89 results for Conference paper, 2014

  • Embedding indigenous knowledge in the crowded space of a tertiary institution

    Keelan, Josie (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In keeping with the tradition of my people I acknowledge the indigenous people of Australia, and their ancestors all of whom have maintained the spirit of the land through the generations and will continue to do so going forward. I acknowledge other indigenous people who have travelled to the conference from the four winds. And I acknowledge there will be those at the conference who would challenge the notion of who indigenous people are. So for my purposes in the presentation, I will be referring to those who had the first communion with the land; who made the first lores and laws; who spoke the first language of the land; who designed the first cultures; who built the first abodes; who first interacted with the native flora and fauna; whose blood was first spilt on the land; who created the first learning systems; whose struggle today is to be heard when the noise of ‘the other’ is so loud it leaves no room for anyone else. Embedding indigenous knowledge into curriculum that does not have its foundation in that knowledge is a challenge many indigenous groups around the world face when invited and being allowed into the tertiary space usually after some time fighting for that right. The challenge being faced extends to the delivery of student support services and the governance and management, processes and practices of the tertiary institution. The issue is one of demonstrating the relevance of indigenous knowledge in a multicultural context where the dominant culture believes their knowledge system delivers to all when evidence clearly shows this not to be the case. The intent in this presentation is to demonstrate that when an effort is made to improve the delivery of services to indigenous students, all students benefit. The presentation will focus on Māori students in Aotearoa New Zealand and the work being done at Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec) to embed mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) in curriculum and the way in which the Institute does its business. Student support services are seen as an integral part of that conversation rather than separate from it. In 2010 Unitec adopted a Māori Success Strategy with implementation of that strategy beginning in 2011. The investment in that strategy is beginning to show results. The next challenge for the Institute will be in maintaining those outcomes once the official success, retention and completion statistics, which are the only measures government is interested in, have reached parity with non-Māori. The presence of international students is one of the many ways in which challenges to the inclusion of indigenous knowledge is presented. That is, indigenous knowledge is of no relevance to international students because they want a course of study that is the same as that which is available elsewhere in the world – a rather limiting idea of what education is about nevertheless an argument I have heard many a time from non-Māori. The reply to such a challenge is that international students can benefit hugely from the indigenous theories, models and frameworks. Additionally, the inclusion of indigenous knowledge can challenge their perceptions of the world and often strengthens their own identity. It can of course also challenge their own and their country’s ideological stand on the place of indigenous people and that can be scary. There are ways in which Māori knowledge is being made available to international students other than in the classroom and at least one case study on how a university in Auckland is doing this will be presented. The presentation therefore is about ways of moving forward whilst acknowledging the barriers that exist. Tihe mauriora (I sneeze and therefore I am)!

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  • Shades of Grey 2.0: Ethics Education Gaming

    Oldfield, James; McKnight, Carol; Goundar, Nadesa; Stewart, James; Slessor, Andrew (2014-09-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Shades of Grey education game is a team-based game that students play in a class lecturers to easily add gaming elements to their lessons. Shades of Grey is used as a mechanism to encourage the student discussion and debate of the ethical issues raised in a series of ethically challenging situations. It is expected that this will increase student engagement with the subject matter and participation in discussion. Since the initial development and testing of the Shades of Grey game (SoG) prototype in 2010 there has been significant change in the availability and capability of mobile devices in the classroom. More students are equipped with smart mobile devices, wireless networking technology is improving and technologies such as HTML5 are helping to improve cross platform internet experiences. With these changes in mind, the Shades of Grey research team have sought an internal research grant to fund the re-development of the game to make use of the mobile devices that students bring with them and to make it easier for teaching staff to customise the game for their own needs. An enhanced second version of the game has been developed and to date has been trialled in an advanced auditing course in semester two 2014. Students who played the game were given the opportunity to participate in the study of SoG by completing a questionnaire. Findings from the questionnaire were used to uncover the perceptions of students towards the game which were overwhelmingly positive. These perceptions will be used in conjunction with the facilitator's observations to inform future development and the potential for its continued use in the programme and beyond. This presentation reports on those findings and the future of the Shades of Grey education game.

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  • The use of the balanced scorecard to enhance performance culture in a New Zealand information technology organisation.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Tachiwona, G.; Sukumaran, Sukesh; Marriott, Jeff (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper shed light on how managers can use the balanced scorecard to transform low performing information technology service teams into highly productive and profitable units that meet customer service expectations. Two research questions are answered: what were the major drivers of low business performance, and how were they addressed? How did managers get the necessary buy-in from employees for the balanced scorecard to be successful? An exploratory research was executed covering three years of the balanced scorecard implementation in a New Zealand Information Technology Service Organisation interviewing managers, employees and a customer director. Some findings are: a lack of process and management leadership; communication was poor; relationships between engineers, managers, Medicare and NZIS were also tensed and distrustful. Some recommendations are made and the conclusions form the last part of the paper.

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  • Suggestion system as an HRM tool to be successful in organisations : some empirical evidence in New Zealand.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Marx, A. E.; Botha, Christoff J. (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Employees have ideas and will not submit it if the environment is not supportive. A suggestion system is as a formal procedure encouraging employees to think creatively about their work and environment to produce ideas. HRM should be creative and innovative and use any possible tool that contributes to their survival or success. The suggestion system is an undervalued tool. The success of it depends on management's commitment and involvement, proper policies, procedures and rules, an affective administration and processing process, objective evaluation of ideas and a fair recognition or rewarding system. Research executed through a qualitative approach in organisations in New Zealand resulted in a 100% response rate. Training and involving employees in the value of the system helps to be effective in using suggestion systems. Software should be used to administer and to manage the process effectively and efficiently. A flow chart was developed by the authors to assist with the use of the system.

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  • A Disruption Neighbourhood Approach to the Airline Schedule Recovery Problem

    Ishrat, S. I.; Keating, P. (2014)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Operations research (OR) has been used successfully in industry and its impact in today’s airline operations is significant. All major airlines plan their operations based on various OR models and algorithms including the important aspects of airline scheduling. However, operations do not always proceed as planned due to unforeseen disruptions which may lead to flight delays and customer dissatisfaction. Operations research methods can also be applied to the schedule disruption problems which results from irregular operations. The aim of schedule recovery is to get back to the original schedule (after a disruption) as soon as possible by means of re-scheduling the originally assigned flights. In this paper we use different approaches to recover the disrupted schedule. In the first approach we delay the flight(s) in the network without changing the originally planned aircraft and crew tasks whereas in the second approach we considered the recovery problem using the concept of disruption neighbourhood. The test instances are performed on real data on Air New Zealand’s domestic operations.

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  • Narratives of relatedness in ecological sustainability in early childhood education in Aotearoa.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper provides an overview of the context and some preliminary findings from a current two year Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) funded study, “Titiro whakamuri, hokiwhakamua : We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early year’s teaching and learning”. Central to the study has been the recognition of interdependent, inter-relatedness as expressed in kaupapa Māori notions of manaakitanga, aroha, and kaitiakitanga , as well as in the ‘ethic of care’ outlined in the work of some Western educational philosophers (P. Martin, 2007; Noddings, 1994). Whilst the data gathered from the ten different early childhood centres is extensive, this paper considers that contributed from Richard Hudson Kindergarten in Dunedin.

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  • The tempered edge : waterfront development in an age of climate change.

    Bradbury, Matthew (2014-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Urban waterfront development has followed the Baltimore waterfront model since the 1970s. This model is characterised by the formation of a thin promenade of public space with carefully choreo- graphed event architecture, behind which lies retail, commercial and residential development. The sustainability of this model has recently been called into question by the consequence of climate change manifested in recent storm events such as Hurricane Sandy. This paper proposes an alternative waterfront design model, one that builds environmental resilience into the typical waterfront development while still generating the expected real estate returns. The author expounds a development methodology using hydrologically modelling tools to measure the production of urban stormwater within the larger urban catchment. Modelling different scenarios, especially the implications in the increase of pervious surfaces, suggests a way in which the contemporary waterfront can become more resilient to the consequences of climate change while at the same time retaining an expected commercial return. A test case site is used to model the proposed methodology. The results show that to accommodate the hydrological consequence of climate change a radically reconfigured master plan must be adopted.

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  • People as a source of competitive advantage during recruitment and retention of senior managers in financial services sectors in Laos

    Du Plessis, Andries; Sumphonphakdy, S.; Oldfield, James; Marriott, Jeff (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The focus of this research paper is to identify the importance of recruiting and retaining of senior management resources in the banking industry in Laos. This paper reports on some of the findings. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used to collect data from three main banks in Laos. Interview section: the questions were designed to explore participants’ understanding of basic concepts of HRM and perspectives towards HRM in their organisations about recruitment and retention. Questionnaire section: part one involves the demographics data, while part two of the survey questions are focused on participants’ attitudes towards HRM processes such as recruitment in their organisations. The findings of the study demonstrate that HRM plays a critically important role in their banks in terms of keeping their competitive advantage. There is a lack of development and implementation of HRM practices and policies to recruit and retain the right people.

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  • Linking the spaces between : an interdisciplinary media content production project for community engagement

    Williams, Jocelyn; Bhat, Ravi; Bridgman, Geoff; Donaghey, Sara; Saifoloi, Malama; Williams, Marcus; Woodruffe, Paul (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Beginning with the question “How can the process of developing, producing and disseminating community stories, interests and issues via broadcast and social sharing of digital content be used to engage and mobilise community interests in shared endeavours that will help drive social cohesion?” - research staff, production staff, students and community groups in a tertiary education institute’s urban environs are working together during 2014 to create a series of programmes for broadcast on Face TV. We are interested to assess how, in the process of creating content for wider audiences, a strategic approach to the dissemination of this content may facilitate better communication across community stakeholders and beyond. Influenced by the view that “a strong storytelling network is essential to creating effective reach, outreach, and mobilisation of residents, community organisations and...media” (Annenberg School for Communication USC, 2013), as well as research on the uses and limitations of digital storytelling for empowerment of marginalised voices in community-based projects (Podkalicka and Campbell, 2010, Spurgeon et al., 2009), this paper explains the rationale for a multi-layered, complex methodology, the methods being used and the longer-term vision of outcomes for this type of collaboration involving a variety of shareable as well as “broadcast-able” digital content as tools in community communication strategy.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • Understanding Sustainable mobility: The potential of electric vehicles

    Stephenson, Janet; Hopkins, Debbie; Scott, Michelle (2014)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Rising awareness of the environmental impacts of dominant mobility practices lead to the development of the sustainable mobility paradigm. This paradigm advocates three features of a mobility system: 1. A reduced need to travel, 2. Modal shift towards more sustainable options, and 3. Reduced vehicle kilometres travelled. In this paper, two sets of data are presented to explore the potential of electric vehicles to contribute to a more sustainable mobility system. First, data from an international Delphi of transport experts shows how a sustainable future can be characterised by different features: efficient internal combustion engine vehicles, electric vehicles, and reduced personal car ownership. Thus electric vehicles are presented as both an opportunity and a threat in relation to sustainable mobility. A second body of empirical material is drawn from interviews with electric vehicle owners, and discusses the drivers and barriers to ownership. Interestingly, participants suggest changing mobility practices associated with electric vehicle ownership, evidenced by decreasing kilometres travelled. The paper concludes by suggesting that there may be potential for electric vehicles to contribute to a sustainable mobility future through modified mobility practices and renewable energy sources in New Zealand.

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  • Higher education governance: New Zealand reforms

    Rainsbury, Liz; Malcolm, Pam; Hart, Carol (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This study examines recent governance reforms for New Zealand polytechnics. It examines the change in the composition of councils, including the skills and experience of council members to assess the extent to which the member profile of councils has changed to reflect legislative intent. The findings show that governance capability of polytechnics has improved. In line with the government’s wish to improve performance, a higher proportion of council members now have prior experience in governance, in senior management, and in accounting and finance. These changes were largely driven by the government appointed council members. Although the number of council members with experience in the education sector has declined they still represent one-fifth of council membership.

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  • iBus: Perceptions of the rise of mobile learning in a business degree

    Oldfield, James; Dassanayake, Wajira; Kearns, Nick (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Wireless mobile devices (WMD) introduced in the first year of a tertiary business education programme at a tertiary institute in Auckland gave students the opportunity to experience mobile authentic learning as part of an initiative called iBus. Students were provided course material in an interactive iBook format, encouraged to engage in collaboration through authentic activities and utilised the device’s capability for a range of study related tasks. Their responses to this experience were recorded by anonymous online survey at the end of the semester. Responses were positive with high use rates recorded for students accessing course material (91% used ibooks) and lower yet positive rates (67%) for interactive use of the WMD in class. This paper reports on the initiative to date and the feedback provided by students on its impact upon their learning experience.

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  • A Survey on Approaches to Modeling Artifact-centric Business Processes

    Kunchala, Jyothi; Yu, Jian; Yongchareon, Sira (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Business Process Modeling using artifact-centric approach has gained increasing interest over the past few years. The ability to put data and process aspects on an equal footing has made it a powerful tool for efficient business process modeling. The artifact-centric approach is based on key business-relevant entities called business artifacts, which are central for guiding business operations as they navigate through the business operations. The artifact-centric modeling approach can be laid in a four dimensional framework called BALSA for defining business processes, where the four dimensions include business artifacts, lifecycles, services and associations. Based on this data-centric paradigm, several artifact-centric meta-models have been emerged in the recent years. Although all the proposed models claim to support the artifact-centric approach, their support in specifying the BALSA elements of artifacts was not clearly described in the existing literature. This paper reviews all existing approaches to artifact-centric modeling and also discuss to what extent they align with the BALSA framework

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  • Performance Comparison of Defense Mechanisms Against TCP SYN Flood DDoS Attack

    Kolahi, Samad; Alghalbi, Amro A.; Alotaibi, Abdulmohsen F.; Ahmed, Saarim S.; Lad, Divyesh (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The TCP SYN DDoS attack and defense prevention mechanisms is studied. Each prevention mechanism has some exclusive pros and cons over the others. In this paper, we have compared various defence mechanisms for preventing potential TCP SYN DDoS attacks. Router based TCP Intercept is found to provide the best defense while Anti DDoS Guardian gave the worst defese.

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  • A Workflow Execution Platform for Collaborative Artifact-Centric Business Processes

    Ngamakeur, Kan; Liu, Chengfei; Chaisiri, Sivadon; Yu, Jian; Yongchareon, Sira (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    To execute an artifact-centric process model, current workflow execution approaches require it to be converted to some existing executable language (e.g., BPEL) in order to run on a workflow system. We argue that the transformation can incur losses of information and degrade traceability. In this paper, we proposed and developed a workflow execution platform that directly executes a collaborative (i.e., inter-organizational) workflow specification of artifact-centric business processes without performing model conversion.

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  • Cloud-based Video Monitoring Framework: An Approach based on Software-Defined Networking for Addressing Scalability Problems

    Sandar, Nay Myo; Chaisiri, Sivadon; Yongchareon, Sira; Liesaputra, Veronica (2014-10-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Abstract. Closed-circuit television (CCTV) and Internet protocol (IP) cameras have been applied to a surveillance or monitoring system, from which users can remotely monitor video streams. The system has been employed for many applications such as home surveillance, traffic monitoring, and crime prevention. Currently, cloud computing has been integrated with the video monitoring system for achieving value-added services such as video adjustment, encoding, image/video recognition, and backup services. One of the challenges in this integration is due to the size and geographical scalability problems when video streams are transferred to and retrieved from the cloud services by numerous cameras and users, respectively. Unreliable network connectivity is a major factor that causes the problems. To deal with the scalability problems, this paper proposes a framework designed for a cloud-based video monitoring (CVM) system. In particular, this framework applies two major approaches, namely stream aggregation (SA) and software-defined networking (SDN). The SA approach can reduce the network latency between cameras and cloud services. The SDN approach can achieve the adaptive routing control which improves the network performance. With the SA and SDN approaches applied by the framework, the total latency for transferring video streams can be minimized and the scalability of the CVM system can be significantly enhanced.

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  • Uncovering Biokinetic Interfacing

    Jarrett, Ben (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The following paper details a research tangent explored within the scope of a larger project exploring a new method of interfacing the author has termed biokinetic: A biokinetic interface is a new form of dynamic and ever changing device that enables instrumental mediation between one or more users and an electronic component. This research project employs an audio media player as the vehicle for validating the concept. In order for this interface to act in a nominally universal manner, the interface itself is visually abstracted, with the intention that anyone may approach the device and sense how to use it, and intuit what is happening, without recourse to agreed-upon historical symbols such as the play triangle, and the stop square. Abstracted form would appear to have no underlying logical inference from which users can navigate the system, however in prior work, the author provisionally demonstrated – that for certain types of music at least – people appear to have a consistent and quantifiable abstracted visual language associated with specific music. It is the author’s intent to use this visual language as the basis for interfacing.

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  • Some key capabilities for strategic leaders in Lao commercial banking sector to maximise competitive advantage

    Marriott, Jeff; Du Plessis, Andries; Sukumaran, Sukesh; Manichith, Phonephet (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A commonly used approach in western countries, this paper considers the use of strategic leadership in Laos, in particular in the banking sector. The investigation looks at the understanding of banking leaders within Laos and finds many do not join the two terms of leadership and strategy together. The Laos bank leaders at senior level are aware that vision, core competencies and strategies are important to the development of their businesses in what is becoming a more competitive environment. Due to this more emphasis on developing vision and the people responsible must be implemented. Similarly leaders need to have both a short-term and long-term focus in their strategic leadership. The net result is that selection of the right person for the job is of vital importance

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  • An investigation into employees' satisfaction regarding leadership styles in the Laos banking sector

    Nel, Pieter; Vongphanakhone, Suksavanh; Sukumaran, Sukesh (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Leadership is one of the key management functions which enable an organisation to sustain its competitive advantage develop both its employees and organisational outcomes and has a direct impact on the performance and motivation of employees. This study identified practical leadership styles that the banking sector in Laos should apply to improve employee performance and motivation to provide better service to clients. The results based on 116 useable questionnaires revealed that poor leadership management is one of the key reasons that affect the performance and motivation of staff. It is recommended that leaders should apply four leadership styles, namely authentic, transformational, charismatic and participative. Using these leadership styles will perhaps lead to improved employee performance and motivation at work

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