107 results for Conference paper, 2006

  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

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  • Falling into trade:- apprentices' perceptions of becoming a baker

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is a report on the initial data analysis of a larger study on how apprentices become bakers. The overall objective of this study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This interim report is based on interviews with first year apprentices. The apprentices interviewed were all between 17 to 18 years of age. The majority of these apprentices left school in year 11 or 12 (equivalent to Australian years 10 and 11) with minimal National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) credits. Perhaps surprisingly, none of these apprentices had initial ambitions to become bakers. However, interestingly, they had all undertaken work experience in bakeries while at school. At the time of the interviews, they were well into their first year of working in a bakery. Therefore, this report provides a snapshot view of how these apprentices have settled into the baking life and their progress through the beginning stages of becoming bakers.

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  • The first time eLearner's journey: an examination of attrition and withdrawal issues in workplace-based eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the extent of the problem, or a clear understanding of what direct factors contribute to learners dropping out of eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. It also argues that undertaking an eLearning course for the first time can be experienced as daunting and overwhelming for the mature adult learner. The learner’s initial experience of confronting simultaneous, multiple learning tasks at the start of an eLearning course can contribute to an overloading of a learner’s cognitive processing ability and is one possible reason for the high levels of drop outs from an online course within the first few weeks of the course start. This paper draws on experience in the development and delivery of online management training courses to employees in the New Zealand public sector. The experience is used to develop a conceptual model of the learning journey experienced by a first-time eLearner at the start of an online course. Conclusions are drawn as to the likely factors leading to learner withdrawal, and the type, and timing of support to enhance learner retention, engagement and achievement.

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  • Gimme shelter: Tsunami mitigation as part of a permanent shelter programme for Aceh, north Sumatra

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The resulting housing solutions developed for permanent shelter as part of aid packages and reconstruction often belie the complexity of their resolution. This paper briefly outlines the often hidden subtleties in such designs and in particular the complexity that “mitigation” can require. Mitigation is the accepted “notion” that any reconstruction should address former issues by reducing those perceived problems and issues. The hope is that they can be completed eliminated so that the disaster does not happen again. This may not always be achievable. The development of a permanent shelter reconstruction program for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for tsunami victims on the west Coast of Aceh, North Sumatra is documented. And in this program the obvious mitigation need was for “tsunami proofing” of housing. Drawing on the tsunami report by Wilkinson, the paper highlights the process, design and planning considered as part of this mitigation and the practicalities of “balancing” the wishes of people to return home to sites ravaged by the tsunami against the responsibility to ensure “safe” housing (Wilkinson, 2005). The starkness of the engineering “numbers” against the social costs is compelling and the paper highlights in practical terms the difficulties sometimes faced to reduce and thus “mitigate”.

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  • Measuring the qualitative aspects of a reconstruction programme: Aceh, Indonesia

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Aid Agencies are accountable for the funds that they administer and consequently there is a reporting requirement to demonstrate that any intervention (such as a permanent housing program) is beneficial to those that the Agency seeks to assist. The WHO Quality of Life Tool (WHO QLT) is one such measure of well being and has been extensively used since it was developed in 1996 (predominantly in the health sector). However, it does requires a before and after study to produce results. This is not necessarily problematic but the paper reports on the application of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Survey tool that consists of 42 questions (hence its name DASS42) as part of a shelter program for the West Coast of Aceh following the December 2004 tsunami. The advantage of the DASS42 is that it can quantify results based on one survey (Lovibond, 1995). The DASS42 was developed at the University of New South Wales, Australia and while it enjoys wide acceptance this was the first time it was applied to a shelter program. The results from the DASS42 can be used to prioritise beneficiaries and when combined with the Disaster Life Continuum Model (rather than a 4 R Model) provides insights into the psycho-social status of beneficiaries. The paper outlines how the DASS42 was used to quantify the impact of the tsunami disaster in terms of gender, age and resilience of the Acehnese people. The survey was completed by 600 respondents at 5 different locations along the West Coast during the first two weeks of March 2005, less than 3 months after the tsunami.

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  • Leadership learning: The praxis of dilemma management

    Cardno, Carol (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    No abstract available yet

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  • Factors associated with the recovery of housing prices in Hong Kong

    Ge, X .J.; Poon, K. M.; Boon, John (2006-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In the period 1999 – 2004 housing prices in Hong Kong sunk to a low point in mid 2003 and then rose again. This paper investigates which factors are associated with those price movements. The paper starts by reviewing literature on housing prices including both price determinants and research methodology. Data published by the Hong Kong Government is used for the study. The housing price variables are grouped together as macro economic factors, demographic factors, housing related factors and housing supply factors. The 2-Stage Least Square (2SLS) Method of regression analysis is used in order to reduce the bi-direction effects between dependent and independent variables. Results show that economic conditions are the most important external influencers of housing prices. The model developed can be used to predict the trend of housing prices.

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  • Fostering moral courage: What do business students learn about professional ethics in cooperative education placements?

    Ayling, Diana (2006-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper examines recent literature and research into business students’ experiences in cooperative education placements with a view to exploring their experiences and learning of professional ethics. In recent times, the business world has been rocked by scandals such as Enron, WorldCom and Parmalat. At the heart of these business collapses is the realization that the business world has fallen short in terms of professional and business ethics. As cooperative education students enter the workforce for the first time, they have the opportunity to learn from their colleagues’ and mentors’ attitudes and behaviors that will influence them for a life time. These may be positive strong attitudes to ethical behavior and practice or poor attitudes and questionable practices. This examination of the recent literature and research will serve as a foundation for a small research project into students learning and experiences of professional ethics in their cooperative education placements.

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  • Combined sewer overflow forecasting with feed-forward back-propagation artificial neural network

    Fernando, Achela; Zhang, Xiujuan; Kinley, Peter F. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A feed-forward, back-propagation Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model has been used to forecast the occurrences of wastewater overflows in a combined sewerage reticulation system. This approach was tested to evaluate its applicability as a method alternative to the common practice of developing a complete conceptual, mathematical hydrological-hydraulic model for the sewerage system to enable such forecasts. The ANN approach obviates the need for a-priori understanding and representation of the underlying hydrological hydraulic phenomena in mathematical terms but enables learning the characteristics of a sewer overflow from the historical data. The performance of the standard feed-forward, back-propagation of error algorithm was enhanced by a modified data normalizing technique that enabled the ANN model to extrapolate into the territory that was unseen by the training data. The algorithm and the data normalizing method are presented along with the ANN model output results that indicate a good accuracy in the forecasted sewer overflow rates. However, it was revealed that the accurate forecasting of the overflow rates are heavily dependent on the availability of a real-time flow monitoring at the overflow structure to provide antecedent flow rate data. The ability of the ANN to forecast the overflow rates without the antecedent flow rates (as is the case with traditional conceptual reticulation models) was found to be quite poor.

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  • The Pope, the Prophet and the Internet

    Cass, Philip (2006-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In the past 12 months, the media has reported on two major religious stories; the furore over the Danish cartoons and Pope Benedict XVI's speech at Regensburg. Both were instances of what were relatively small incidents blown into global problems by the media and what we might call the anti-media of the internet. Although the stories originated in Europe and the majority of protests originated in the Middle East, their effect was felt as far afield as the Pacific. The way in which the stories were reported in western and Middle Eastern media demonstrated, on the one hand, an almost complete incomprehension by European media of Muslim outrage at the cartoons and, in the Middle East, an equal incomprehension of what the Pope had actually said. Both stories reflected poorly on the media's ability to report accurately and objectively on religious matters. In an age when religion rather than politics is the driving force behind so much of what is happening, and especially at a time when the internet allows so much unmediated and uncontextualised material to influence people's thinking, this is extraordinarily dangerous.

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  • Auckland WaterPark

    Bradbury, Matthew (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Like many waterfront cities in the world, Auckland is experiencing the slow but sure transformation of a heavily industrialised and polluted harbour into a lifestyle zone of apartments and marinas. This paper discusses and illustrates an urban design investigation of the Auckland Waterfront. The paper reconsiders the conventional master plan approach to waterfront projects in favour of a graduated development strategy based on an acknowledgment of Auckland own landscape particularities. The paper begins with a description of the history of the Auckland waterfront, a description of the present day configuration, and a discussion of contemporary issues. The paper moves on to describe the author’s design proposal. An incremental, phased strategy is suggested. The design project starts by mapping the landscape conditions of the Auckland waterfront. These conditions then intersect with a series of environmental infrastructure measures. Firstly, the collection and disposal of dangerous and toxic fill, found in both contaminated waterfront sites and the adjacent seabed. Secondly, the provision of a series of remediation zones to actively clean and filter polluted storm water before discharging into the harbour. Utilising the time frames of the native ecology, the waterfront is gradually transformed into a network of localized ecotones. Opportunities for an active social engagement with these new sites and their newly formed connection to city and harbour are revealed and exploited. A cultural infrastructure is gradually inserted into this social and landscape network. Of course the unavoidable accouchements of ‘waterfront city’ cannot be denied but there location can create unfamiliar but potentially rewarding juxtapositions with the new landscape. A case study of the Queens Wharf is developed in detail to reveal how the initial mapping and environmental remediation strategies can be developed through an engagement with the techniques of garden making. In this case study, garden making is used as an instrumental, directive force to act on the newly discovered landscape conditions. Gradually a unique urbanism is developed which eschews the traditional urbanism of Europe and North America. Moving beyond the limitations of the traditional fixed master plan, the Auckland WaterPark project demonstrates a fluid and moving development strategy, which acknowledges the time of both landscape and city.

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  • Implementing consumer health research: Empirical results leading to social innovation in New Zealand

    Nel, Pieter; Hansen, Jens J.; Boyd, Mary-Anne (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Health research is often regarded as fragmented, competitive and highly specialized. However, there is often little effective communication and consultation between producers of health research and end users. Given this, a Consumer Participation and Community Engagement Framework was adopted by the Waitemata District Health Board. Local research also indicated that consumer and provider perspectives create opportunities for innovation and new co-developed knowledge. Accordingly, a mentored group was established. A long term outcome has been promoting sustainable and effective co-design for better health. Thus an innovative programme was established to co-create capacity building for consumers and professionals alike.

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  • Polynesians in Auckland

    Austin, Michael (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper compares some recent films set in the contested terrains of Auckland - sometimes called the biggest Polynesian city. The film Once Were Warriors depicts the violence and despair of Maori life in the outer suburbs. Two more recent films (No 2 and Sione's Wedding) focus on Pacific Island immigrants and introduce a new complexity into the usual discussion of settler versus indigenous, or brown versus white. It is possible to see these films as a reading of the occupation of the house and suburb through Pacific Island eyes, and this is contrasted with the depiction of housing in the Pacific Island Design Guide - a Government publication. There is, in the films, a certain acceptance and right of occupation of the fabric of the city which exposes the European norms that have shaped it.

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  • Polynesian housing in Auckland

    Austin, Michael (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Auckland is sometimes called the world's biggest Polynesian city but Polynesians occupy only some of the suburbs. The original Ngati Whatua inhabitants have been swamped, not only by the European (Pakeha) settlers, but also over the last half century by Maori groups from other parts of New Zealand. To add a further complexity there are large numbers of immigrants from other Pacific Islands ....

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  • Temperate Modernity: The Whangarei architecture of Alfred Morgan in the 1930s

    Francis, Kerry (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper stems from my interest in how the ideas and forms of international modernism are translated to a local architectural context. In 2003 I was teaching the history of modernism to students studying for the National Diploma of Architectural Technology (NDAT) at Northland Polytechnic in Whangarei and looking for ways to engage these students who are in the main not academic. I gave them a project to research, record and present the dates of construction and names of the architects of the buildings in the main streets of Whangarei City. These records provided material that allowed us to discuss, with reference to a local context, the ideas and forms that were generated in other parts of the world. Their research highlighted the significant number of buildings in the central city area that had been designed by Alfred Morgan and more importantly that these buildings seemed to show a move from the Georgian roots of the earlier buildings towards a language of international modernism. This paper examines several 1930s Morgan designed buildings in Whangarei with emphasis on the Public Library, the Ayling Building and J.W.Court’s Building and uses these existing buildings and newspaper and magazine articles to illustrate this shift. It also outlines Morgan’s professional relationship with Horace Massey who was the associated architect on the Library project.

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  • Competition for IBL Placements

    Ram, Shiu (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Providers of tertiary education and training include work experience or real projects as compulsory requirements of a number of programs that they offer. Students have to meet either one of these requirements in order to graduate. This implies that the students must find employers who can provide opportunities for them to gain the necessary work experience or complete projects that are relevant to their respective programs of study. Are there such employers? If so, can they meet the demand for the industry based learning (IBL) placements? How should the placements be managed? Obviously there are employers who do offer opportunities for IBL placements because many students have successfully completed the requirements of their programs and have graduated. However, did all students find placements that they needed? Did they find them in good time? The reality is that the number of opportunities for placements is limited. Students from all tertiary institutions compete for the places that are available. The situation is probably aggravated by secondary school students who also take up holiday jobs. Apparently, there is a need for an efficient and effective management of the placements. An electronic database that stores employer information is an obvious solution, but who should create and maintain it? Should each institution have one of their own? Should there be one for each city, or the nation as whole or a global one? Answers to these questions may lead to well-managed IBL placements. The issues raised in the above paragraphs are based on my observation over the last three and a half years while supervising IBL students on Unitec’s Bachelor of Business program of study with the information systems major. These may also be relevant to industries other than information technology (IT). The intention of this paper is to find some feasible solutions to these apparent problems by delving deeper into the issues that have been raised. This paper may also trigger the undertaking of new and more detailed studies that could lead to effective solutions.

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  • A Collaborative Constraint-based Intelligent System for Learning Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML

    Baghaei, Nilufar (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Automatic analysis of interaction and support for group learning through a distance collaborative learning system is at the forefront of educational technology. Research shows that collaborative leaming provides an environment to enrich the leaming process by introducing interactive partners into an educational system and creating more realistic social contexts. This paper presents COtttCl-Ogtll, a constraint-based ITS that teaches object-oriented design using Unified Modelling Language (UML). UML is easily the most popular objectoriented modelling technology in current practice. Constraint-Based Modelling (CBM) has been used successfully in several tutoring systems, which have proven to be extremely effective in evaluations performed in real classrooms. We have developed a single-user version that supports students in learning UML class diagrams. The system was evaluated in a real classroom, and the results showed that students' performance increased significantly while interacting with the system. We are now extending the system to provide supporl for collaboration. An overview of both single-user and collaborative versions of the system is presented. A full evaluation study has been planned lor April 2006, the goal of which is to evaluate the effect of using the system on students' leaming and collaboration.

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  • Falling into trade:- apprentices' perceptions of becoming a baker

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is a report on the initial data analysis of a larger study on how apprentices become bakers. The overall objective of this study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This interim report is based on interviews with first year apprentices. The apprentices interviewed were all between 17 to 18 years of age. The majority of these apprentices left school in year 11 or 12 (equivalent to Australian years 10 and 11) with minimal National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) credits. Perhaps surprisingly, none of these apprentices had initial ambitions to become bakers. However, interestingly, they had all undertaken work experience in bakeries while at school. At the time of the interviews, they were well into their first year of working in a bakery. Therefore, this report provides a snapshot view of how these apprentices have settled into the baking life and their progress through the beginning stages of becoming bakers.

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  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

    View record details
  • The first time eLearner's journey: an examination of attrition and withdrawal issues in workplace-based eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the extent of the problem, or a clear understanding of what direct factors contribute to learners dropping out of eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. It also argues that undertaking an eLearning course for the first time can be experienced as daunting and overwhelming for the mature adult learner. The learner’s initial experience of confronting simultaneous, multiple learning tasks at the start of an eLearning course can contribute to an overloading of a learner’s cognitive processing ability and is one possible reason for the high levels of drop outs from an online course within the first few weeks of the course start. This paper draws on experience in the development and delivery of online management training courses to employees in the New Zealand public sector. The experience is used to develop a conceptual model of the learning journey experienced by a first-time eLearner at the start of an online course. Conclusions are drawn as to the likely factors leading to learner withdrawal, and the type, and timing of support to enhance learner retention, engagement and achievement.

    View record details