79 results for Conference paper, 2008

  • The capabilities approach and appraising community development programmes in Christchurch

    Schischka, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper summarises the results of a participatory appraisal methodology study carried out with groups of participants in two Christchurch based community development programmes - Sydenham Community Development Project and Manuka Cottage in Addington. Based on the capabilities approach of economist Amartya Sen the methodology extends strategies used in previous studies of participant perspectives in development initiatives in Vanuatu and Samoa. Analysis of the transcripts of the focus groups conducted in these studies reveals significant outcomes from both programmes. Particularly important was the ability of the participatory methodology used to gain the perspectives of a wide range of participants, a number of whom are marginalised from mainstream society. The predominant views among participants in all groups are reported. The prevailing sense of local ownership of both programmes together with the reputation of the community development workers are key motivators in attracting people to the projects and retaining their involvement. Discussion is provided of the limitations and difficulties encountered during the course of the study. A major theme in all of the discussions was that participants had experienced a significant increase in their confidence. Many saw their time in the programmes as very important means in becoming more involved in the community and making new contacts.

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  • International students and cooperative industry projects in ICT education: a study of impact factors

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of initial stages of a study on factors than can impact (positively or negatively) upon success of international students’ (in this case Chinese) studies overseas - with a focus on projects that require considerable self initiation, self discipline and self learning. Cooperative industry projects were chosen to conduct this study. Phase one involved observing the performance of 16 graduating students and collecting data throughout two semesters. The outcome of this phase (even though not yet final) indicates that despite popular belief (that language and cultural differences are significant barriers to Chinese students’ success), willingness, interest in topic and commitment play a crucial role in success of Chinese students in completing cooperative industry projects.

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  • Sharing Building Information using the IFC Data Model for FDS Fire Simulation

    Dimyadi, Johannes; Spearpoint, M.; Amor, R. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper describes part of a research project that looks into the potential and challenge of using the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) open standard building information model in fire engineering design. In particular the paper describes work undertaken to share building geometry and other information with the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) fire simulation model. A commercially available building information modeling (BIM) authoring application has been used to create building geometries and export IFC data files. A web-based conversion tool has been created to generate FDS input data given the output from a dedicated fire engineering IFC parser tool. The capabilities and outcome of data sharing process is illustrated in this paper using a simple test case building.

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  • The impact of wireless LAN security on performance for different windows operating systems

    Kolahi, Samad; Narayan, Shaneel; Nguyen, Du D.T.; Sunarto, Yonathan; Mani, Paul (2008-07-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper investigates the impact of various encryption techniques (WEP-64, WEP-128 and WPA) on performance of wireless LANs for Windows operating systems (Windows Server 2003, Windows XP and Windows Vista) and for both TCP and UDP protocols. The parameters considered are throughput and response time. The results indicate that security mechanism does influence the wireless performance and different operating systems provide various results.

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  • Performance evaluation of virtual private network protocols in Windows 2003 environment

    Narayan, Shaneel; Kolahi, Samad; Brooking, Kris; de Vere, Simon (2008-12-20)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a technology that provides secure communication for data as it transits through insecure regions of information technology infrastructure. With prolific development of the Internet, businesses nowadays implement VPN tunnels using different protocols that guarantee data authenticity and security between multiple sites connected using public telecommunication infrastructure. VPN provides a low-cost alternative to leasing a line to establish communication between sites. In this research we empirically evaluate performance difference between three commonly used VPN protocols, namely Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Secure Socket Layer (SSL). We compare performance differences in these protocols by implementing each using different algorithms in a Windows Server 2003 environment. Results obtained indicate that throughput in a VPN tunnel can range from approximately 40 to 90Mbps depending on the choice of protocol, algorithm and window size. These three attributes also govern CPU utilization of VPN servers.

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  • Measuring eCommerce website success

    Ghandour, Ahmad; Benwell, George L; Deans, Kenneth R; Pillai, Paul (2008)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents a research model, which is built on communication theory (Shannon and Weaver 1948) and DeLone and McLean’s (1992, 2003) information system model, to identify eCommerce website success dimensions. The research model is aiming to make a contribution to literature by identifying and incorporating dimensions of success relevant to eCommerce websites. Further empirical research is required to validate the finding.

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  • Ngā Tari Māori ki te Ao: Māori Studies in the World

    Reilly, Michael (2008)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Paper presented at Te Kāhui Kura Māori (Schools of Māori Studies Assembly) held at Te Kawa a Māui, School of Māori Studies at Victoria University of Wellington.

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  • Ngā Pūrongo o ia Tari Māori: Reflections on research, teaching, and other developments in Te Tumu

    Reilly, Michael (2008)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Paper presented at Te Kāhui Kura Māori (Schools of Māori Studies Assembly) held at Te Kawa a Māui, School of Māori Studies at Victoria University of Wellington.

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  • Brand trust as quality cues in online tertiary education

    Chung, Kim-Choy; Tan, Shin Shin (2008-01-02)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    In Malaysia and Singapore, Internet-based education has not attracted as many students as had been expected. It is reckoned that trust decreases the perceived risk of using a service. Since online learners have no direct contact with the education providers, trust plays an important role in an online tertiary setting. In a review of the literature, hypotheses are developed that suggest that brand trust as quality cues in online tertiary education is related to institutional and courseware design assurance factors, site quality and public awareness. A conceptual model summarizing the hypotheses is subsequently validated in an empirical study.

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  • Effective brand positioning of universities amongst Chinese societies in Singapore and Malaysia

    Chung, Kim-Choy; Fam, Kim-Shyan; Holdsworth, David K; Chai, Joe C Y (2008-03-20)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Although branding has become the latest focus in tertiary education to attract international students, little has been written about the influence of brand message on student’s choice of education destination in Asian markets. In a review of the literature, hypotheses are developed and summarised in a hypothetical model which was validated by questionnaire survey. The result of this study suggests that effective brand positioning of university is contingent on the type of message projected, the promotional media used, and the cultural values of potential student. The results have important implications for marketers of export education. This paper recommends further research into the influence of emotion in student’s choice of study destination.

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  • “Should I stand back, or should I lead?” Developing intentional communal cultures of emergent and distributed forms of leadership in educational settings

    Youngs, Howard (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The day to day practice of leadership in education can oscillate from being a rewarding activity one moment, to one that can be littered with confusion and dilemmas the next. Leadership practice can so often lie beyond what is prescribed and standardised, every situation brings with it a uniqueness that cannot be replicated. Leadership can be individual, role-based, conjoint and extremely fluid and emergent; it can often exist in places where we are not looking for it. This paper is informed by 32 studies of distributed forms of leadership practice from around the world and focuses on the issue of intentionality and how it is related to developing communal cultures of emergent and distributed forms of leadership. On one hand, leadership can be intentionally given out to others as a means of leadership development and also as a way of coping with the intensification of work. On the other hand leadership emerges when formal leaders intentionally stand back and allow others to flourish, be they children, adolescents, adult students, parents/caregivers, or staff. Linked to this issue is the distribution of power in our educational settings, trust, and the importance of open and transparent communication.

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  • Management of New Zealand quantity surveying practices: A longitudinal study

    Boon, John (2008-08-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This is a study of the management and strategy of quantity surveying firms in Auckland from the bottom of the property cycle in the late 1980’s to just past the next peak in 2008. Over the period the firms have developed a degree of differentiation based on the needs of clients for varying degrees of sophistication of service. This in turn leads to price differentiation. The firms who have become market leaders are all part of international groups and are able to use the expertise from within those groups to provide higher levels of sophistication of service. At the same time all firms have moved away from using contract labour and outsourcing as a means of having some flexibility in their cost structure. Because of this they may be vulnerable to incurring losses during the current downturn.

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  • Comparison of planning and consenting procedures for water resources projects in Sri Lanka and New Zealand

    Fernando, Achela; Werellagame, Induka B. (2008-11)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper compares and contrasts dam & reservoir water resources development projects between a developing and a developed country taking into consideration the drivers, approval processes, potential conflicts among stakeholders, challenges, and final execution/abandonment. As case studies, the ongoing Moragahakanda-Kaluganga multi-purpose project in Sri Lanka and attempts to develop water resources for hydropower on the upper Waitaki River at five locations on a man-made diversion canal (524MW - NZ$1.2 billion), three locations on Clutha River at Luggate (99MW-NZ$508Million), Queensberry (186MW-NZ$831Million) and Tuapeka (340MW, NZ$1.3 billion), and on Mokihinui River at Westport (~85MW) in New Zealand are analysed. The project in Sri Lanka is mainly for agriculture while those in New Zealand are for generation of hydropower and can be categorised as completely abandoned, re-considered after being shelved, and newly proposed. In comparing the two approaches for gaining approval for the development of such water resources in the two countries, the paper concludes that the priorities of the community - food security vs. cheaper power - ensure that projects in Sri Lanka proceed, sometimes with drastic steps taken to circumvent stringent conditions, while in New Zealand the projects may get shelved due to public opposition.

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  • Talk it up? Do language and learning advisors have a role in the development of spoken ‘literacy’?

    Malthus, Caroline (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    To judge from recent collections of conference proceedings, language and learning advisors focus primarily on development of student writing and study skills. This paper considers the need for a greater emphasis on spoken language, in particular interactive speaking, within the scope of learning development work. Reflecting on a teaching experience in which communication challenges for students were exposed, I argue that there are sound reasons for seeking opportunities to work in collaboration with faculty colleagues to develop spoken forms of academic literacies.

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  • Streaming the City: The Lucas Creek Park, Albany City, New Zealand

    Bradbury, Matthew (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper investigates the making of a new public space on the edge of the contemporary city. The first part of the paper starts with a discussion of contemporary thinking about the urban conditions that are found on the margins of many western cities. The paper looks at the writing about this new city, starting with the publication of ‘Edge City’ (Garreau, Joel. 1991) in the early 90s, to recent writing in the ‘The Landscape Urbanism Reader’ (Waldheim, Charles. Ed. 2006). The paper then considers the essay, ‘Making Things Public, Atmospheres of Democracy’ (Latour, Bruno, 2005) and discusses some of the ways in which Latour’s discussion could contribute to the making of new public space. The second part of the paper is a description of a design case study for a new park in Albany City, Auckland, New Zealand, designed by the author. In this case study, the author addresses one of the central concerns in the development of the contemporary city .....

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  • A workflow approach for a token web application specification

    Li, Xiaosong (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In our third year Web Application Development course, there is a traditional assignment, which requires the students design and develop a token web application in ASP.NET. We have been specifying such a token web application assignment in ordinary English. This way is not concise, intuitive, well organised and accurate. Further, it might be ambiguous, incomplete and repetitive. This study tries to normalise the specification process and the notations for future use. The research methods used in this study are case studies and experimental research. Three case studies were used and a workflow based framework for the token web application specification was proposed. The framework consists of three components: Description, Activities and Workflow Chart. The proposed framework was tested against one assignment. It was planned to be tested against other 7 assignments. The proposed framework seemed able to address some of the issues raised, so that the specification was improved. However, this needs to be confirmed by further testing.

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  • Software upgrading and the related issues

    Li, Xiaosong (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper takes Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE) and Microsoft Visual Studio .NET (VS.NET) as examples to study software upgrading and the related issues. The public browser statistics information from three different sources was used in IE study. The author’s experiments were used in VS.NET study. The IE example suggested that the software version (IE7.0) with more new features on the user interface took longer time to be accepted by the market and it could have negative impact on the software’s market share. The VS.NET example suggested that some new features might cause usability issues to the existing users and some important existing issues should be addressed in the higher priority than introducing some of the new features. Further research is required to confirm these suggestions. Further research is also required to answer the initial questions effectively.

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  • A review of development issues as they apply to construction IT

    Davies, Kathryn (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The construction industry is widely characterised as conservative in both business practices and construction methods and processes. Companies are seen as reluctant to change existing practices, despite the potential for greater efficiency and time and cost savings offered by technology now available. Supply chains are fragmented, and extensive use of sub-contacting introduces layers of management and a strong degree of autonomy in a wide variety of subgroups within a construction project team. Many studies have focused on barriers to the uptake of information technology in construction firms, with findings often framed in terms of characteristics of the industry similar to those summarised above. This paper presents a review of literature related to the introduction of IT in construction. It highlights a number of related issues that indicate that the construction industry might be better seen as cautious, but making progress, rather than resistant. While there are clearly characteristics of the construction industry that hinder widespread uptake of information technology, this can be seen as only part of the story. The argument for increased application of IT to construction processes is now well established, with identified benefits of improved productivity, financial and environmental sustainability. There are clearly gains to be made from progression in the industry from low-level business applications to construction-specific IT usage, and there are indications that the industry is ready for this to take place. To conclude the paper, the author questions why these industry characteristics often cited as barriers to innovation are not instead regarded by the proponents and developers of construction IT as constraints or design issues to be factored into the development process.

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  • Getting to yes - Agreeing research project marks without tears

    Davies, Kathryn; Birchmore, Roger (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    One of the challenges facing the management of undergraduate research projects is achieving and maintaining consistency in the marking process. High staff turnover, the introduction of new academics to supervisory teams and the desire to benchmark internationally exacerbate the challenge. The current assessment process within the Unitec Bachelor of Construction programme requires the student project first to be marked by the student’s supervisor. This is then followed by second, independent marking of all the student assignments by an external academic. When significant variation of marks occurs and post-marking negotiation between the markers cannot achieve agreement, a third independent marker is utilised. This paper outlines the development of an assessment rubric intended to provide clear standards and goals for both students and supervisors. The introduction of a rubric is intended to reduce the number of times significant variation in marks is experienced between markers. In cases where variation still occurs, the use of a rubric serves to define the problem and clarify the marking expectations. This assists with the negotiation process between the first and second markers, ideally removing the need for a third marker in most instances. In the most difficult of cases, negotiation will be required between three markers. Again, the use of the rubric allows a clear statement of the issues under discussion and the areas of divergence, allowing the participants to focus on reaching a satisfactory outcome.

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  • Up-skilling the New Zealand construction industry: a critique of the learning options

    Panko, Mary; Davies, Kathryn; Harfield, Toby; Kenley, Russell (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Education for the building and construction industry in New Zealand is facing a considerable shift in scale because of the requirement for builder licensing by 2010. The Department of Building and Housing has authorised five educational options for the industry up-skilling programme: self-directed learning, reading materials provided by the Registrar, receiving formal instruction, attending an information session, or any other activity considered by the Registrar to be relevant. This paper questions the efficacy of two of these options based on research that was undertaken in 2005 to identify the preferred learning styles of those in the construction industry. We conclude that the options ‘self-directed learning’ and ‘reading materials provided by the Registrar’ will not provide pathways to educational qualifications, but may be barriers to the success of the up-skilling project.

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