1,378 results for Conference paper

  • Learning for the long haul : developing perceptions of learning affordances in CALL teachers

    Haines, Karen (2015)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This presentation reports on an investigation into situated teacher learning and their developing understandings of the affordances of new computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools. In-service teachers need to identify the affordances that a new tool offers for language learning in order to make decisions about which technologies they will choose to support their teaching practice. While general typologies of affordance have been identified for technology use in learning, the kinds of affordance that language teachers perceive in technology have not been specified. Sixteen tertiary teachers in Australia and New Zealand were interviewed over a period of fourteen months with reference to the knowledge they acquired around the use of new technologies in their classrooms. The term ‘learning affordance’ was coined to describe ways in which teachers perceived use of CMC tools promoted language learning in the classroom. Participants identified that new tools allowed students to engage not only with the traditional content of language learning (language skills and learning about the L2 culture) but also to engage with the processes of learning language (in relation to communication, affective factors and autonomy). Teachers also saw affordances for their teaching in relation to these areas. Implications for in-service teacher development include supporting participatory activities for on-going teacher learning such as inquiry, observation and reflection.

    View record details
  • The complexity of distributed forms of leadership in practice

    Youngs, Howard (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Distributed leadership is a free-floating concept that is often oversimplified as a mode of leadership and development suitable for twenty-first century organisations, particularly in education. This paper provides an alternative view. It draws on observations of leadership practice to provide a re-conceptualisation to distributed forms of leadership. These forms reveal the complexity of how positional authority and symbolic power co-exist in hybrid configurations to reflect day-to-day practice and provide a deeper sociological frame that can be applied to leadership development.

    View record details
  • Imparting China: some reflections on five decades of Chinese language teaching in New Zealand

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Since its introduction in the mid- 1960s , the teaching of the Chinese language in New Zealand has staked a claim at the table of arts and humanities by emphasizing , first , the importance and antiquity of Chinese civilization and then China's political and economic relevance. In spite of the increasingly close ties between the two countries, Chinese language teach­ing in New Zealand seems to be at odds with the direction of the country it­self. One glaring puzzle has been the ebb that followed the surge in Chinese language teaching and related initiatives in the mid to late 1990s.Why is this so? A historical survey of a half-century of Chinese language teaching .in New Zealand may help to explain the conundrum.

    View record details
  • Pocket auteurs : student uptake of an international collaboration in wireless moviemaking

    Wagner, Daniel (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In March 2012, students in New Zealand, England and France teamed-up (virtually) to create globisodes (globally-constructed movies shot on mobile phones). Employing Web 2 platforms to collaborate across both space and time, these international teams (each containing members from all three countries), created work exploring environmental sustainability. The international project was called Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen (ELVSS). This paper explores the outcomes of this ongoing trans-national experiment - focusing on its successes, and on its opportunities for improvement - both practically and pedagogically – with particular emphasis on the students’ experience. Did the way the module was structured influence what the students got out of it? How were their working relationships affected by differences in cultural mores; in time zones; in communication styles; in the subjects the students were specialising/majoring in during their “regular” school hours? What types of insights did they achieve on this groundbreaking project? How do they imagine the international course should be run differently? Finally, the paper will synthesise some of the suggestions made by the students for ELVSS-13, and, from those ideas, chart a direction forward.

    View record details
  • The use of flipped learning in an engineering technician management course

    Wilson, Hugh (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    BACKGROUND Flipped learning is an approach to teaching that essentially reverses the traditional teaching approach where the tutor delivers the content in class and then the students do exercises at home to provide a better understanding of the content and its application. In flipped learning this traditional approach is changed so that students learn the content in their own time before the class session and the class session is used to develop a better understanding of the content and its application. Flipped learning is already widely used and is becoming more popular in higher education. Research has indicated that it improves student performance and leads to better student engagement. However much of this research relates to arts and humanities courses which may benefit more from the approach. PURPOSE The purpose of this research was to determine whether using the flipped learning approach improved performance and student engagement in an engineering technician management course. METHOD An engineering management course has been delivered using flipped learning in 2013. The performance of the students in this flipped class in controlled assessments was compared with the performance of students who were taught the same content using a traditional lecture- based format in 2011 and 2012. Student views on the flipped learning approach were assessed from a questionnaire administered at the end of each course. RESULTS There was no difference between student performance in the flipped classes and the traditional classes. However the questionnaire indicated that a significant number of students preferred the flipped learning approach and felt that it was more effective and interesting than the traditional lecture-based approach. CONCLUSIONS The research indicated that the flipped learning approach used in the engineering management classes did not produce the performance improvements claimed by other research. This may have been due to how the approach was implemented or it may be that the approach does not yield improvements in engineering management type subjects. The course is still being developed and experience with the 2013 class has indicated possible improvements in the online presentation of the course content and in the class activities. Student engagement in the class has improved as a result of the use of the flipped learning approach as evidenced by the significant number of students who indicated their preference for the approach in the questionnaire and in student engagement in class activities.

    View record details
  • The impact of mega events on construction planning, processes and performance – Auckland’s experience of the Rugby World Cup 2011

    Shahwe, Tutsirae; Davies, Kathryn; Carson, Chris (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Internationally, mega events have been used by cities to enhance their image and improve urban spaces. Cities may be viewed as commodities, particularly when local or national governments are making the pitch for hosting rights of such events. As a commodity, they need to sell themselves, often requiring some change in the way they look and perform. New Zealand’s hosting of the Rugby World Cup (RWC) in 2011 created an opportunity for New Zealand to carry out much-needed improvements to the image of the country, the main cities, and Auckland in particular. Of the 48 World Cup games, 15 were held in Auckland, including the semi-finals and the final, as well as the opening and closing ceremonies for the event. The city required significant changes and improvements to local infrastructure, as well as expansion and upgrade of a number of venues, all within a relatively short space of time. This paper looks at some of the transformations that took place in Auckland in the lead up to the Rugby World Cup 2011, and explores the impacts of the event on planning processes and performance in the city. The paper first identifies the range of projects undertaken as part of the RWC upgrade in Auckland, and then focuses on the perceptions of seven industry representatives who were involved with key projects in the RWC development in Auckland. These individuals all participated closely in the planning and development processes of their respective projects. They have provided their reflections on how the RWC affected their projects, and lessons learnt in delivering within the context of such a mega event. The paper also briefly considers their perceptions of the social and economic impacts resulting from the RWC developments, and the opportunities lost and gained in the process.

    View record details
  • In search of key drivers for success in first year engineering courses

    Leaver, Jonathan; Fernando, D. Achela (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    BACKGROUND In 2010 and 2011 staff at Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec) became increasingly concerned at the declining success rate of students in undergraduate Diploma level engineering courses. Unitec is the largest provider of technician and technologist level engineering education in New Zealand with over 340 full time equivalent students enrolled in either the two year New Zealand Diploma in Engineering (Civil) or the three year Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Civil). In order to identify key drivers to student success a study of 73 classes incorporating 95 courses offered in 2010 and 2011 across a range of civil engineering subjects was undertaken to identify the causes for the declining success rate and implement systems to address the issue. PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to identify key drivers for success for first year students studying in the New Zealand Diploma in Engineering (Civil). The study focused on this group as they have the lowest success rates but are the most important single source of students with most of them staircasing into the Degree. The findings of this study are to be used to bring in changes to the course delivery in a way that the student retention, course completion and overall student satisfaction is improved. DESIGN/METHOD In this study 95 engineering courses offered over an 18 month period were examined. Each course was classified according to three criteria. These are firstly the proportion of mathematical content in the course; secondly class size; and finally the percentage of degree and diploma students in each class. Success rates were then analysed both by course level and by programme to determine course content based key drivers. RESULTS The study found that successful completion rates for first year (Level 4) Diploma students declined from 54% to 47% from 2010 to 2011 while those in the Degree (Level 5) rose marginally from 67% to 69%. For students who completed at least one assessment individual course success rates were as low as 38% in the Diploma and 50% in the Degree. Student dropout rates nearly halved after the first year of study in both the Degree and the Diploma from 17% and 21% respectively to 8% and 12%. However success rates were persistently low in both the Degree and Diploma with the overall success rate in the Degree ranging from 68% at Level 5 to 88% at Level 7 while in the Diploma success rates ranged from 51% at Level 4 to 76% at Level 6. Success rates showed no dependence on class size, mathematical content or the mix of degree and diploma students in a single class. CONCLUSIONS An analysis of success rates in the three year civil engineering degree and two year civil engineering diploma shows that there is no significant dependency of success rate on either class size, mathematical content of the course, or the percentage mix of degree and diploma students in combined classes. Students’ ability to make the transition from a directed learning environment at high school to a self-directed learning environment at Unitec is considered to be the most significant factor. We propose pre-semester credit-bearing introductory block course(s) in engineering fundamentals for first year students to assess and develop self-directed learning skills.

    View record details
  • Painting below zero-the Antarctic challenge

    Kestle, Linda; Gooch, Colin (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The task set was to scrape down, prepare and repaint (3coat system) a selection of exterior timber windows at Scott Base, to very strict environmental protection rules/requirements. ‘Zero Harm’ was the catchphrase. No electric tools. Temps ranged from +1ºC to -17ºC when windchill was taken into account. Never painted at temps below -12ºC. Very low humidity averaging 19-35% so the atmosphere very dry. No rain, only snow precipitation. 24/7 daylight in December, January

    View record details
  • A new shear key for rocking timber shear walls

    Loo, Wei Yuen; Kun, Chern; Quenneville, Pierre; Chouw, Nawawi (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Allowing shear walls to rock is one way of protecting structures from earthquake damage, or at least minimising this damage. Walls allowed to rock must have the ability to resist both overturning moment, and lateral forces. While resistance to overturning is typically provided by self-weight, post-tensioned cables, and/or damping devices acting as hold-downs, a particular challenge is to provide adequate resistance to lateral forces, which will not interfere with, nor disturb the function of the devices chosen to resist overturning. During an earthquake, there will typically be high contact forces between the shear keys and shear walls. Friction induced by these contact forces can add to the moment resistance against overturning – often in an unpredictable way. While supplemental moment resistance could be considered a desirable outcome in the case of non-rocking walls; in the case of rocking walls, their load limiting ability could be compromised. A new shear key concept, that is both simple and economical, is proposed and implemented at the bottom centre of an experimental timber wall that is allowed to rock. Under loading, the shear key performed as intended, providing adequate lateral resistance, while at the same time allowing the wall to rock in the intended manner.

    View record details
  • Beyond consultation: Getting good outcomes for everyone in cross-cultural resource consent practice

    Kanawa, Lisa; Stephenson, Janet; O'Brien, Marg (2009)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    When the Resource Management Act (RMA) was introduced in 1991 it brought in new requirements for the consideration of Māori knowledge and values. Nearly 20 years on, consultation with Māori has become a normal part of the resource consent process, and many best practice guidelines are available on how to consult. Less attention has been paid to what a good outcome might look like and how this might be achieved. Our research seeks to identify what makes for good resource consent processes where Māori knowledge and values are given appropriate consideration and inclusion in the process and outcomes. We report here on the first four stages of a 3-year research process. Firstly, a review of formal national guidelines on consultation and incorporating Māori values in decision making. Secondly, analysis of Environment Court decisions and how the court deals with Māori witnesses and their knowledge. Thirdly, interviews with Māori and Pākehā (New Zealanders of European descent) involved in resource consent processes in a variety of roles. Finally, we discuss a case study of a “win–win” situation in which both the hapū (kinship group) and the developer of a significant coastal development are happy with the process and outcomes in a situation where significant cultural values were at stake.

    View record details
  • Stability of residual acoustic noise variance in active control of stochastic noise

    Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper concerns about the theoretical stability of the adaptation process performed by the Filtered-x Least Mean Square (FxLMS) algorithm in active control of acoustic noise. A dynamic model for the Variance of Residual Acoustic Noise (VRAN) is developed and it is shown that the stability of this model is a sufficient condition for the stability of the adaptation process. The basic rules governing the VRAN root locus are developed, based on which an upper-bound for the adaptation step-size is derived. This upper-bound can apply to a general case with an arbitrary secondary path, unlike the traditional upper-bound used in adaptive filter theory, which was derived only for pure delay secondary paths.

    View record details
  • An Intelligent Agent Based Land Encroachment Detection Approach

    Dacey, Simon; Song, Lei; Pang, Shaoning (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Land management and planning is essential to assist the economic growth, sustainable resource use and environmental protection of a city. This paper describes a novel approach to automatic encroachment detection to assist in land management decision making. The approach begins with training the agent to identify and understand the land cover/use features (such as buildings, parks, trees and roads) that are predominant in the region of interest, and carries out segmentation on the park data using the intelligent agent developed from the training samples. Experiments on park images from Auckland New Zealand show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

    View record details
  • Learning from Industry by Using an Inquiry Based Learning Approach

    Li, Xiaosong (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Inquiry based and constructivist activities can motivate students to take charge of their own learning, understand multiple perspectives and develop high level reasoning skills. This paper describes a case study of six year teaching practice in one of our Master courses. The course requires the students to acquire critically analysis, evaluation and research skills. The course also requires the students to acquire the techniques and technologies related to many aspects of an enterprise website. There are only 32 hours for class meetings so the students have to work by themselves in most of the time. The best way to achieve the course requirements is to use the constructivist activities, let the students individually or collaboratively to work with the relevant partners and build the required knowledge and skills gradually. An assignment was developed which requires the students to investigate different aspects of an enterprise website. To complete this assignment, the students need to use an inquiry based learning approach. The practice is evaluated by using a set of survey data, a set of data observed from the marking reports and the industry feedbacks. The practice is effective, while the practice is improving; the students’ abilities of planning, investigating, analyzing, communicating and reflecting are improving as well. The students’ contributions are valuable to the industry. The paper also includes a discussion which links the teaching practice with the relevant theories.

    View record details
  • ADA MESH CITIES: Network, Space and Memory in the transitional city

    Joyce, Zita; Ballard, Su; McCaw, Caroline; Smith, Vicki; Lane, Trudy; Clothier, Ian; Randerson, Janine; Butt, Danny (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In the aftermath of the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, Christchurch, New Zealand is framed as a ‘transitional’ city, moving from its demolished past to a speculative future. The ADA Mesh Cities project asks what role media art and networks may play in the transitional city, and the practices.

    View record details
  • Cloud Music : a cloud system

    Randerson, Janine (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper suggests that artworks such as Yoko Ono’s Sky TV (1966), Hans Haacke’s Condensation Cube (1963-65), and David Behrman, Robert Watts and Bob Diamond’s Cloud Music (1974-79) are ancestors to a significant strand of contemporary art practice that binds weather, emergent technologies and the observer-participant. Such projects freed technical instrumentation (meteorological devices, cameras, video analysers and circuitry) from their conventional usage in communication or science. It will be argued that the highly variable patterns of weather provide a live, improvised score, yet are still subject to restraints, where hierarchies between artist or composer and audience, as well as human and machine, became unsettled.

    View record details
  • Waterfront Ecology: Two waterfront design case studies in Auckland N.Z. and Furong New Town, P.R. China.

    Bradbury, Matthew (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The contemporary waterfront, a real estate invention of 1970s rust belt Baltimore has proved to be a peculiarly resilient urban trope. The transformation of an industrial waterfront into a consumerist landscape follows a well-worn path that has been duplicated around the world. However this design paradigm cannot always suppress the industrial past. Contaminated soils from industrial poisoning and the discharge of contaminated stormwater from the surrounding catchment are just two of the serious environmental problems that many waterfronts must contend with. Is it possible to foreground the environmental threats and the necessary remediatory regimes as the start of a new waterfront design methodology? The author discussed the possibility of this idea by presenting two waterfront case studies, designed by the author, in Auckland New Zealand and in Furong New Town, Guangdong province, PR China.

    View record details
  • A dichotomy : conservation and tourism

    Griffiths, Christopher P.; Cray, R. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    An investigation into the complex relationship that exists between conservation and tourism territories from a landscape based perspective.Trials were performed on the Muriwai Gannet Colony, Otakamiro Headland,West Auckland.The results from this were used to hypothesize on the broader field of conservation and tourism within the landscape architecture discipline. Currently upwards of I.2 million tourists per year visit the gannet colony. The increasing gannet population has resulted in a crossover between gannet nesting territory and tourist tracks, creating challenges associated with both conservation and tourism. The research draws on the work of Robert Riddell’s eco-tourism and sustainable tourism, builds on the theories of Anna Ryan’s work concerned with representation and spatial experience and uses existing ornithological case studies carried out by Brenda Greene. Key findings include the concept of changing and inluencing tourist behaviour as a means to address landscape perception. A consideration of how the delineation of territory within landscapes that cater for conlicting territories was also undertaken. Approaching this problem through the lens of familiarity, perception and territory allows for traditional issues associated with these areas to be tackled through a localised design investigation. The conclusions identified the need for luidity, change, integration and shift as ways in which territorial luency or a symbiosis in landscapes with conservation and tourism can be achieved. For the broader field of landscape architecture, this research offers new ways of looking at behaviour, territory and relationships within landscape, and how traditional methods of design for these areas might be manipulated to provide for a resilient future.

    View record details
  • Parametric Models of Coastal Settlements' Growth

    Dove, K.; Popov, Nikolay (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Parametric design has been widely used by architects. However within landscape architecture and urban design its use has been very limited (Steino, 2012). This paper reports on initial findings of on-going research that aims at investigating the applicability of parametric design concepts when evaluating growth scenarios in small coastal settlements within New Zealand. The objective of this research project is twofold. Firstly, it identifies issues associated with urban growth, alongside current urban design approaches. Secondly, the project aims to take the parametric design discourse out of its academic context and test its applicability on a real site that is under pressure from growth. This is explored by developing parametric urban design systems that operate at different scales. The case study site is Pataua North, Whangarei Heads. This site has an expected growth demand of 5000 people (Liang, A. 2010). The developed parametric urban design system models the interconnections between greenspace, street layout and lot sizes. The advantages and shortcomings of parametric models when compared with canonical top-down urban design approaches are explored through this research. Evaluation criteria for privileging models outputs are also reviewed. The research recommends a range of possible improvements to models and speculates on the future of parametric urban design.

    View record details
  • Food Landscapes: A Landscape Model for Intensive Farming

    Lawton, Cora; Davies, Renee (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    With rising meat consumption worldwide, particularly in developing countries, there is a need to explore new approaches in designing forms to assist with affordable meat production within a framework of improved environmental sustainability. New Zealand (NZ) hos a strong agricultural history.As world leaders in research and development, agriculture shaped our nation structurally and socially and will continue to do so into the future .To facilitate the continued supply of affordable meat, exploration of initiatives in design to support sustainable agriculture is required. This paper presents a research project that has used landscape design methodology to anloyse and quantify existing intensive farming models (or chicken meat production (broiler shed farms) and explores potential design interventions that can contribute to improved quadruple bottom line outcomes in intensive farming practice in NZ. System approaches such as industrial ecology. cradle to cradle, permoculture and zero energy buildings informed a design model that reduces the intensive farming footprint while improving the interconnections between the multiple inputs and outputs required for such forming practices, within the site and brooder environment Comparison of quantitative data on aspects such as water; energy. biodiversity and waste between the existing intensive farm model and the proposed sustainable design model has shown that the inclusion of landscape architectural design methodology informing intensive farm development can improve sustainability in an economically viable way and contribute to a more appropriate approach to food production and land use.

    View record details
  • Xsection: Aucklands Contemporary Architecture Journal

    Griffiths, Pete; Aitken, D. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A new landscape journal has been developed called Xsection. This publication calls for articles from landscape practitioners, academics, and students. The journals intent is to promote rigorous discussion about landscape architectural issues from both an academic and professional viewpoint with a particular emphasis on the voice of young landscape architects. The theme evolves each year and is topical to Auckland.The journal has a refereed section. These articles are double blind peer reviewed by a panel comprising local academics, professionals and international academics. The journal is also a credit bearing negotiated study course for Bachelor of Landscape Architecture students. A research question is developed and information is gathered on this topic in the form of articles. This information is then edited and sorted into sections that deal with particular aspects of the theme. Students then develop a response to the data collected and produce a conclusion to the journal that expresses some answers to the question posed. The journal is published and disseminated to 2500 members of the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA) and is available as an e-journal. The connection to industry is important as the relationships established through the production of the journal help to generate ongoing contacts that feed into teaching and research. The journal is a means whereby the Auckland approach to landscape architecture can be fore grounded and disseminated. The project contributes to the research environment by way of creating a vessel for double blind peer review articles and promotes ongoing contemporary discussion about landscape architecture in Auckland.

    View record details