96 results for Conference paper, 2007

  • mLearning and the workplace learner: Integrating mLearning ePortfolios with Moodle

    Chan, S.; Ford., N. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on trials undertaken at CPIT to set up a support system for workplace based learning. A mlearning programme involves the use of a text messaging to disseminate summative and formative assessments. The use of mobile phones to take photos, videos, audio and text evidence of workplace skills being acquired to compile an eportfolio are also part of the trials. Evidence will be stored on Web 2.0 applications / personal portals and accessed by students via a course site set up using the content management system, Moodle.

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  • How does enterpreneurship within rural tourism diversify rural ecomonies - Banks Peninsula - New Zealand?

    Cloesen, U. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Rural tourism is considered an economic alternative for farmers who are facing sinking profits and require additional income. This in turn can lead to an entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurship takes place when seperate legal entities for new ventures are formed. Entrepreneurship is commonly defined as creating something of value from practically nothing (Timmons in Morrison et. al., 1999, p.10). It is the process of creating or seizing an opportunity, and pursuing it regardless of the resources currently personally controlled. this involves the definition, creation and distribution of value and benefits to individuals, groups, organisations and society at large. One example for this is the establishment of the first private rural walkway in New Zealand on Banks Penninsula.

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  • Becoming a baker:- from 'hopeful reactor' to' passion honer'

    Chan, S. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper focuses on emergent themes from interviews with young apprentice bakers. It is part of a larger study of how young people become bakers. The overall objective of the main study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This paper reports on interviews carried out with second year apprentices. It reveals that the majority of the apprentices in the study, who had taken on an apprentice due to lack of other choices, are gaining confidence in their abilities. This confidence is shown in their building passion for the trade and their growing commitment towards becoming bakers.

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  • eLearning deployment: knowing your context

    Martin, A.; Nesbit, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines concepts from the Knowledge Management (KM) domain and looks at how they can be applied in an eLearning setting. Particular attention is paid to the notion of context as it is defined in the KM body of literature and how it was applied in the development of eLearning content for courses from the Certificate in Computing (CIC).

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  • Analysis of results in simulation and modeling of CDMA systems

    Kolahi, Samad (2007-07-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, using discrete event stochastic simulation by batch-means, new results have been obtained by analysing the sensitivity of CDMA blocking probability for a given traffic load against various number of calls per batch and confidence intervals. It is found that for the system under study one long simulation with one million call arrivals produce approximately 99% confidence in results while it needs 100,000 calls to achieve 95% confidence. For system under study and with 27 Erlang of traffic, the blocking probability is 0.0202 with 99% confidence and 0.0192 with 95% confidence. The impact of warm-up period on CDMA simulation is discussed. Situation with three tiers of neighbouring cells are considered when mobile compares three base stations and chooses the base station with the strongest signal.

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  • Whakawhanaungatanga in praxis: Transforming early childhood practice in Aotearoa through honouring indigineity

    Ritchie, Jenny (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

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  • Landscape systems modelling: A disturbance ecology approach

    Margetts, Jacqueline; Barnett, Rod; Popov, Nikolay (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper reports on research which explores the modelling of landscape systems over time using multiagent simulation (MAS) software called NetLogo. Two case studies investigate a disturbance ecology approach to the recovery of Pacific Island settlements after cyclonic events. First, the natural tropical forest sequence of colonisation-succession-disturbance which operates on Pacific Islands subject to frequent cyclonic events is modelled according to the rules of forest recovery. Then, rules derived from the tropical forest model are applied to a Pacific resort to explore design possibilities as the resort responds to cyclonic disturbance. There are two useful outcomes: the possible impact of a cyclone on a resort is modelled, and new patterns of resort design emerge. The research shows that MAS can not only model natural landscape systems but also be used to explore an infinite number of ‘what-if’ design scenarios. The results show the potential for MAS in landscape architectural practice.

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  • Integration of design and technology

    Austin, Michael (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Certification Boards visiting architecture schools regularly demand more ‘technology’ in the curriculum, and an increased ‘integration’ of design and technology in the teaching programme. The persistence of this over many years, despite substantial changes in what is meant by technology, suggests that it is not easily achieved, or by any means a straightforward matter. Their reference is to building technology which now needs to be distinguished from information technology where students are often more competent than their elders. Building technology is seldom theorised (with a few notable exceptions) by either design theorists or those who teach technology. Even so called hi-tech architecture (which uses marine technology aesthetically rather than technically) is not theorised. It is sometimes assumed that everything taught in an architecture school should be useful or necessary for a competent architect. Each subject claims this status, but this essential knowledge already crowds the curriculum. The level of understanding demonstrated by the students nevertheless appears to be minimal when compared with their precocious design abilities. It is proposed that integration with design of half-understood technologies is too much to ask of any student during, or even after, five years of study. This paper starts to unravel some aspects of the teaching of technology and discusses issues around the notion of integration.

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  • Aiming high: Can the New Zealand Diploma in Business create the graduates it desires?

    Ayling, Diana (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The new NZDipBus is an interesting national qualification. Owned by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA), it is not a unit standard based qualification, such as the National Diploma in Business nor is it grounded in any higher education provider as are business degrees. It is a stand alone qualification, not aligned to any specific institution or educational strategy. The graduate profile was developed by NZQA in an extensive and careful consultation process. Over the last two years NZQA, in conjunction with business representatives and academics, has developed a new version (Version 2) of the highly successful NZDipBus. This development process was in response to requests for curriculum update from higher education providers, the business community, the National Advisory Committee for Business Studies of the Institutes of Technology and the Polytechnics of New Zealand (ITPNZ) forum. The aim of this paper is firstly to explore whether the graduate profile is appropriate for developing business graduates for the 21st century and secondly to evaluate whether the graduate profile is embedded into the curricula to ensure it will produce graduates with the capability of demonstrating the graduate outcomes. The NZDipBus graduate profile while focusing on business skills and ethical awareness lacks focus in key areas. There is no specific acknowledgement of students need for knowledge to be of global use. The graduate profile does not address information and communication skills, personal development or reflective capacity or focus on developing the international capabilities of graduates. The graduate outcomes need further explanation to guide curricula developers as to how knowledge, skills, attributes and values are to be integrated and developed within the teaching and learning environment. Overseas governments and higher education providers are well aware of the impact of these trends on the qualifications and are taking deliberate steps to include specific graduate outcomes in qualifications. The NZDipBus graduate programme designers appear to have missed a wonderful opportunity to re-vision the qualification for the 21st century by acknowledging and incorporating these important trends into a popular business qualification. Curriculum developers have not embedded interpersonal and communication skills, ethical and cultural issues, working within teams into the curriculum of the courses reviewed. This is probably due to lack of direction from the programme developers. The curriculum appears to be almost singularly focused on knowledge and skills to the detriment of attributes and values. Furthermore, teaching and learning activities and assessment will not develop graduate outcomes unless there is a clear alignment between the graduate profile and the course learning outcomes. Essentially, the qualification is not delivering what is promised because of a lack of leadership and alignment.

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  • Ethical challenges from the real world: Student experiences in cooperative education placements

    Ayling, Diana (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Developing a moral business person is not easy. Universities and polytechnics have always undertaken some degree of responsibility for teaching ethics. Increasingly students are exposed to real world work issues when assigned to cooperative education placements. The workplace demands graduates not only consider ethical issues, but also requires them to consider ethical action. In this research project the author reviewed the ethical requirements of the Industry Based Learning course in the Bachelor of Business at Unitec, Auckland with a view to informing teaching and learning practice. The aim of the research was to evaluate student learning in ethical issues and learn more about student experiences and how delivery and student support mechanisms for students could be improved. The author examined student writing (learning journals and reflective essays) and interview text to explore student knowledge of ethical values, their decision making processes and their ability to take ethical action. Students were completely comfortable with the ethical values on which the research was based. They spoke articulately about the ethical issues they found in their placements. Students used a variety of decision making processes with mixed success. Most students reported feeling vulnerable in taking ethical action and that their emotions prevented them from acting as professionals in the workplace. Ethics is an essential part of business education for both professional and non professional graduates. In the Industry Based Learning course in the Bachelor of Business placements gave students a unique opportunity to explore their ethical understandings, to practice their reasoning skills and to experiment with taking ethical action in a guided and supported environment. As a result of the research the course coordinator introduced a variety of teaching and learning strategies to support students in their placements and prepare them for the changing and variable nature of the workplace.

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  • Ecosensitive stormwater system design for sub-division

    Fernando, Achela; Iszard, Mark; Islam, Nazrul (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Stormwater management is a contentious aspect of development in the 21st century. Although hydrological neutrality before and after a development is sought, it is acknowledged that any alterations to land form result in a change in the hydrological regime. Thus the goal of agencies whose responsibility it is to manage stormwater effectively is to minimise the adverse impacts of new developments on the environment. To achieve this more reasonable objective, these agencies have developed objectives and policies backed up by design criteria and requirements that developers are required to meet as part of their development proposals. The Waitakere City Council (WCC), and the Auckland Regional Council (ARC) have worked closely together to develop a number of stormwater management manuals and design standards consistent with the Resource Management Act (1991). This paper reports the outcome of an investigation into the sustainable engineering design options satisfying the above guidelines for stormwater management for a residential sub-division in Henderson, Waitakere City using a Triple Bottom Line (TBL) assessment and a Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA). Following the evaluation of various stormwater management devices such as shared common areas to minimise impermeable surfaces, restricted earthworks onsite, stormwater reuse and attenuation tanks, rain gardens, flow dispersion devices and swales, a detailed design was produced for two types of device: Those constructed as part of the initial development of the site and those constructed by the individual plot owners. This highlights the value of apportioning the responsibilities to relevant personnel at sub-division level as well as at individual property development level. It is shown that it is both feasible and practical to design and construct an eco-sensitive, sustainable, low impact stormwater management system that meets the needs of the client and the requirements of the regulatory authorities.

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  • Role of hidden neurons in a RBF type ANN in stream flow forecasting

    Fernando, Achela; Shamseldin, Asaad (2007-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Although the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in hydrological forecasting is widespread, the use of ANNs is occasionally treated with some scepticism due to its “Black Box” nature. Their use has posed some discomfort among some of the users of traditional models in that there is no explanation of the underlying actual hydrometeorological processes that contribute to the modelled phenomena. This paper intends to present the outcome of a study conducted using the data of a stream in New Zealand to illustrate that the hidden neurons in an ANN modelling tool, indeed, do have roles to play in representing the various processes involved in the hydrological phenomenon. It sheds light on the role of the hidden neurons in a Radial Basis Function (RBF) type ANN used to forecast the streamflows using the antecedent daily flow data. It is shown that (a) the modeller can determine the level to which the hydrograph is decomposed and, therefore, the complexity of the neural network, (b) each node in the hidden layer of neurons plays a role in reconstructing the hydrograph from its components, and that (c) the contributions from the hidden layer neurons are representative of the components that make up the flow hydrograph both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is suggested that further numerical experiments with varying catchment characteristics be carried out to make conclusive remarks regarding the shapes of the composition hydrographs and ascertain if they mimic any of the traditional flow separation techniques.

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  • Use of GIS to rationalise pressure in water supply systems

    Fernando, Achela; Zhang, Xiujuan; Brown, N. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Water is a valuable resource needing conservation. Excessive water pressure in water distribution systems causes leakages leading to substantial losses of treated water. It also places additional strain on networks reducing their efficiency and increasing annual maintenance costs. Conversely, too low a water pressure can be an inconvenient annoyance to the user and, more importantly, mean inadequate conditions to meet fire fighting requirements. The North Shore City Council (NSCC) in Auckland, is not free from the aforementioned pressure-related problems. This paper summarises the outcome of a study undertaken, using GIS technology, to identify areas with potential pressure problems and suggest options for consideration to resolve pressure issues with the intension of (a) reducing water losses, (b) providing customer satisfaction, (c) ensuring fire-fighting readiness, and (d) making long term savings by strategic capital investment in the water supply network of the NSCC. First, the clusters of properties with potential pressure problems were identified. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine the optimum pressure for the key zones to minimise the number of properties affected by either low or high pressure issues. Then, the optimum pressure for each user was determined while ensuring (a) a minimum supply head of 30m for each property, (b) a maximum static head of 90m, (b) no property experiences a reduction in pressure exceeding 30m as a result of the implementation of the remedial measures suggested, and (c) a minimum residual pressure of 10m at fire hydrants during fire-fighting. Finally, a range of suggestions ranging from pressure zone boundary adjustments to sample designs that can eventually lead to potential capital expenditure are made.

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  • A portfolio model of learning: Reframing assessment practices in a business cooperative education course

    Ayling, Diana; Hodges, Dave (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper examines a portfolio model of learning in the assessment of student workplace learning. Using an interpretivist framework, an holistic assessment model is outlined in the context of a co-operative education course within an undergraduate business degree. The model involves the key stakeholders contributing to student learning, development and assessment through a ‘long conversation of informed dialogue’. In developing the model, attention is given to the prevailing positivist influences on assessment and the underlying assumptions made about ‘truth’ in learning. The paper argues that while criterion referencing may have progressed our assessment practices, positivist assumptions often underpin and limit our approaches to assessment in co-operative education. The model is presented within a social constructivist framework, arguing that cognitive and social development are key inter-connecting components of student’s workplace learning and therefore must be recognised and incorporated into assessment.

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  • A Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Approach to Multi-objective ERP Training Scheduling Problems

    Ching-Long, Su; Wu-Chen, Su (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It mainly addresses a hybrid multiobjective training scheduling genetic algorithm in this research. We can get the schedule that almost matches the real decisive results to help enterprises proceed with training scheduling successfully by the algorithm. It can reduce from a week to twenty minutes in schedule. The enterprise can cost less to proceed with the schedule and have great elasticity to make decision. Finally, it lets employee in the enterprise help ERP (enterprise resource planning) system working successfully by joining the training though the establishment of enterprise decision support system and makes the enterprises’ operation cope with changeable businessenvironment with the most effective ways.

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  • The use of e-recruiting methods: are they in a vogue and effective? Some views

    Nel, Pieter; Du Plessis, Andries; Marriott, Jeff; Mathew, Ashish (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Previously a person applied for a job using the traditional method of sending a posted résumé which took days if not weeks to return with an answer. Times have changed and the era of electronic recruitment is alive and well. This paper presents the ‘conventional’ method of recruiting; including views of different ‘new’ ways, with the focus on e-recruiting, its effectiveness and suggestions that the ‘old’ system used to recruit people is in need of an overhaul as well. The computerisation of human resource departments also means advertising jobs on the Internet, including the screening of applicants through various software packages. Does this imply that e-recruitment is in vogue and that it is effective? Companies like Nike have utilized the electronic recruiting methods in the best possible way. Software like ‘active recruiter’ has helped Nike to completely change their recruitment process and make it more effective. E-recruitment therefore seems to be revolutionising the way employers hire employees

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  • Auckland Waterfront: From a Local Political Compromise to the Global Environmental Agenda

    Bogunovich, Dushko (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The central proposition of this paper is that at this very moment Auckland has a unique historic opportunity to make a radical transition to an environmentally sustainable way of building cities. The opportunity that has presented itself is the redevelopment of a key segment of the city’s 4 km long waterfront – the area known as the Wynyard Quarter ...

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  • Late Bloomer: The Live Centre of Whangarei 1875-1909

    Francis, Kerry (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The length of Bank Street between Vine and Water Streets and Rust and Cameron Streets Whangarei was, during the 1890s, the commercial and administrative centre of the fledgling town. The most significant presence in this block is now McDonalds. In 1885 eastern side of the street contained the Melbourne Drapery, the Post Office and the County Council Building. The west side sported the Bank of New Zealand. All of these buildings were timber and single storied. The depression of the late 1880s and early 1890s stalled building activity in the North until late in the decade. The fires of 1899 and 1900 destroyed large parts of the adjoining Cameron Street and it wasn’t until the turn of the century that this part of Whangarei changed into a zone with a new scale of building and a materiality to reinforce it and resist the spread of flame. Also significant in this re development was the role of the Auckland Architect Edward Bartley. He had designed the All Saints Anglican Church in Kamo , a northern suburb in 1886 and his hospital design experience brought him again to Whangarei in the late 90s where he was responsible for the erection of a new hospital in 1900. Two new shops in the Bank Street block were completed in the same year followed by a new joint Whangarei County and Municipal Building in 1902 and a further block of shops in 1905.Subsequently, in 1908, the Post Office was rebuilt in brick to two stories and this area remained a significant commercial and administrative hub of the town until the removal of the Whangarei County to Rose Street in 1937 and the Post Office to its new premises in Rathbone Street in 1967. This paper will examine these developments and discuss the architectural sophistications that accompany them.

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  • From Modelling Domain Knowledge to Metacognitive Skills: Extending a Constraint-based Tutoring System to Support Collaboration

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Mitrovic, Branko (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Constraint-based tutors have been shown to increase individual learning in real classroom studies, but would become even more effective if they provided support for collaboration. COLLECT-UML is a constraint-based intelligent tutoring system that teaches object-oriented analysis and design using Unified Modelling Language. Being one of constraint-based tutors, COLLECT-UML represents the domain knowledge as a set of constraints. However, it is the first system to also represent a higher-level skill such as collaboration using the same formalism. We started by developing a single-user ITS. The system was evaluated in a real classroom, and the results showed that students’ performance increased significantly. In this paper, we present our experiences in extending the system to provide support for collaboration as well as problem-solving. The effectiveness of the system was evaluated in a study conducted at the University of Canterbury in May 2006. In addition to improved problem-solving skills, the participants both acquired declarative knowledge about good collaboration and did collaborate more effectively. The results, therefore, show that Constraint-Based Modelling is an effective technique for modelling and supporting collaboration skills.

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  • Evaluating a Collaborative Constraint-based Tutor for UML Class Diagrams

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Mitrovic, Branko (2007)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    COLLECT-UML is a collaborative constraint-based tutor for teaching object-oriented analysis and design using . It is the first system in the family of constraint-based tutors to represent a higher-level skill such as collaboration using constraints. We present the full evaluation study carried out at the University of Canterbury to assess the effectiveness of the system in teaching UML class diagrams and good collaboration. The results show that COLLECT-UML is an effective educational tool. In addition to improved problem-solving skills, the participants both acquired declarative knowledge about good collaboration and did collaborate more effectively. The participants have enjoyed working with the system and found it a valuable asset to their learning.

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