the complexity of construction projects. Our test case is the design and build of an interactive digital installation in an exhibition space, involving students. After the project we conducted focus group studies to elicit insights into the effective use of the digital communications available for the project. We recount key insights from the study and examine how digital messaging devices are contributing to or hindering creative discussion. Whereas the construction process is concerned with the removal of dirt and re-ordering, in this paper we reflect on construction’s ritualistic, contractual and unauthorized aspects, and dirt’s role within them. We draw on Bakhtin’s theories of the carnival in exploring ritual, and the mixing of the un-sanctioned (rumour) with the official (contractual). How does dirt impinge on issues of communication, open discussion, and the move towards “partnering” in construction practice? We conjecture that while physical dirt might be unpleasant, the removal of other forms of metaphorical dirt hampers construction as an efficient and creative process.

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