57 results for Conference paper, Share

  • Field studies to investigate Impact of increasing R-value of building envelope on winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses

    Su, Bin (2017-05-10T05:38:23Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    PURPOSE / CONTEXT The study investigates relationships of winter indoor relative humidity and R-value of building envelope of the Auckland houses. METHODOLOGY / APPROACH Field study of indoor micro climatic conditions. Air temperatures and relative humidity adjacent to floors and ceilings of different indoor spaces of the two houses with different R-value in their envelopes and shaded outdoor spaces were continuously measured and recorded at 15 minute intervals, 24 hours a day, by Lascar EL-USB-2 USB Humidity Data Logger during the winter months. RESULTS The study identifies the differences of winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses with different insulation and glazing in their envelopes and the major problems of building thermal design of local house with lightweight timber frame construction. KEY FINDINGS / IMPLICATIONS Increasing R-value in building envelope of Auckland houses in accordance with the requirements from NZS 4218:1996 to NZS 4218:2009 can significantly in- crease 19.6% of winter time when indoor relative humidity are 40% and 60%. Maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% can minimize the indirect health effects. ORIGINALITY Quantitative relationships between R-value in building envelope and winter indoor relative humidity, and the identified thermal design problems of local houses with lightweight timber frame construction can be good references for improving indoor health conditions of the future Auckland housing development.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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  • BIM interoperability limitations : Australian and Malaysian rail projects.

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, T.; Behnam, A. (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building information modelling (BIM) is defined as a process involving the generation and management of digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. The purpose of interoperability in integrated or “open” BIM is to facilitate the information exchange between different digital systems, models and tools. There has been effort towards data interoperability with development of open source standards and object- oriented models, such as industry foundation classes (IFC) for vertical infrastructure. However, the lack of open data standards for the information exchange for horizontal infrastructure limits the adoption and effectiveness of integrated BIM. The paper outlines two interoperability issues for construction of rail infrastructure. The issues are presented in two case study reports, one from Australia and one from Malaysia. The each case study includes: a description of the project, the application of BIM in the project, a discussion of the promised BIM interoperability solution plus the identification of the unresolved lack of interoperability for horizontal infrastructure project management. The Moreton Bay Rail project in Australia introduces general software interoperability issues. The Light Rail Extension project in Kuala Lumpur outlines an example of the integration problems related to two different location data structures. The paper highlights how the continuing lack of data interoperability limits utilisation of integrated BIM for horizontal infrastructure rail projects.

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  • Construction management scheduling and control : the familiar historical overview.

    Behman, A.; Harfield, T.; Kenley, Russell (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper suggests that ‘management by exception’ is an historical default control mechanism based on the perception of control as a static process. However, increasingly scholars claim that a dynamic and proactive systems model is a more effective form of project control. These findings are the result of an historical desktop research method that analysed content from a small sample of scheduling methods and control approaches found in online and university library resources. The concept of control has historically influenced both visualization and analytics of different scheduling methods for construction project management. This paper focuses on two control ideals; static and dynamic control mechanisms. The overview begins with the description of early graphical scheduling techniques: Gantt charts and Harmonogram. It continues with examples of contributors to scheduling and control that include: CPM, PERT, LOB, Flowline and Location Based Management. The finding of this simple history suggests that change is the constant element for project control mechanisms. An object-based digital environment such as the data-rich building information modelling (BIM) appears to be continuing the change for new scheduling methods and control mechanisms.

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  • Understanding driver behaviour: opportunities for greater efficiency

    Scott, Michelle Grace; Lawson, Rob (2016-09)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Road transport contributes a significant amount towards New Zealand’s carbon emissions, mostly from light vehicles. These carbon emissions could be partly reduced by an increase in more efficient driving practices. It has been shown that reductions of 10-20% of fuel are possible without increasing trip times significantly. We conducted this study to understand whether people knew how to drive efficiently, whether they actually ever drove in an efficient manner and what ways there could be to influence people to drive more efficiently. Focus groups were conducted across New Zealand in urban and rural areas with groups of students, young professionals, parents and older people in order to cover different lifestyles and environments. These focus groups covered a wide range of topics including knowledge and practices of efficient driving, learning to drive, infrastructure and aspirations. Our results show that most people reported knowing the things they could do to be more fuel efficient. However, despite this knowledge, they very rarely engaged in these practices. When they did consider fuel efficiency, it was almost always linked to saving fuel costs. Almost no one considered the environmental aspects of driving or fuel use. This shows that there is a clear lack of connection between carbon emissions and driving when people are in their cars. Better messages could be presented to drivers linking their driving practices to carbon emissions and therefore climate change. The findings also showed other areas where more efficient practices and choices could be encouraged, such as advanced driving lessons for new skills, in-car fuel efficiency feedback and better designed public and active transport.

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  • Bring your own device classroom : issues of digital divides in teaching and learning contexts

    Adhikari, Janak; Mathrani, Anuradha; Parsons, David (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Technology mediated learning provides potentially valuable resources for learners’ academic and social development. However, according to recent researches, as the adoption stages of ICTs advance there arises further levels of digital divides in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the last three years we have been working with one of the earliest secondary school in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. Our research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations. In this paper we present the findings from the investigation into BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of technology mediated learning. Teaching and learning practices are evolving continually across formal and informal spaces, and this study informs us how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process.

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  • The adoption of modern office workspaces by tertiary education institutes : a case study of Unitec

    Vitasovich, A.; Kiroff, Lydia; Boon, John (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Modern office workspaces, and particularly activity-based workspaces (ABW) are emerging in the education sector. The primary reasons for making changes to workspaces vary from institute to institute. Yet, there is limited research on the objectives, the overall value of making these changes, the strategic plans used, the types of workspaces being implemented and the issues faced by higher education institutes, which can potentially affect their users and their associated work practices. Semi-structured in-depth interviews within a case study approach were carried out with three groups of participants: staff that have had previous experience in new types of workspaces, staff that have not worked in such environments, and institutional key decision-makers. Field observations and a review of supporting documentation complemented the interviews. The findings indicate that there are wide-ranging organisational changes occurring within Unitec, and not just simple changes to existing workspaces with the aim of increasing collaboration, reducing facility costs and creating sector alignment. Additionally, ABW are being implemented throughout the organisation based on prototype office spaces in one campus building heavily influenced by commercial workspace design. However, higher academic work practices make unique demands potentially creating tension between the aims of the institution for increased collaboration and interaction and established work patterns. The inclusion of more private quiet spaces is suggested by the interviewees to help staff adapt to these new ways of working. Furthermore, keeping the lines of communication open and regularly updating all staff on the redevelopment of the new workspaces ensures an overall smoother transition.

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  • The use of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers: Changes with time

    Corner-Thomas, RA; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Ridler, AL; Hickson, RE; Greer, AW; Logan, CM; Blair, HT

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The utilisation of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers can support on-farm decision making, thus facilitating improvements in productivity and profitability of the farming enterprise. There are numerous management tools available to farmers, for example, a recent report identified 127 tools that were available to New Zealand farmers (Allen & Wolfert 2011). Although a large number of tools are accessible to farmers, a survey of sheep farmers conducted in 2012 by Corner-Thomas et al. (2015) identified many that were utilised by only a small percentage of farmers. This indicates that there is the potential for increased uptake of management tools which, if relevant, may lead to benefits in on-farm productivity. The aim of the current study was to determine for sheep farmers in New Zealand, if use of farm-management tools had changed over a two-year period.

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  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System For Live Spatialisation

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A; Norris, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

    White, BD; Rainier, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    While considerable effort goes into equipping undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and medicine with knowledge discovery skills and an understanding of the scientific literature, many of them complete their first degrees with a relatively basic level of competence. Undergraduate science education demands an intensive development of subject knowledge and technical skills with less emphasis on the primary literature, and unless an information literacy element is expressly built into science programmes undergraduate students are not routinely required to make use of library resources (Bogucka & Wood, 2009; Wiegant, Scager, & Boonstra, 2011). Postgraduate study, particularly at masters and doctoral level, places quite a different level of demand on students, and even to formulate a research question requires an extensive knowledge of the existing literature. The first part of the thesis journey is the literature review which provides a theoretical and methodological grounding of the whole project, but students often arrive at postgraduate study poorly equipped to perform this task (Hoffmann, Antwi-Nsiah, Feng, & Stanley, 2008; Miller, 2014). Those skills that they have acquired tend to be based around Google and Google Scholar (Wu & Chen, 2014) which provide a good result for relatively little effort, but which lack the functionality to fully support a literature review at this level (Johnson & Simonsen, 2015). Increasing internationalisation of postgraduate education is another factor impacting on this situation, although it would be wrong to assume that English-speaking students or those from “developed countries” possess the appropriate skills for an advanced degree literature review.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • Towards a 'pattern language' for spatial simulation models

    O'Sullivan, David; Perry, George L.W. (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Commuting in Wellington: a geographic econometric analysis of commute mode, residential location and car ownership

    de Róiste, Mairéad; Daglish, Toby; Sağlam, Yiğit; Law, RIchard (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Geographical Vector Agent Modelling for Image Classification: Initial Development

    Borna, Kambiz; Sirguey, Pascal; Moore, Antoni (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Our waste our way: a spatial study of household waste management in Betio, Tarawa, Kiribati

    Teburea, Kotee Bauro; Moore, Antoni; Leonard, Greg (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Recent Ice Wastage on the Tasman Glacier Obtained from Geodetic Elevation Changes

    Vivero, Sebastian; Sirguey, Pascal; Fitzsimons, Sean J.; Strong, Delia; Soruco, Alvaro (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • How do different science disciplines represent and compute over ‘space’?

    Gahegan, Mark (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Hotspots of Hector’s Dolphins On the South Coast

    Rodda, Judy; Moore, Antoni (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Extending Point-pattern analysis to polygons using vector representations

    Whigham, Peter A. (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Finding the Quality in Quantity: Establishing Trust For Volunteered Geographic Information

    Severinsen, Jeremy; Reitsma, Femke (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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