113 results for Conference paper, 2005

  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

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  • Maths with attitude: an encouragement based approach

    Kennedy, D. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) approach to the teaching of an introductory, level 2 (where level 5 is equivalent to stage 1 university), mathematics course. It describes what has been done to address maths anxiety and poor attitudes to mathematics. An analysis of Maths Anxiety Scores (MAS) and Maths Self-Concept (MSC) scores is presented and compared with achievement. The results of interviews with students who have completed this course are also presented.

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  • Research cultures under the microscope: three case studies

    Joyce, D.; Bridgeman, N.; Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) offer computing degrees and are under pressure to grow their “research cultures” in order to maintain their degree accreditation. The three authors have experienced this pressure in different ways: as heads of department, programme directors and research co-ordinators. In this paper they attempt to answer five research questions: • what patterns of growth/decay have been observed at three institutions of different sizes? • how has the balance between publication and presentation changed? • how has the balance between national and international changed? • how has the balance between conferences and journals changed? • what are the possible reasons for the observed changes?

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  • eLearning initiative for education in ICT

    McCarthy, C.; Ross, J. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    CPIT has recently started offering the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT) (Level 5) in a blended delivery format to a small group of students under the Ministry of Education’s Digital Opportunities (DigiOPs) Community Technicians Project. This paper documents, reflects on and reviews the initial set-up, preparation and start-up of delivering the DipICT (Level 5) to a group of students located in remote rural areas throughout New Zealand. The results of this initial review, along with the two further stages of evaluative research, will help towards supporting the growth of flexible delivery methods that include eLearning and allow us to ensure effectiveness of such blends for future projects or instances of delivery.

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  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

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  • The workplace eLearner: Designing and delivering eLearning into the workplace

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, polytechnics and institutes of technology in New Zealand have had an extensive relationship with industry, business and the public sector employers in terms of placing students into internships, work experience, clinical placements and such like. Polytechnics are also able to secure relevant industry representatives on polytechnic programme advisory boards, for providing guidance with curriculum design and industry guidelines for applied qualifications. However, providing training and education in the workplace represents a very different situation. While polytechnics are seen as good providers of entry level workers that industry, business and the public sector can mould to their own particular culture and needs, in terms of providing training and education in the workplace, polytechnics are seen by some as inflexible, too expensive, unresponsive and not really equipped to develop and deliver programmes that are tailored to the client’s specific needs. Web-based technology enabled learning offers the potential for the New Zealand’s polytechnic sector to address many of the problems they have faced in delivering cost effective training and education into the workplace. It also has the possibility to deal with the perceived weaknesses of traditional methods of workplace-based training and instruction. While computer-based training offers the advantages of self-paced learning and skills training, the real value in a workplace learning environment is the ability to capture and leverage the knowledge, expertise and skills already present in the learners. This paper presents a case study of how a consortium of polytechnics have undertaken two related eLearning projects which deliver a national management qualification to current and aspiring supervisory personnel in the New Zealand public sector.

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  • Beginning a conversation: writing a history about Mangaia

    Reilly, Michael (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Imagine the following scene: Rarotonga International Airport, the date 26 April 1988. A young Pacific historian is standing in front of a weighing machine at the domestic check in. About to place his bags on the tray, he is told that the counter staff must first weigh him. Has he heard right? But they insist and reluctantly, in front of the other passengers, his weight is carefully recorded, before his bags are checked through. The plane is finally called, and being impatient to be off he is the first passenger to arrive at the plane. But he is told off to the side by the crew, so that two students from the local theological college can enter first. Finally, after the other passengers board, he is allowed on. Forty minutes in a small two engined turbo prop high above the dark blue green sea of the Pacific, and he cannot see an island in sight. Then as the plane banks, there to the right a solid triangle of land suddenly emerges on the horizon, its coastline lapped by the rolling waves of the ocean. As the plane descends the young Pacific historian looks out of the window at the land. This is the island of Mangaia, famed amongst Pacific scholars for the learned ethnographies written about it since the nineteenth century. But the island fails to impress the historian: the land seems to comprise barren grey rocks rising up from the seas; there are no sandy inviting beaches, no coconut trees bathed by the waters in the lagoon, not even a sign of life, no habitations, no houses, nothing. Just bush and rock. Amongst the anxieties of arrival, he also experiences disappointment: the land seems desolate and forbidding.

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  • Poia atu / mai (?) taku poi – The Polynesian Origins of Poi

    Paringatai, Karyn (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Poi is recognised around the world as a performance item unique to Māori. The word poi refers to a Māori dance or game performed with a ball-like object, to which a cord of varying length is attached. Poi refers to both the ball and the dance, which normally includes hitting and swinging the ball on its string, usually accompanied by music or a chant of some kind. One of New Zealand’s most renowned anthropologists, Sir Peter Buck, who was an authoritative figure spearheading the research into the material culture of the Māori, states that “the women’s poi dance … used an accessory in the form of the poi ball which is unique for Polynesia.” This is a common view of poi. However, this paper questions the uniqueness of poi to the Māori people by showing that the origins of poi can be found in other regions of Polynesia. Specifically, it will trace the movement of poi from Western to Eastern Polynesia; the same path taken by Māori during their migration to New Zealand. It will look at ball games from islands throughout Polynesia with forms and functions similar to those of poi to demonstrate the evolution of poi towards its use in Māori society. Poia atu taku poi, wania atu taku poi (swing far my poi, skim onward my poi) are the age-old words used figuratively in poi compositions to send the poi on a journey over the land and its people; visiting mountains, rivers, forests, villages, whānau (families), hapü (sub-tribes), and iwi (tribes). The words demonstrate the importance of the connections a composer of poi compositions has with each of the above entities. Using this saying I pose the question: Poia atu taku poi? Poia mai taku poi? Did Māori send the poi to the world or was the poi sent to them?

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  • Pacific Island women, body image and sport

    Schaaf, Michelle R (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This article analyses the representation of Pacific women from an Orientalist theoretical framework. The analysis traces prominent representations of Pacific women within early colonial and Christian discourses, and dominant representations since colonisation. Included in this analysis is a discussion of the fantasy of Western men, that is, of the ‘easy’ Pacific women. One of the central arguments of this article is that the reality of the ideal Pacific female body-shape from a Pacific perspective is not only in stark contrast to the Western ideal, but is also in variance with the imagined erotic archetype of Western men. To locate this analysis within the contemporary diasporic milieu, case-studies of Pacific women in the sport of netball will be used to determine the impact of Orientalist-like representations of body-shape and erotic fantasy on Pacific women now residing in New Zealand, and to highlight the differences between the Pacific and Western body-shape ideals.

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  • He Kura Māori, he Kura Hāhi

    Matthews, Nathan (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Church initiated and operated Māori secondary boarding schools have existed in Aotearoa in various forms since the arrival of the missionaries in the early 19th century. Unfortunately, these schools have contributed to the colonization process, as they have in many other parts of the world, accelerating assimilation of the Indigenous people and the rapid decline of the Indigenous language, in this case, te reo Māori (Māori language). One of the Church boarding schools primary roles in Aotearoa is to act as a vehicle for the proliferation of Christian beliefs. As a result many educationalists have proposed that the “civilizing” intentions of the missionaries was to colonise Māori children. However, I propose that the amalgamation of both the Church schools and Māori communities created a hybrid of Māori culture; a Māori Catholic culture. As a result I propose that these schools, since their inception, have contributed significantly to the development of Māori society, particularly in the production of dynamic Māori leaders who have had a compelling influence on their Māori communities and Māori society and in some instances on the nation state. Therefore, this paper will examine the development of Māori leadership within the Church secondary boarding schools. It will discuss the way in which these schools have, or have not, responded to the constantly changing social and political conditions, in which they exist. The ability to respond to these changes determines the type of leadership that is produced and how effective it is. Hato Paora College, a Catholic Māori boy’s school in Feilding, will be used as an example of this type of schooling. The way in which it has attempted to adapt to meet the social, educational and cultural needs, of its students and their communities in producing effective Māori leaders will be reviewed.

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  • Parallel processes and situation awareness display design

    Moyle, Sam A (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    In recent years there has been trend away from single sensor/single (SS/SI) indicator boards as the means by which overall understanding of current work-flow is expressed. Rather, computer screen based Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are being modified to meet this need. This paper discusses a continuing experiment that compares existing SCADA design elements and those with simple display modification; display changes that facilitate decision making by improving overall Situation Awareness (SA).

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  • Fixation of neutral alleles in spatially structured populations via genetic Drift: Describing the spatial structure of faster-than-panmictic configurations

    Whigham, Peter A; Dick, Grant (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper considers spatially-structured populations described as a network, and examines the properties of these networks in terms of their affect on fixation of neutral alleles due solely to genetic drift. Individuals are modelled as two allele, one locus haploid, diploid and tetraploid structures. The time to fixation for a variety of network configurations is discovered through simulation. The concept of hyperfixation is introduced, which refers to when time to fixation for a network of n nodes occurs more rapidly than the corresponding panmictic n node structure. A hyperfixation index, h, is developed that attempts to characterise a spatial arrangement such that when h < 1 hyperfixation will occur. Issues regarding fixation with ploidy independence, and possible improvements to the described hyperfixation index are discussed.

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  • Model-based cartographic generalisation with uncertainty

    Moore, Antoni (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The aim of this paper is to outline a proposed project to holistically generalise spatial data using agents. Cartographic generalisation is a process that is fraught with uncertainty – for a particular spatial scale there are an infinite amount of combinations for the display (or non-display) of data in the map space. Each map element (e.g. objects such as roads or buildings can be map elements) is an agent, with the ability to self-diagnose for cartographic conflict and reason with uncertainty (using Dempster-Shafer theory) to choose how to display itself in conjunction with neighbouring objects. Synoptically, a legible map will have been created through the intelligent interaction of agents at the local scale. This paper will explore issues associated with the above process.

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  • Methods for creating scale-free networks without resorting to global knowledge

    Aldridge, Colin H (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper is a progress report on investigations into methods for evolving scalefree networks using less-than-global knowledge of network characteristics. The motivation for this work is the reliance on global knowledge by the now wellknown Albert-Barabási algorithm for evolving fat-tailed networks exhibiting powerlaw node degree distributions. This paper examines three approaches, namely tournament selection, a deterministic walk, and a stochastic walk. These methods yield fat-tailed node degree distributions to a greater or lesser extent, but not "classic" power-law distributions. The investigation is on-going.

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  • Discovering population structures with extreme fixation rates via evolutionary search

    Dick, Grant; Whigham, Peter A (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Genetic drift is a well known and important force in directing the evolution of a population. The nature of genetic drift in panmictic populations is well understood, and new research is shedding light on the behaviour of genetic drift. This paper explores the concept of using evolutionary algorithms to search for population structures that exhibit the minimum and maximum conditions for loss of variation via genetic drift. Two spatial structures repeatedly emerge as candidates: a star topology that reduces fixation time to a logarithm of population size, and a “line with islands” topology that can delay fixation via genetic drift to a greater extent than any previously known population structure.

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  • How interesting is this? Finding interest hotspots and ranking images using an MPEG-7 visual attention model

    Wolf, Heiko; Deng, Da (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    A lively Dunedin street scene, and a panoramic view of the Southern Alps - two images that might appeal and interest a viewer. But where do people look, and which of those images appears more interesting? In this paper, we are introducing a visual attention model based on MPEG-7 descriptors that creates multi-scale feature maps to detect interest hotspots in images. Further, we are assessing three methods that use attention models for image ranking and compare them to results gathered in a user test. Preliminary results indicate that rankings created by our model show a high agreement with rankings obtained in a pilot user study.

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  • Customer Orientation in E-government: The Managers’ Perspectives

    Hannah, Polson; Theivananthampillai, Paul (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    With the increasing focus on technology, the demand for the electronic provision of services is growing. Public sector organisations are beginning to consider whether they too should integrate technology into their operations, specifically with projects such as websites, intranets or systems for communication. This study aims to consider whether the implentation of e-government in a local public sector organisation has enabled this organisation to achieve their customer orientation in order to realise improved levels of performance. This study provides a number of useful insights. Firstly all managers appear to understand the customer orientation of the organisation and thus the importance of a focus on the customer. There seems to be a difficulty however of implementing this customer orientation in practice. The lack of effective customer measures means managers tend to focus on internal measures. While managers perceive there to be a number of potential benefits, the majority of these tend to be related to efficiency and the achievement of outputs. For departments with low customer orientation there is not likely to be a strong link between outputs and outcomes therefore there is a potential danger that technology will divert their attention away from the customer. While e-government may result in achievement of output objectives this are not necessarily conducive to achieving the organisations overall mission. In summary, the results of this study imply that despite the orientatation-performance link, e- government can provide benefits. These however are more likely to be related to operational efficienicy at low levels of customer orientation. In other cases, what gets measured is what gets done. For the real potential of e-government to be realised there must be a strong alignment of customer orientation and e-government. Managers must be clear as to what the overall mission is and how e-government can assist them in achieving this.

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  • Tracing the impacts of global sourcing on local communities: a historical analysis of employment relations in Queensland’s beef processing sector

    Insch, Andrea (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    By focusing on firm-specific drivers the literature on global sourcing overlooks many of the wider impacts on host communities. In particular, impacts on the dynamic employment relationship have consequences for local governments and workers as well as MNEs engaged in global sourcing. Using historical methods this paper analyses the development of Queensland’s beef processing sector to identify patterns in global sourcing behaviour and the impacts on employment relations in local communities. The evidence reveals a pattern of inward FDI motivated by MNEs’ resource seeking objectives encouraged by government incentives. Whereas early global sourcing practices were sporadic they became more strategic. Cost minimisation was the enduring driver of this MNE activity. This ethos tempered relations between meat workers and employers and limited the direct and indirect benefits associated with job creation in Queensland’s regional host communities.

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  • Measuring spatial accessibility to primary health care

    Bagheri, Nasser; Benwell, George L; Holt, Alec (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The aim of this paper is to explain a new approach for calculating spatial accessibility to primary health care (PHC) services. New Zealand and World Health Organisation (WHO) rules were used to determine acceptable levels of minimum travel time and distance to the closest PHC facilities via a road network. This analysis was applied to 2369 census areas in the 2001 census release with an average population of 76 people and 32 PHC services inside the Otago region. The best route (shortest time) from residential areas to PHC facilities was calculated using the mean centre of population distribution within each meshblock polygon instead of using simple geometric centroids of the Meshblocks. This study has shown that the central and northern parts of the Otago region have some areas with low accessibility levels to PHC.

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  • Generic vector-agents

    Hammam, Yasser; Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Freeman, Claire (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The work reported here has been motivated by the need for a generic spatial model to overcome the limitations of Cellular Automata (CA) regarding the rigid square-cell structure and limited neighbourhood configurations. A novel approach for spatial modelling technique is developed: the “vector-agent” in which the individual entity is represented by their real geometric boundaries (which can change over time) beneath an agent modelling structure. We show in this paper how the theory behind CA and agents can be combined to produce a generic and dynamic agent based on the vector data structure. This new paradigm has extended capabilities over the Geographic Automata (Torrens and Benenson, 2005) in terms of CA disunity and the abstraction of non-fixed-objects. Through computer simulation, different techniques and algorithms have been derived achieving a high degree of representational realism for a variety of phenomena

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