11 results for Conference paper, Use commercially

  • Field studies to investigate Impact of increasing R-value of building envelope on winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses

    Su, Bin (2017-05-10T05:38:23Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    PURPOSE / CONTEXT The study investigates relationships of winter indoor relative humidity and R-value of building envelope of the Auckland houses. METHODOLOGY / APPROACH Field study of indoor micro climatic conditions. Air temperatures and relative humidity adjacent to floors and ceilings of different indoor spaces of the two houses with different R-value in their envelopes and shaded outdoor spaces were continuously measured and recorded at 15 minute intervals, 24 hours a day, by Lascar EL-USB-2 USB Humidity Data Logger during the winter months. RESULTS The study identifies the differences of winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses with different insulation and glazing in their envelopes and the major problems of building thermal design of local house with lightweight timber frame construction. KEY FINDINGS / IMPLICATIONS Increasing R-value in building envelope of Auckland houses in accordance with the requirements from NZS 4218:1996 to NZS 4218:2009 can significantly in- crease 19.6% of winter time when indoor relative humidity are 40% and 60%. Maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% can minimize the indirect health effects. ORIGINALITY Quantitative relationships between R-value in building envelope and winter indoor relative humidity, and the identified thermal design problems of local houses with lightweight timber frame construction can be good references for improving indoor health conditions of the future Auckland housing development.

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  • BIM interoperability limitations : Australian and Malaysian rail projects.

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, T.; Behnam, A. (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building information modelling (BIM) is defined as a process involving the generation and management of digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. The purpose of interoperability in integrated or “open” BIM is to facilitate the information exchange between different digital systems, models and tools. There has been effort towards data interoperability with development of open source standards and object- oriented models, such as industry foundation classes (IFC) for vertical infrastructure. However, the lack of open data standards for the information exchange for horizontal infrastructure limits the adoption and effectiveness of integrated BIM. The paper outlines two interoperability issues for construction of rail infrastructure. The issues are presented in two case study reports, one from Australia and one from Malaysia. The each case study includes: a description of the project, the application of BIM in the project, a discussion of the promised BIM interoperability solution plus the identification of the unresolved lack of interoperability for horizontal infrastructure project management. The Moreton Bay Rail project in Australia introduces general software interoperability issues. The Light Rail Extension project in Kuala Lumpur outlines an example of the integration problems related to two different location data structures. The paper highlights how the continuing lack of data interoperability limits utilisation of integrated BIM for horizontal infrastructure rail projects.

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  • Construction management scheduling and control : the familiar historical overview.

    Behman, A.; Harfield, T.; Kenley, Russell (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper suggests that ‘management by exception’ is an historical default control mechanism based on the perception of control as a static process. However, increasingly scholars claim that a dynamic and proactive systems model is a more effective form of project control. These findings are the result of an historical desktop research method that analysed content from a small sample of scheduling methods and control approaches found in online and university library resources. The concept of control has historically influenced both visualization and analytics of different scheduling methods for construction project management. This paper focuses on two control ideals; static and dynamic control mechanisms. The overview begins with the description of early graphical scheduling techniques: Gantt charts and Harmonogram. It continues with examples of contributors to scheduling and control that include: CPM, PERT, LOB, Flowline and Location Based Management. The finding of this simple history suggests that change is the constant element for project control mechanisms. An object-based digital environment such as the data-rich building information modelling (BIM) appears to be continuing the change for new scheduling methods and control mechanisms.

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  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System For Live Spatialisation

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A; Norris, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

    White, BD; Rainier, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    While considerable effort goes into equipping undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and medicine with knowledge discovery skills and an understanding of the scientific literature, many of them complete their first degrees with a relatively basic level of competence. Undergraduate science education demands an intensive development of subject knowledge and technical skills with less emphasis on the primary literature, and unless an information literacy element is expressly built into science programmes undergraduate students are not routinely required to make use of library resources (Bogucka & Wood, 2009; Wiegant, Scager, & Boonstra, 2011). Postgraduate study, particularly at masters and doctoral level, places quite a different level of demand on students, and even to formulate a research question requires an extensive knowledge of the existing literature. The first part of the thesis journey is the literature review which provides a theoretical and methodological grounding of the whole project, but students often arrive at postgraduate study poorly equipped to perform this task (Hoffmann, Antwi-Nsiah, Feng, & Stanley, 2008; Miller, 2014). Those skills that they have acquired tend to be based around Google and Google Scholar (Wu & Chen, 2014) which provide a good result for relatively little effort, but which lack the functionality to fully support a literature review at this level (Johnson & Simonsen, 2015). Increasing internationalisation of postgraduate education is another factor impacting on this situation, although it would be wrong to assume that English-speaking students or those from “developed countries” possess the appropriate skills for an advanced degree literature review.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • tactile.motion: An iPad Based Performance Interface For Increased Expressivity In Diffusion Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Assessment Techniques For New Mechatronic Instruments as Applied to speaker.motion

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The field of mechatronic instrument design has developed substantially over the past decade. With these new instruments the common musical assessment techniques that are generally applied to western art music are no longer sufficient as the instrument builders need to assess the design and production of the mechatronic instrument itself as well as the way it might be used musically and expressively by composers and performers. This paper introduces ideas about the new approach to the assessment of mechatronic instruments that is needed to fully assess them. After introducing the new assessment technique principals and discussing why a holistic approach is needed in this particular field the authors then go on the provide a case study on the speaker.motion mechatronic loudspeaker system that has been assessed in the proposed way. The paper provides details on both a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the speaker.motion system and how the combination of the two studies is what allows a full assessment of the instrument, and of its expressive potential.

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  • Diffusing Diffusion: A History of the Technological Advances in Spatial Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Contingent interpretations : unreliable memories in stories of New Zealand architecture

    Turner, David (2017-07-11T00:08:29Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    While the relocation of buildings is not unknown in other building cultures, this paper suggests that the practice in New Zealand of wholesale rearrangement is an over-casual approach to history, and that such rearrangements affect a city’s narrative in time. Shifting buildings is a practice in the building culture that denies reliable record, toys with memory, and thus, one that requires our buildings to be treated as contingent interpretations. The presence of a building in a particular place is contingent, and dependent on externalities rather than on any commitment to notions of permanence. As an example the relocation in 1982 of Benjamin Mountfort’s first Anglican Cathedral in Auckland, can further be understood as a representation of a conflicted approach to permanence as a condition of urban architecture. For some, including the Historic Places Trust, St Mary’s removal was a pragmatic resolution of a self-evidently unsatisfactory arrangement, justified in a property-focused culture as a correction of its original location1. For others the removal was seen as an act of sacrilege that cut to the heart of traditions that inscribe buildings and Architecture with meaning by their association with place and time2. This perception translates the general characteristics of New Zealand building – of a short history, often disputed; of a cultural resistance to the recognition of obsolescence; of light-weight constructions that are tenuously fixed to the ground ; of a deeply conservative social order that commits the concept of ‘property’ to an extreme model of private ownership – which collectively suggest a profound attachment to temporary-ness. The practice creates a culture in which ‘place’ is uncertain, and in which the city as a representation of our built history lacks authenticity. This paper suggests that the tradition of treating buildings as a conditional property of history should be examined as a necessary part of a new discourse that develops more effective approaches to conservation. 1 Jane Bellamy. Quarter of a century since St Mary's move. East and Bays Courier, 7 March 2007; 8. 2 Nigel Wilson. St Mary's and the Cathedral. Auckland Metro, 1982; 2: 88-91.

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  • Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alleviate dietary saturated fat-induced postprandial rise in blood lipid levels.

    Dias, CB; Wood, LG; Phang, M; Garg, ML

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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