84 results for Conference paper, 2004

  • A history of avalanche accidents in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Irwin, D.; Owens, I. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is based on a study for the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council which investigated the circumstances contributing to the deaths of 128 people in avalanches between 1863 and 1999. The study identified a trend of high fatalities during European settlement followed by a lull in fatalities early last century and then an increase in recent decades similar to other recently colonized countries. Similar to other studies, most victims were in their twenties and shift from work-to recreation-based activities has occurred from a century ago to recent times. Comparison with other studies of more specific activities involved in recent decades showed that alpine climbing, people on training courses and in area skiers and patrollers were over-represented while out of area ski/boarders and snowmobilers were under-represented. The geographic distribution of fatalities is concentrated in the South Island reflecting the preponderance of terrain for climbing and skiing.

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  • The joy of the X: the design of an XML system

    Kennedy, D. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The two main uses of XML are data exchange and as a central source that can be extracted and displayed in multiple ways. This paper describes the design and development of an XML based system for course outlines that uses XML for data exchange and as a central repository. The central repository is constructed from a number of base XML documents that have been extracted from various disparate sources. The central repository is used to produce a range of different outputs in different formats. The design considerations, for the system, the schema and the XSL, are discussed.

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  • Where are they now? Making the transition - three years on

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    366 Where are they now? Making the Transition - Three Years On. Three years ago, the author presented a paper on a pilot project for senior high school students (McCarthy 2002) that provided a programme for transition to tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. As a result of this project, CPIT believed it had “captured” a potential market of students better prepared to handle the demands of tertiary study. Those students appeared better informed as to their options and more able to make informed choices and it was thought they might prove to be better equipped to survive in tertiary study. The initial project has since initiated a great deal of interest within other Technical Institutes both here in New Zealand and, at least one overseas institution, and has also spawned several successors, including a full-scale ICT-orientated senior high school – unique in New Zealand. This paper re-examines the pilot scheme, and its successors, and follows the relevant tertiary experiences of the students involved in the past three years.

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  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

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  • Teaching with a unit testing framework

    Lance, M. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper analyses element usage in a ‘real world’ XSLT application. A subset of core XSLT elements is identified and the reasons why these particular elements are useful is discussed. Teachers of XSLT may need to modify their introductory examples to cover what is actually needed in larger projects.

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  • Encouraging student retention: a study of student retention practices

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Tinto (2002) asks what would it mean for institutions to take student retention seriously? For CPIT, it took the harsh realities of budgeting EFTS for 2004. We had always seen it as an adult student problem – the students were adults: if they chose to leave it was their business. Now, at budget preparation time, when we saw the retention of our 2003 mid-year intake was 60%, we realised it wasn’t a student problem – it was our problem. We had found what it would mean to take student retention seriously.

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

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  • A virtual solution to a real problem: Vmware in the classroom

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years we have witnessed rapid advancements in ICT, which in turn has led, in the industry, to a staggering growth in the number and diversity of computer and networking solutions. As a result, academic institutions and professional training organizations face serious challenges in exposing students to many different computing environments while making efficient use of limited resources. To put it bluntly, how do we easily provide people with the practical experience of working with different operating systems, server applications, switches and routers? For a number of years, tutors at the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) have been using VMWare for the teaching of Microsoft, Linux, Netware and other operating systems as well as various associated technologies. The use of VMWare allows students to complete exercises, laboratory work and practical projects involving multiple servers in multiple networks without having to leave the physical confines of a single computer. While William McEwan (2002) documents the use of virtual machines, its origins and uses in the teaching of Unix and Linux courses, this paper extends this to other operating systems and moreover shifts the focus to the supporting infrastructure required in order to extract the maximum benefit from this virtualisation of machines, devices and storage media. This paper discusses one response to the dilemma of needing to expose students to a range of rapidly evolving computing technologies while ensuring that costs are kept low and that the supporting infrastructure is reliable, robust and not easily compromised in one way or another: in short, a solution that delivers to students and staff alike, a safe, scalable and flexible learning environment.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

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  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

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  • The use of boundary conditions for inductive models

    Whigham, Peter A (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    There is a large amount of interest in creating models from data using a variety of machine learning methods. Most of these approaches require a good distribution of observed values to produce reliable models. The use of background knowledge to augment the observed values has also been explored as a method to supplement the original feature set of training data. This paper argues that there is an additional set of data that can be created for many types of problems, based on the concept of boundary conditions. This boundary data incorporates an understanding of the modeled system behaviour under certain extreme values and therefore reduces the degrees of freedom within the inferred model. This paper argues that by using this information when training an inductive model a more robust generalization of the data can be achieved under some circumstances.

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  • The trustree for the visualisation of attribute and spatial uncertainty: usability assessments

    Kardos, Julian; Moore, Antoni; Benwell, George L (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Attribute and spatial uncertainty are defined and put into context for this research. This paper then extends on a research programme which has designed a visualisation of attribute and choropleth spatial uncertainty using the Hexagonal or Rhombus (HoR) hierarchical spatial data structure. Using the spatial data model in this fashion is termed – the trustree. To understand this progression, a brief explanation of this research programmes past history must be covered. The New Zealand 2001 census is used as an exemplarity dataset to express attribute uncertainty and choropleth boundary uncertainty (termed spatial uncertainty). An internet survey was conducted to test the usability of the trustree, which was used as a transparent tessellation overlay and a value-by-area (VBA) display within a population choropleth map. Two other visualisation of attribute uncertainty methods – blinking areas and adjacent value were also incorporated into the survey. Participants were required to rank, from 1 to 6, six grid cells which overlaid the uncertainty visualisations, in order from the most accurate to the most uncertain cell, respectively. These ranking results were correlated with the actual ranks, providing a metric of usability for each visualisation method. The blinking areas method was the most effective, followed by adjacent value, VBA trustree and the transparent HoR trustree. The time taken for a participant to rank each visualisation’s cells was collected – there is an 82% correlation between the time taken and the final usability results obtained.

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  • Digerud online GIS: developing an online community GIS resource in the Frogn municipal district of Norway

    Fritsvold, Tomas; Moore, Antoni; Chong, Albert K; Milosavljevic, Stephan (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    An increasing community demand for accurate, user friendly and easily accessible geographic information has lead to the development of online resources to aid in the decision making process (Craig et al, 2002, Green et al, 2002, Peng et al 2003). These resources such as interactive maps are often used as tools to plan and review imperative and non-imperative requirements of community life. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to access, retrieve and convert spatial data to an acceptable format for use in an Internet-accessible and community-based geographic information system (GIS) for the settlement of Digerud in Norway. An Internetbased GIS was placed on a university supplied public access server and known subjects with links to the Digerud district were approached and invited to participate in given geographic identification and measurement tasks on the Digerud GIS online applet. Following the completion of the measurement tasks the participants were surveyed in order to assess ease of use and asked to provide comments on their interaction with the program. The outcome of this study demonstrates the feasibility of such a system and that Digerud online GIS has the potential to develop as a tool for the people of the Digerud and neighbouring communities for use as either an imperative (e.g. socio-economic) or non-imperative (e.g. recreational) geographical information package.

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  • Analysis of distortions in a mental map using GPS and GIS

    Peake, Simon A J; Moore, Antoni (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Mental maps are a cartographic illustration of a person’s internal representation of the spatial environment in which they live. They are often used to provide an insight into how different ethnic or social groups perceive their environment. A new method of measuring the distortions present in mental maps is developed and tested using a global positioning system (GPS) and a geographic information system (GIS). Results suggest distortions are apparent the further away subjects travel from their familiar environment and that there are consistent scales at which mental maps operate.

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  • Wine tourism and the generation Y market: any possibilities?

    Treloar, Peter; Hall, C Michael; Mitchell, Richard (2004)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Changes in the operating environment for the wine industry in Australia and New Zealand have led to an increasing focus on wine tourism as a potential distribution method to grow a winery’s individual consumer base. Wine tourism is also seen as a strategy for encouraging growth in consumption amongst new markets. This research investigated the alcohol consumption behaviour of the Generation Y market to determine current purchasing behaviour, and their participation levels and interest in wine tourism. The aim of the research was to establish if potential for growth existed within the Generation Y market, and possible marketing strategies to increase levels of participation in wine consumption and wine tourism. To achieve this aim a survey was conducted of university students in Australia and New Zealand. The results showed that wine purchasing was limited within this group, as other alcohol such as beer and spirits were seen as easier and cheaper alternatives. However, the responses did show a potential for growth within this market. The research found that a large proportion of the respondents thought of wine tourism as an appealing tourism activity, and many had visited a winery. The results suggested that marketing which focuses on the leisure aspects of wine tourism, rather than highlighting the technical elements of a winery such as production and cellaring, would be most effective on this market. Furthermore, highlighting convenient travel methods and value for money was also found to be important, as the Generation Y markets financial situation was noted frequently as a limiting factor in wine purchase.

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  • Cubes, shadows and comic strips - a.k.a. interfaces, metaphors and maps?

    Moore, Antoni (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper explores the scope of three specific geovisualisation ideas. a) The Tangible Augmented Street Map (TASM): the use of a paper cube as a tangible augmented reality (AR) interface to a “book” of digital street maps. b) A Shadow Metaphor for Multi-temporal viewsheds: the use of differing transparencies to convey the consecutive viewsheds of points along a route. c) “Cartoography”: regarding the map as a caricature or cartoon of real world features; how far can we take this analogy? The map as comic strip is explored here. These potential areas of research encompass much of the current geovisualisation agenda, as introduced by MacEachren and Kraak (2001). These include interfaces (augmented reality), cognition (use of metaphors, and the assessment of interfaces) and representation (maps as caricatures, viewsheds).

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  • The 2003 New Zealand wineries’ survey

    Christensen, David; Hall, C Michael; Mitchell, Richard (2004)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    In 1997/98 a survey was conducted of New Zealand wineries with respect to their attitudes towards wine tourism and their relationship to key wine and food tourism stakeholders (Hall & Johnson, 1998). The survey was the first national level survey of the supply of the wine tourism product conducted in the world. The present paper presents the results of a slightly modified version of the previous national winery 1997/98 survey which was conducted in the May-July 2003. The paper highlights some preliminary results and conclusions derived from the survey results.

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  • Violent crumble: do buildings stand and systems tumble?

    Benwell, George L (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper introduces the notion that systems develop is not as bad as reported in the literature, but nonetheless there is some room for improvement. It sets out to enhance the outcomes of information systems development. The technique employed is to benchmark systems development against architecture. At first glance one may say that the two disciplines have nothing in common. This concern is shown to be false. In fact there arte many lessons to be learned from architecture.

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  • Irregular vector-agent based simulation for land-use modelling

    Hammam, Yasser; Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Freeman, Claire (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Urban structures exhibit complex patterns made of heterogeneous and irregular objects. Few works in the computational urban modelling literature have considered and examined the real geometric boundary of the city’s objects. However, most of these works are driven by Cellular Automata (CA) as a spatial modelling vehicle. This model has had success, but also has its limitations regarding the study of urban dynamics in computer simulation. Extensive modification of CA or use of a different modelling paradigm should be considered. We argue here that, representational realism must be achieved in urban complexity. This paper is an attempt to fill this gap to address the rigid structure of CA: we present a novel technique called the “vector-agent based simulation”, which uses discrete irregular objects as an autonomous spatial entity beneath an agent modelling structure. Through computer simulation, this new technique has been applied to von Thunen’s theory of agricultural land use as a hypothetical environment for model verification. The findings demonstrate that our proposal can be a new paradigm for urban simulation

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  • Biosecurity: a significant issue for wine tourism?

    Hall, C Michael (2004)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    People may be significant vectors for vine diseases and pests. Yet despite the potential biosecurity risks of visitation few New Zealand wineries have biosecurity strategies in place. The paper therefore aims to examine biosecurity threats to wineries in terms of first, visitor understanding of terms used in customs declaration and their relation to their perception of vineyards; and second, the behaviours of winery visitors. In order to undertake an exploratory assessment of biosecurity risks associated with wine tourism a short convenience survey was undertaken of winery visitors in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Central Otago wine regions of the South Island of New Zealand in January-March 2002. The survey had 324 respondents of which 69 were international visitors. The demographic profile of respondents was similar to previous profiles of New Zealand wine tourists. The results indicated that relatively few respondents recognised a vineyard as a farm therefore raising concerns about the extent to which present customs forms may identify winery or vineyard visits. Of equal concern was the extent to which the same clothing items are used from one winery visit to another, and on different trips. The paper concludes by noting the urgent need to develop more appropriate biosecurity strategies for wineries and vineyards in the light of the development of wine tourism.

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