130 results for Conference paper, 2010

  • Performance comparison of IPv4 and IPv6 in peer-peer and client server local area networks

    Kolahi, Samad; Soorty, Burjiz; Chand, Navneet; Qu, Zhang (2010-06-29)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, the performance of IPv4 and IPv6 are compared for both Client-Server and Peer-Peer networks. For both networks, IPv4 produced higher bandwidth for TCP protocol. For UDP, IPv4 and IPv6 showed insignificant bandwidth differences except for packet size of 384 bytes where IPv4 had better performance in client-server environment.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory.

    Woodruffe, Paul (2010-09-15)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

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  • Industrial poetry

    Woodruffe, Paul (2010-09-15)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    One of the great opportunities that increased access to technologies and information has brought, is interdisciplinary practice between the fine arts and industrial design.As a student, these two pathways had at first appeared separate, and requiring different skills and temperament to study and practice. But on further enquiry into the subject of Landscape Architecture, which is considered an industrial design discipline, I discovered a past and present rich with unbounded trans-disciplinary and interdisciplinary practitioners, where fine art methodologies have helped find identity and belonging in landscape, and have been used to influence and inform design. I have based my Masters of Landscape Architecture project on how fine art practice could contribute to Landscape Architectural site analysis,and through this project demonstrate possibilities in interdisciplinary practice.The relationships between fine art practice and the articulation of “sense of place” has always been evident in map making, and it is in this cross-over that I hope to find a usefulness to Landscape architecture within my work.In this paper I describe my methods and findings from this project so far.

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  • Narratives of relatedness in ecological sustainability in early childhood education in Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper provides an overview of the context and some preliminary findings from a current two year Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) funded study, “Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua: We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning”. Central to the study has been the recognition of interdependent inter-relatedness as expressed in kaupapa Māori notions of manaakitanga, aroha, and kaitiakitanga, as well as in the ‘ethic of care’ outlined in the work of some western educational philosophers (P. Martin, 2007; Noddings, 1994). Whilst the data gathered from the ten different early childhood centres is extensive, this paper considers that contributed from Richard Hudson Kindergarten in Dunedin.

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  • Resources in unexpected places: Social cohesion and successful community internet

    Williams, Jocelyn (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The assumption that internet access is a means of building stronger communities is commonly found in a number of sectors, such as in New Zealand government social services policy. In response to this assumption, case study research examined the experience of free home internet access among families participating in New Zealand’s Computers in Homes (CIH) scheme in low socioeconomic Auckland school communities between 2003 and 2005. The goal of the study was to assess how internet access and social cohesion are related in a free home internet scheme. Data from 22 participants at Case A and Case B over two waves of research showed internet use declined across the group as a whole. This negative overall outcome was mitigated not only by a range of positive experiences and some individual ‘high-connector’ internet users, but also evidence that greater social cohesion was associated with the activities and interpersonal influence of confident internet users at Case A. Here, significantly greater retention of ongoing internet use also occurred. Thus a positive relationship existed in this research between internet access and social cohesion in one case study of two, where conditions included the presence of opinion leaders and social solidarity. A key finding of the study is therefore that ongoing internet use may be more successfully embedded in a setting where social cohesion is more readily apparent at the time that a free internet scheme is implemented. The Computers in Homes concept extends participants’ social experiences of community through the way it is structured and implemented, creating opportunities for face to face social interaction and support. In combination with the mobilising behaviours of leader figures, these social experiences may be factors associated with longer term viability of a free home internet scheme as much as the presence of the internet itself. This paper responds in particular to the conference theme of ‘expecting the unexpected’. Contrary to expectation, at Case A top down stakeholder dynamics and confused accountability when external agencies are involved did not appear to harm longer term project viability. This paper explores possible reasons for this contradiction.

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  • Intentional immigrant entrepreneurs

    Cruickshank, Prue (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

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  • The cluster approach revisited

    Kestle, Linda; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-05-14)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The UN Cluster approach came from the Humanitarian Response Review (HRR) commissioned by the UN in 2005. The intention of that review was to address apparent failures in the speed, quality and effectiveness of humanitarian responses and in addition the lack of any common basis for assessing and comparing levels of need. Levels and techniques of funding were also found to be inadequate. The Cluster Approach would identify lead organizations for typically 10 key areas or clusters such as Food and Nutrition, Water and Sanitation, Health, Emergency Shelter, Early Recovery and Reconstruction, IT Telecommunications, Logistics, Camp Management and Protection and Education (as happened in Pakistan after the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake). One of the case study areas used for the HRR was the West Darfur situation. And this paper re-visits that situation based on data collected there in June 2004 as part of testing of the Kestle Framework. The paper revisits the development and validation of that framework and then compares it to the Cluster Approach and suggests a way to move ahead by merging the framework into the Cluster Approach to produce an enhanced more robust approach.

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  • Destabilising the studio - teaching architectural design in China

    van Raat, Tony (2010-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Cooperative ventures in international education frequently involve transitioning students from one learning paradigm to another. This is particularly the case in joint programmes in architecture where lateral thinking and creativity, often assumed to be characteristics of western education, encounter a more didactic and teacher-focussed educational model in developing countries. This paper explores the strategies that have been employed in joint programmes in architecture developed between an educational provider in New Zealand and China. Many Chinese students are accustomed to an education "which emphasises not only the technical aspects of the discipline but also encourages them to generate responses to architectural problems based on a formulaic understanding of fundamental typologies. In order to prepare them for a more lateral and exploratory educational experience in the west it has proven necessary to first destabilise their understandings of the design process before introducing them to design studio projects typical of Australasian architecture programmes. This strategy described in this paper has been developed over 6 years of experience in teaching joint courses in several Universities in China, the students from which may transition into a programme in New Zealand and thereafter work globally. It is founded on an appreciation of work undertaken by the anthropologist Gregory Bateson and others on how people model their experiences of the world and how the adoption of new models can enlarge human creativity. Derived from this a major subtext to this project is to develop in the students' minds the conception of architecture as a humanistic discipline by replacing a model which emphasise the centrality of technology and 'given' solutions with one concerned with a less certain and more flexible, more intense and more personalised involvement with the questions which the next generation of architects will need to answer.

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  • Wasted opportunities: Developing resiliency in architecture through ecosystem biomimicry

    Balle, Brad; McConchie, Graeme (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Surplus buildings are frequently demolished and replaced under the assumption that it is cheaper to replace than adapt. The demolished building becomes waste material, usually ending up in landfills. Yet in nature discarded waste does not exist – it instead becomes ‘food’ for other flora and fauna. So too can surplus artificial waste become ‘food’ for new construction, thereby prolonging the life-cycle of materials by seeking new opportunities for their reinvestment in a building. We can thus rethink a building as a long duration work-in-progress, constantly developing and changing incrementally under changing conditions of context; designed to be readily susceptible – not resistant – to adaptation and growth. The energy-conservative re-use of an existing building and materials represents a positive response to the environmental sustainability imperative. Yet, whilst gently adding layers and texture over time through gradual, incremental growth, this re-use paradigm also ensures a continuing social familiarity with the urban landscape and the sustainability of associated memory. This paper critically examines the reuse paradigm and appraises the application of re-use strategies, taking as its case study a post-graduate architectural research project based in the adaptive re-use of an electricity substation building and site in the city-fringe suburb of Kingsland in Auckland, New Zealand.

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  • Showcasing green urbanism on waterfronts: A comparative study of Porto Alegre and Auckland

    Bogunovich, Dushko; Wagner, Cesar (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Porto Alegre and Auckland - being port cities on river estuaries, comparable in size and age, and sharing a number of morphological analogies - are similar enough to enable and justify a comparative analysis and evaluation of the physical opportunities for redevelopment. We are particularly interested in possibilities for a faster transition to environmentally sustainable and technologically resilient models of urban development. The context to this investigation is the imminent global environmental crisis and the growing political and scientific consensus that cities are at the centre of this crisis. They are the main culprit, and they will be the main victim if nothing is done. Cities must undergo a radical technological overhaul – which means replacing their obsolete infrastructure and architecture with cleaner and smarter solutions. This is a colossal task, which must be accomplished in the next 10 to 20 years, worldwide. Demonstrating what sustainable urban development looks like and how it works will be critical in mobilising governments, industries and populations. Such demonstration will be more effective if done on particularly prominent locations. In port and coastal cities, these spaces and locations are typically found on their waterfronts. Both Auckland and Porto Alegre have excellent opportunities to redevelop the unused, or poorly used, segments of their waterfronts. Both cities have started the redevelopment process and have aspirations and plans for even more transformation and investment. The areas compared in the study are the Auckland ‘CBD waterfront’ and Porto Alegre’s ‘Cais Mauá’. Both zones are about 2 km long and between 60 and 150 metres deep. The existing planning documents and declarations, as well as already executed projects, have been assessed in terms of their expected environmental performance and in terms of their perceived significance in promoting advanced forms of ecologically sound urbanism. Accomplished international examples of ‘green urban waterfronts’ have been used as benchmarks (Toronto; Vancouver; Melbourne; Hamburg; Malmo; and others).

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  • Experiments on common grounds: Four Auckland houses by Richard Hobin (1949-1953)

    Francis, Kerry; Smith, Gregory (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In Auckland in the 1950s a group of architecture students and young graduates were exploring innovative techniques of small scale construction. While these explorations can be seen in the context of a broader, global post-war interest in rational construction, they did appear to have a particularly New Zealand flavour; working as they were with a local light timber frame and its supporting concrete technologies. Collectively known as Structural Developments, this group was concentrated around the structural and material interests of Richard Hobin. This paper examines four houses designed and built by Hobin in Auckland between 1949 and 1953; the now demolished Strewe house in Glen Eden, the Taylor house in Devonport, the Bryant house in Forrest Hill and the J.M. Hobin house in Point Chevalier. The examination reveals the beginnings of a life long interest in structural and material innovation, unfortunately lost to this country when Hobin left for London in 1954, where he remained for the rest of his career.

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  • Sustainable timber potential for Northland, New Zealand

    Newman, Neil; Francis, Kerry (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper explores the feasibility and potential use of locally grown timber alternatives to chemically treated Pinus radiata for domestic construction in the Northland region. Current and potential locally grown alternative timber resources are initially identified through direct contact with local forest managers, sawmill operators, and timber suppliers. This is followed by an investigation and description of the characteristics specific to each of the available timbers. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of using the timbers within domestic construction, and examines what methods are available for architects to use these timbers within the current framework of the New Zealand Building Code.

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  • Cost effective quality: next generation building controls?

    Murphy, Chris (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2004 the New Zealand Government reviewed the New Zealand Building Act. The review was prompted by increasing concern at the lack of weather tightness evident in buildings constructed since the initial performance based Building Act was passed in 1991. Now, in 2010, some six years after the 2004 review and against a continued backdrop of non-performing leaking buildings, the Government is preparing to review the Building Act again. This paper will provide a brief history of the controversy surrounding building under performance in New Zealand since the initial Act was passed. It will summarize the changes brought about by the 2004 Building Act. It will also discuss the reasons for the Government’s desire to yet again initiate amendments, particularly in areas related to the exemption of minor works, low risk dwellings and the rationalization of building consent processes. The paper reinforces the view that changes lessening the degree of oversight by Building Consent Authorities (BCAs) to building work should proceed cautiously, and then only after the appropriate back up legislative and educational systems have had time to coalesce and prove their effectiveness.

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  • Compacting suburbia: The case for moving buildings

    Turner, David (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Processes of intensification lead to some unforeseen consequences. One such unplanned consequence is the rearrangement of existing buildings in new or revised spatial patterns. In pursuit of higher densities, large lot suburban development inherited from previous generations – the quarter-acre section - is “intensified” by cross-leasing rear gardens. The site frequently has greater commercial value than the existing buildings. Where the existing house is below the value expected by the market a house mover can be contracted to saw the building into sections, and truck it away to another, lower value site. In larger developments several houses may be shifted off a site to clear space for higher density new housing. Houses subjected to this rearrangement are known as “re-locatables”. They are displayed in “relocatables yards”, from which they can be purchased for re-use elsewhere. The practice is known in other countries where timber frame construction is a standard house-building method, but is thought to be a more popular habit in New Zealand, where up to 10% of the annual housing supply is affected by moving buildings. There are casualties in this process including historical reliability of the urban landscape; but there is also an argument in favour, since analysis shows that the practice of re-cycling has merit as a sustainable building supply methodology. This paper explores the increasingly temporary nature of the built environment in New Zealand’s cities: the temporary reality of suburbia as a phenomenon of, on one hand, a socio-cultural disinterest in permanence of place, and on the other, a building culture of light-weight construction that can readily relocate its products.

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  • “Fly on the wall” Can the presence of the student during the assessment process help in their learning?

    Rennie, Julian (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Design studio learning system within most Tertiary Design Schools has a unique critique method, (often called “The Crit”). The Crit event itself is rather a “veiled” process and has been analyzed and written about extensively. There has also been a lot of negative feedback from students that this form of critiquing process is not necessarily a good type of feedback process. Is there a method that protects the student’s privacy related to his or her own design work and at the same time maintains the Design School’s integrity of supplying reasoned and fair assessment within the wider Profession? A field trial scenario was designed and arranged with a group of volunteer design students, so each in turn, could sit-in and witness their own assessment / feedback session. This paper reports on this field trial, (timed to occur after the critique). The paper analyses this experiment, exploring the field trial responses, looking for links within a wider Educational literature base to the ground this “Fly on the Wall” scenario within known pedagogies.

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  • Design process: Transfer and transformation

    Wagner, Cesar; Archbold, Richard (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper is drawn from research into the learning process provided by a design studio exercise where students are asked to design an extension for an iconic modernist building in Brazil. The design problem becomes an exercise in appropriate contextual response, not just to the specific site location, and local culture, but also to the architectural language and function of an existing modernist building. The Modern movement saw in Brazil not just the rising of a talented group of young architects, committed to the design and aesthetics of the new movement, but also the development of a distinctive and unique architectural language. From the 1920s onwards the possibility for the legitimacy of any architectural work appeared to be found in the scope of the object and its specific situation, and no longer in some previous classical order. This is evidence, in the case of Brazil, of the importance attributed to the locality in pre-Brasília architecture and on the healthy relationship between form and technique. Since 2007, the Brazil Studio design course at the Department of Architecture at Unitec New Zealand, has challenged students with ideas of adaptation, transformation, and appropriate responses to strong existing contexts. This paper investigates the learning process of transfer of knowledge through the analysis and transformation of a modernist masterpiece.

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  • After the rot: Improving the durability of building envelopes in domestic housing, New Zealand

    Murphy, Chris (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The issue of weathertightness of the external building envelope in domestic scaled timber frames continues to be an issue in New Zealand, some ten years after the results of a major cladding survey into the durability and weathertightness of the exterior cladding envelope carried out by the writer in the year 2000. The fallout from leaking buildings has estimated to have cost the country billions of dollars in lost production and expensive repair. The social impact on those caught up in the leaking home has been considerable, with often heart rending tales of stress and financial hardship the result. This paper will explore the initiatives taken by the building industry and the Government since the issue became a major public concern. It will examine the influences, both positive and negative, that resulting legislation and changed building practices brought in as a result of this crisis, have had on the sustainability and affordability of the domestic dwelling in New Zealand.

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  • Raising the bar on self-access centre learning support

    Dofs, Kerstin; Hobbs, Moira (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Tertiary Learning Advisors reflect on their ‘good practice’ through three key terms: utilisation, effectiveness and individual student support. We ask ourselves: Are the facilities and the advisory service support structures utilised fully? How effective is our learners’ study? What is best practice regarding the way we support our students? This article has two main sections. The first consists of a summary of individualised student support followed by two examples of practice in this area; these include an outline of three studies focusing on support for independent language learning conducted at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) from 2006 to 2009 (Dofs & Hornby, 2006; Dofs, 2009a; Dofs, 2009b), and an up-to-date description of independent language learning in the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) at Unitec. The second section comprises a progress report from a study about the current state of ILCs in New Zealand, the issues facing them, and how these might be addressed. The main themes emerging from both the research in progress, and from the authors’ own experiences, fall into two main categories: the philosophical position of independent learning/autonomous learning in the ILC within the institute, and the implications of managing a centre to be of most benefit to students. The latter were evident in the utilisation of the ILC at one of the institutions where research led to the conclusions that it is not enough to simply provide an ILC; students also have to learn how to study independently, how to use self study materials, and how to plan for their self studies, and the ILC should provide this support, in liaison with classroom teachers.

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  • “Got any piggy sound effects? Always amusing. Oink moo quak”: Exploring consumer interactivity in response to campaigns coupling ubiquitous media

    Davis, Robert; Tiseli, Tuna (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Consumers use mobile phones to interact with media related content. We explore their interactive response with radio content using the LOOP model that defines interactivity as: synchronicity, two-way dialogue, contingency, and control. We use the text data of 24 consumers who over a 3 year period had texted into the radio station. We found that being interactive creates a sense of belongingness to a community. The interactions between participants are symbolic of the relationship between siblings and ‘best friends’. Interactivity is driven by self congruity and the communities shared aim; co-creation of the avant-garde. They protect and must feel in control of the content but also the way the community is perceived and behaves. The interactive experience is optimized when two-way dialogue is contingent and synchronous for station, consumer and community. Involved and in control of the content and process of interactivity. The research implications are discussed.

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  • Exploring service industry culture transformation as a consequence of legislative change: The case of the Real Estate Agents Act 2008

    Davis, Robert; Crotty, Mary; Hawkins, Roger (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2009, data was collected to explore industry transformation as a consequence of legislative change, that is, as a consequence of the Real Estate Agents Act 2008. In this paper we explore the response of key industry stakeholders to this legislation. The data consists of the qualitative interviews of 23 industry participants in Auckland, New Zealand. These participants included; industry trainers, potential and existing real estate agents as well as franchise owners and independent companies. Our analysis uses grounded theory as the mode of analysis. We also use the 4 core properties of service culture advocated by Ostrom et al., (2010) to guide our analysis. The research implications and limitations are discussed.

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