1,541 results for Conference paper

  • eLearning initiative for education in ICT

    McCarthy, C.; Ross, J. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    CPIT has recently started offering the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT) (Level 5) in a blended delivery format to a small group of students under the Ministry of Education’s Digital Opportunities (DigiOPs) Community Technicians Project. This paper documents, reflects on and reviews the initial set-up, preparation and start-up of delivering the DipICT (Level 5) to a group of students located in remote rural areas throughout New Zealand. The results of this initial review, along with the two further stages of evaluative research, will help towards supporting the growth of flexible delivery methods that include eLearning and allow us to ensure effectiveness of such blends for future projects or instances of delivery.

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

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  • eLearning deployment: knowing your context

    Martin, A.; Nesbit, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines concepts from the Knowledge Management (KM) domain and looks at how they can be applied in an eLearning setting. Particular attention is paid to the notion of context as it is defined in the KM body of literature and how it was applied in the development of eLearning content for courses from the Certificate in Computing (CIC).

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  • A virtual solution to a real problem: Vmware in the classroom

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years we have witnessed rapid advancements in ICT, which in turn has led, in the industry, to a staggering growth in the number and diversity of computer and networking solutions. As a result, academic institutions and professional training organizations face serious challenges in exposing students to many different computing environments while making efficient use of limited resources. To put it bluntly, how do we easily provide people with the practical experience of working with different operating systems, server applications, switches and routers? For a number of years, tutors at the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) have been using VMWare for the teaching of Microsoft, Linux, Netware and other operating systems as well as various associated technologies. The use of VMWare allows students to complete exercises, laboratory work and practical projects involving multiple servers in multiple networks without having to leave the physical confines of a single computer. While William McEwan (2002) documents the use of virtual machines, its origins and uses in the teaching of Unix and Linux courses, this paper extends this to other operating systems and moreover shifts the focus to the supporting infrastructure required in order to extract the maximum benefit from this virtualisation of machines, devices and storage media. This paper discusses one response to the dilemma of needing to expose students to a range of rapidly evolving computing technologies while ensuring that costs are kept low and that the supporting infrastructure is reliable, robust and not easily compromised in one way or another: in short, a solution that delivers to students and staff alike, a safe, scalable and flexible learning environment.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

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  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

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  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

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  • The first time eLearner's journey: an examination of attrition and withdrawal issues in workplace-based eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the extent of the problem, or a clear understanding of what direct factors contribute to learners dropping out of eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. It also argues that undertaking an eLearning course for the first time can be experienced as daunting and overwhelming for the mature adult learner. The learner’s initial experience of confronting simultaneous, multiple learning tasks at the start of an eLearning course can contribute to an overloading of a learner’s cognitive processing ability and is one possible reason for the high levels of drop outs from an online course within the first few weeks of the course start. This paper draws on experience in the development and delivery of online management training courses to employees in the New Zealand public sector. The experience is used to develop a conceptual model of the learning journey experienced by a first-time eLearner at the start of an online course. Conclusions are drawn as to the likely factors leading to learner withdrawal, and the type, and timing of support to enhance learner retention, engagement and achievement.

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  • The workplace eLearner: Designing and delivering eLearning into the workplace

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, polytechnics and institutes of technology in New Zealand have had an extensive relationship with industry, business and the public sector employers in terms of placing students into internships, work experience, clinical placements and such like. Polytechnics are also able to secure relevant industry representatives on polytechnic programme advisory boards, for providing guidance with curriculum design and industry guidelines for applied qualifications. However, providing training and education in the workplace represents a very different situation. While polytechnics are seen as good providers of entry level workers that industry, business and the public sector can mould to their own particular culture and needs, in terms of providing training and education in the workplace, polytechnics are seen by some as inflexible, too expensive, unresponsive and not really equipped to develop and deliver programmes that are tailored to the client’s specific needs. Web-based technology enabled learning offers the potential for the New Zealand’s polytechnic sector to address many of the problems they have faced in delivering cost effective training and education into the workplace. It also has the possibility to deal with the perceived weaknesses of traditional methods of workplace-based training and instruction. While computer-based training offers the advantages of self-paced learning and skills training, the real value in a workplace learning environment is the ability to capture and leverage the knowledge, expertise and skills already present in the learners. This paper presents a case study of how a consortium of polytechnics have undertaken two related eLearning projects which deliver a national management qualification to current and aspiring supervisory personnel in the New Zealand public sector.

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  • The X files - an XML Xperience

    Kennedy, D.; Lance, M. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML – eXtensible Markup Language. A way to markup a document for content. A standard for data interchange that is being used for B2B transactions. XML is designed for use with data-centric documents. Williams et al, 2000 describe a method for mapping a RDBMS structure to an XML DTD. A non-trivial realworld example was selected, that of course outlines. A RDBMS was designed for course outlines and the structure mapped to a DTD. The DTD plus a sample document was initially validated using Internet Explorer. It was further checked using an on-line validator. The DTD was subsequently revised in line with guidelines for good XML.

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  • Immigrant entrepreneurs in Malaysia : an exploratory study on their business success and prospects in small retail business

    Abdullah, Moha; Nel, Pieter; Mellalieu, Peter; Thaker, Asmy (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It is commonly agreed that international migration is as old as human history. International migration also continues to define and reshape nations as well as affecting the culture and daily life of many people. While it would not be always correct to argue that its impact has always been benign, it is increasingly evident that migration consistently benefits the countries of destination and origin, as well as the migrants themselves. Similarly, it is undeniable that the economic development of a nation (both developed and developing alike) largely depends on the emergence of dynamic innovative entrepreneurs and new enterprise creation. Economic activities carried out by immigrant entrepreneurs and their enterprises could also be a huge potential source of entrepreneurial and economic impetus for the respective recipient countries. Their presence, role and contribution to the establishment and growth of new businesses, especially small business, in a country usually leads to economic prosperity and job creation (Ribeiro-Soriano & Mas-Verdú, 2015). The benefits of having immigrant entrepreneurs in the host country such as physical capital investment, job creation for local workers and contribution towards the country’s GDP receive considerable recognition (see Lin 2015). Congruent to this also, some countries provide special visas and entry programmes to the immigrant entrepreneurs in order to promote business activities and obtain foreign investment. Lofstrom (2014), for instance, notes that efforts to attract global immigrant entrepreneurs has not been limited to developed countries but also includes developing countries alike. While knowledge on the importance of immigrant entrepreneurs for socio-economic development exists from the traditional view of pull and push factors, there are at least two different views of the migratory pathways of international immigration. One argues that the push-pull factors of spatial imbalances in the distribution of production factors forces them to leave their place of origin for a relatively high expected outcome in the country of destination. In this regard, international migration offers technical skills and unskilled labour for receiving countries. Another view is that the immigrants with entrepreneurial and management skills are the basic source of entrepreneurial activities in the host country. These pathways of international migrants include those who search for the best place that offers opportunity for profit and to create their own jobs and employment for others. Like other countries, Malaysia is not exceptional in hosting many immigrants and some of them become entrepreneurs in their own ways, (Rahmandoust, Ahmadian, & Shah, 2011). As their presence in entrepreneurial pursuit is becoming increasingly noticeable, there is a need to explore their issues, challenges, and business prospects along with their antecedents. This is simply due to the fact that there is a dearth of knowledge and little empirical research that has been made available. As immigration continues to be a significant presence in Malaysia, it can be stated that some migrants are forced by circumstances to migrate. Others are attracted by the prospect of greater economic, social and educational opportunities for themselves and their families. Whilst many migrants take up positions in paid employment, a considerable proportion of them migrate specifically to initiate new venture startup activities. What are the specific characteristics of these entrepreneurs? What are their challenges, their successes, and their prospects for the future? What conclusions can be drawn? This article attempts to address these questions based on a survey on 314 immigrant entrepreneurs in Kuala Lumpur conducted early this year (2015).

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  • Predicting the academic performance of international students on an ongoing basis

    Han, Binglan; Watts, Michael J. (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The academic success of international students is crucial for many tertiary institutions. Early predictions of students’ learning outcomes allow for targeted support and therefore improved success rates. In this study, international students’ demographic information, past academic histories, weekly class attendance records, and assessment results in an ongoing course were used to develop models to predict student success and failure in the course on a weekly basis. The prediction models were produced with three decision tree classification algorithms: REPTree, J48 tree, and LMT on the data-mining platform WEKA. Of these, the LMT algorithm has the highest level of accuracy, but the REPTree and J48 models are simpler and easier to interpret. While the accuracies of all three models are above 75%, further research is needed to more accurately predict student failure at early stages.

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  • A student laptop roll-out for international information technology students

    Watts, Michael J.; Albakry, Kabas; Choe, Kar Wen; Han, Binglan; Hookings, Alistair; Fonua, Havea; Kumar, Rakesh; Ahmadi, Kourosh; Ketu'u, Sione (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Adequate computing resources are essential to the effective teaching of Information Technology. There are several complicating factors when these resources are provided in the context of computer laboratories. These include the reliability of machines, consistency of software environments, and adequacy of hardware and the cost in both financial and human resources. We addressed these problems by progressively phasing out desktop computers in laboratories in favour of issuing laptops to IT students. These laptops were of a consistent specification and had a standard software environment. Practical problems encountered with this approach included procuring appropriate numbers of laptops in a timely manner, challenges with technical support and monitoring of students during practical tests and exams. Procedural problems included security of the laptops, handling returns and meeting student expectations. Each of these problems was solved and we succeeded in creating an efficient, cost-effective and flexible laptop-based environment. This created an improved teaching environment where student fees could be directed to other areas, where technical staff could focus on other issues, and students have greater flexibility in their work. We can therefore recommend a transition to laptop-based teaching for Information Technology students.

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  • Performance monitoring of various network traffic generators

    Kolahi, Samad; Narayan, Shaneel; Nguyen, Du D.T.; Sunarto, Y. (2011-03-31)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, in a laboratory environment, the performance of four network traffic generators (Iperf, Netperf, D-ITG and IP Traffic) are compared. Two computers with Windows operating systems were connected via a 100 Mbps link and for various payload sizes, ranging from 128 Bytes to 1408 Bytes, the TCP traffic on the link was measured using the various monitoring tools mentioned above. The results indicate that these tools can produce significantly different results. In the Windows environment, the bandwidth that the tools measure can vary as much as 16.5 Mbps for a TCP connection over a 100 Mbps link. For the same network set up, Iperf measured the highest bandwidth (93.1 Mbps) while IP traffic the lowest (76.7 Mbps). A comparison of capabilities of traffic generators is also provided.

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  • To what extent is critical thinking affected by language demands in a level seven technical degree course?

    Marsden, Nick; Singh, Niranjan; Clarke, David (2016-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Critical thinking can be said to be among the louder ‘buzz phrases’ in education in the 21st century. Both critical thinking and communication are key employability skills. Whilst there is a body of research on critical thinking, and its role in pedagogy, there seems to be a dearth of research linking second language ability and critical thinking. This area probably needs further examination given that it relates to subject specific discourse. Moreover the debate about domain-specific and generalist critical thinking skills is arguably impacted by language in ways that could disadvantage non-native English speakers in their assessed work. This research, carried out with Automotive students in New Zealand, suggests the language support currently given on a Bachelor level course in Automotive may not be adequate, and might need to be made available in different ways because perceptions of language ability may impact on success. The findings from this project suggest that automotive students might in fact prefer more language support. This information would be useful for course designers and facilitators at institutions elsewhere, particularly where courses might attract large numbers of non-native speakers either as international or domestic students. In either case, their perceived needs and expectations on the level of language support required to succeed are a focal point of this project.

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  • Analysis of results in simulation and modeling of CDMA systems

    Kolahi, Samad (2007-07-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, using discrete event stochastic simulation by batch-means, new results have been obtained by analysing the sensitivity of CDMA blocking probability for a given traffic load against various number of calls per batch and confidence intervals. It is found that for the system under study one long simulation with one million call arrivals produce approximately 99% confidence in results while it needs 100,000 calls to achieve 95% confidence. For system under study and with 27 Erlang of traffic, the blocking probability is 0.0202 with 99% confidence and 0.0192 with 95% confidence. The impact of warm-up period on CDMA simulation is discussed. Situation with three tiers of neighbouring cells are considered when mobile compares three base stations and chooses the base station with the strongest signal.

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  • Flat tax in New Zealand : unemployment and social security taxes 1930-70

    Rankin, Keith (2016-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    With the concept of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) being mooted this year as an important reform that can facilitate our adaption to a flexible work-world characterised by short-term contracts, inequality and automation, it becomes instructive to investigate historical precedents. In particular, unconditional income (including negative income tax) solutions are linked – at least in economists' minds – to a flatter (if not flat, ie proportional) income tax structure. The practical reconceptualisation and reform of income tax and benefits that I would argue for is indeed a proportional income tax, initially set at 33 percent, coupled with a minimum publicly-sourced personal credit set initially at $175 per week ($9,080 per year).1 Such a 'basic income flat tax' schema adapts easily to New Zealand's present tax and benefits levels, and will be affordable in the near future if not already. It would allow many people – especially young people – on benefits, student allowances or low wages to bypass the Work and Income bureaucracy and get on with their lives, leaving Work and Income to focus on addressing specific needs and deprivation, and allowing sole parents to benefit directly from Child Support agreements or impositions. In this paper I investigate the flat (sometimes 'flattish') income tax that existed, under various names, between 1930 and 1970. Initially an 'unemployment tax' (the mainstay of an Unemployment Fund), in 1936 it was repackaged as an 'employment promotion tax'. Then in 1938 it was boosted and further repackaged as a 'social security tax' (with its associated Social Security Fund). From the outset, the social security tax came to be closely associated in the public mind with the universal superannuation benefit that commenced in 1940 at a modest £10 ($20) per year. This new benefit co-existed with the means-tested age-benefit, then £78 per year. The mechanism set in the 1938 Social Security Act was that the superannuation benefit would increase by £2.5 each year until it reached the level of the age-benefit, at which point the universal superannuation would displace the age-benefit for persons over 65. However, there was no explicit provision for inflation-indexing in the legislation. Inflation had not been a problem in the 1920s and 1930s, but would become so from the 1940s and most of all in the 1950s.

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  • A mobile sensor activity for ad-hoc groups

    Parsons, David; Thomas, H.; Inkila, Milla (2017-05-10T05:37:51Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Designing mobile learning activities requires us to consider which key affordances of mobile devices can support the optimum learning experience. This short paper reports on the design and testing of a BYOD mobile learning activity that was based on an analysis of affordances and a survey of student preferences. It outlines the affordances and preferences that were identified and how these were included in a broader set of design requirements. It explains the choice of tools adopted for the activity, and how they were integrated into the overall learning experience based on using mobile devices to find locations and gather sensor data. Some interim observations are made around the experience and the collaborative data set gathered by the participants.

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  • Under the Mountain - how a volcanic peak has influenced the culture, ecology and landscape history of Taranaki, New Zealand

    Davies, Renee; Lambert, R. E. (2017-05-10T05:37:12Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Mount Taranaki/Egmont occupies a central place in the history and culture of Taranaki people – Maori and European. The mystical qualities of the volcanic mountain have influenced the culture, ecology and landscape history of the area and illustrate that cultural landscapes are often predominantly associative (having powerful spiritual, artistic or cultural associations with a natural element) and broad-reaching in their manifestation within a diversity of cultures. Our human need for a sense of identity and belonging is strongly linked to landscape and place. As Taylor notes [1] ‗Landscape therefore is not simply what we see, but a way of seeing: we see it with our eye but interpret it with our mind and ascribe values to landscape for intangible – spiritual – reasons‘. The mountain itself and the circular ring of protected forest surrounding the mountain– which forms the Egmont National park is a strong example of an associative cultural landscape that embodies both tangible and intangible values. The circle of fertile ring-plain contains and protects the original forest of the mountain which was one of the earliest of New Zealand‘s ecological reserves to be protected and surveyed off from settlement. This circle frames the wilderness of indigenous native forest within the taming grid of a farming culture. The heritage of New Zealand surveying, settlement and forest destruction is poignantly captured in this physical landscape feature and its mystery and symbolism is illustrated in the spiritual beliefs, artistic history and economic products of the inhabitants that live under it. To the indigenous people of Taranaki - Maori, the mountain (Te Maunga) has deeply cultural and spiritual signficance. To Mana Whenua (those with geneological and local tribal authority over the land) the mountain is part of the landscape and an ancestor, it is a reference point and the names and physical features have particular significance as symbols of the people that provide meaning, order and stability. European settlers arrived in the region in 1841 and profound cultural and landscape change resulted. Throughout this time, the mountain appears in imagery and marketing for the area and the conical peak with an idyllic farming scene in the foreground has featured as a regional and national icon represented in art, advertising and symbolism. This paper explores the Maori and European connections to Mount Taranaki as a case study of an associative cultural landscape that has shaped the social and landscape history of an entire region and that continues to influence the future of this special volcanic landscape.

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  • Conceptualizing brand consumption in social media community

    Davis, Robert; Piven, I.; Breazeale, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:28Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The emergence of social media is challenging the conceptualization of the brand. This paper develops a conceptual model of the consumption of brands in Social Media Community (SMC). The research triangulates a social media focus group and face-to-face interviews. This study identifies five core drivers of brand consumption in a SMC articulated in the Five Sources Model. Managerial implications are discussed.

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