1,541 results for Conference paper

  • Fast Center Search Algorithm with Hardware implementation for Motion Estimation in HEVC Encoder

    Medhat, Ahmed; Shalaby, Ahmed; Sayed, Mohammed S.; Elsabrouty, Maha; Madipour, Farhad (2017-05-10T05:37:44Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper presents a Fast Center Search Algorithm (FCSA) and its hardware implementation design of integer Motion Estimation for High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC). FCSA achieves average time saving ratio up to 40% for HD video sequences with respect to full search, with insignificant loss in terms of PSNR performance and bit rate. The proposed hardware implementation shows that it meets the requirements of 30 4K frame per second with ±16 search window at 550 MHz. The prototyped architecture utilizes 8% of the LUTs and 4% of the slice registers in Xilinx Virtex-6 XC6VLX-550T FPGA

    View record details
  • A Highly Parallel SAD Architecture for Motion Estimation in HEVC Encoder

    Medhat, Ahmed; Shalaby, Ahmed; Sayed, Mohammed S.; Elsabrouty, Maha; Madipour, Farhad (2017-05-10T05:37:43Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The high computational cost of the motion estimation module in the new HEVC standard raises the need for efficient hardware architectures that can meet the real-time processing constraint. In addition, targeting HD and UHD resolutions increases the motion estimation processing cost beyond the capabilities of the currently existing architectures. This paper presents a highly parallel sum of absolute difference (SAD) architecture for motion estimation in HEVC encoder. The proposed architecture has 64 PUs operating in parallel to calculate the SAD values of the prediction blocks. It processes block sizes from 4x4 up to 64x64. The proposed architecture has been prototyped, simulated and synthesized on Xilinx Virtix-7 XC7VX550T FPGA. At 458 MHz clock frequency, the proposed architecture processes 30 2K resolution fps with ±20 pixels search range. The prototyped architecture utilizes 7% of the LUTs and 5% of the slice registers in Xilinx Virtex-7 XC7VX550T FPGA.

    View record details
  • Large-scale image retrieval using local binary patterns and iterative quantization

    Shakerdonyavi, M.; Shanbehzadeh, J.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2017-05-10T05:38:08Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Hashing algorithm is an efficient approximate searching algorithm for large-scale image retrieval. Learning binary code is a key step to improve its performance and it is still an ongoing challenge. The inputs of Hashing affects its performance. This paper proposes a method to improve the efficiency of learning binary code by improving the suitableness of the Hashing algorithms inputs by employing local binary patterns in extracting image features. This approach results in more compact code, less memory and computational requirement and higher performance. The reasons behind these achievements are the binary nature and high efficiency in feature generation of local binary pattern. The performance analysis consists of using CIFAR-10 and precision vs. recall rate as dataset and evaluation criteria respectively. The simulations compare the new algorithm with three state of the art and along the line algorithms from three points of view; the hashing code size, memory space and computational cost, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approach.

    View record details
  • Distributed Incremental wLPSVM Learning

    Zhu, L.; Ban, T.; Ikeda, K.; Pang, P.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2017-05-10T05:38:05Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Weighted linear proximal support vector machine (wLPSVM) is known as an efficient binary classification algorithm with good accuracy and class-imbalance robustness. In this work, original batch wLPSVM is facilitated with distributed incremental learning capability, which allows simultaneously learning from multiple streaming data sources that are geographically distributed. In our approach, incremental and distributed learning are solved as a merging problem at the same time. A new wLPSVM expression is derived. In the new expression, knowledge from samples are presented as a set of class-wised core matrices, and merging knowledge from two subsets of data can be simply accomplished by matrix addition. With the new expression, we are able to conduct incremental and distributed learning at the same time via merging knowledge from multiple incremental stages and multiple data sources.

    View record details
  • Relationship between rotational inertia of the upper limbs and latency period in the simple fast sensor motor reactions of young adults

    Gutnik, B.; Karganov, M.Yu.; Pankova, N.B.; Lebedeva, M.A.; Khlebnikova, N.N.; Zuoza, A.; Alekrinskis, A.; Zuozienė, I.; Mickevičiene, D.; Nash, Derek (2017-05-10T05:38:18Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    One of the components of this response involves the latent period of simple sensor-motor reaction that is often viewed to be the result of integrative brain function [Bernstein,1967]. The influence of the motor component in the implementation of a simple motor response and reaction time, noted by the abovementioned authors, is Associated mainly with the type of nervous system rather than biomechanical and anthropometric characteristics of participants.. The period of muscular mechanical contraction is an important element which may delay reaction time [Jiménez- Jiménez et al.,2011] and according to Bernstein [Bernstein,1967] theory there is no simple linkage between motor neuronal output and movement. This theory implies that limb shape and current physical properties of contracted musculature distort motor output. It is also known that motor output involves inertial forces, which often impede the implementation of movement [Enoka,1994; Loeb, 1985, Murray et al., 1995]. These forces, in turn, depend on the mass and length of the driving segments, as well as the localization of the centers of mass of the reacting kinematic chain [Bernstein,1967] . Masses and lengths of reacting segments may affect reaction time [Chu, 1989; Gutnik, et al, 2001, Mignardot, et al.,2010, Samaras, 2007, Williams et al.,2008]. From a biomechanical perspective the masses and lengths of the reacting segments represent their inertial features and should be treated as peripheral elements of the motor system [Lieber, 2002]. Specifically, a relationship to rotational inertia can be considered, because all movement in the joints is rotary. Some authors studied the influence of rotational inertia of the reacting segments on the duration of motor reaction. For example, Anson [Anson, 1989] artificially increased the weight of the proximal and distal segments of tested limbs. He found some delay in reaction time corresponding with increasing rotational inertia of the reacting segment and vice versa. The main shortcoming of his study was that the experimental gravitational conditions for the test were very artificial and the motor program(s) selected for this new motor action had not been properly adapted to the new environmental force conditions. Other researchers have increasingly paid attention only to the length of the limbs or total body height [Chu, 1989, Samaras,2007]. They concluded that participants with short stature and relatively short upper limbs react to simple stimuli more quickly, and vice versa. However, it must be remembered that these data are indirectly related to the inertial features of the upper extremities, because their lengths may only partially reflect these features. Some researchers noted that people with higher mass had longer reaction time, but explanations of their results were linked to only purely neural factors, such as distortion of sensory and proprioceptive signals [Mignardot et al, 2010, Williams et al., 2008]. The aim of our study was to examine the dependence of reaction time on the moment of inertia of the limbs of participants during adduction of the forearm and hand. In contrast to Anson’s [Anson, 1989] study, our research involved a large array of participants of both genders with the same age. This approach offers two advantages; the opportunity to compare the inertial characteristics of a large number of participants, and, to avoid artificial loading of their segments and, in turn, exclude adaptive response of participants.

    View record details
  • Compatibility of measuring simple reaction time in individuals using computerized and fingertip visuomotor methods

    Gutnik, B.; Lyakh, V.; Gierczuk, D.; Nash, Derek (2017-05-10T05:38:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Many studies of the reaction time (RT) expressed this index as the interval between the time of signal detection and the beginning of motor response. Reaction time is widely used in various fields of science and practice: RT assessment is an important component of health science, developmental physiology, sports medicine and can increase the thoroughness of health and clinical examinations (Bernstein, 1967; Collins et al., 2003; Henneberg et al., 2001; Kolb & Whishaw, 1995; Lovell et al.,2001; Makdissi et al.,2001; Schendel & Robertson, 2002; Warden et al.,2001). It is clear that impaired RT has functional relevance given that a rapid RT is necessary for injury avoidance and good professional skill performances. Reaction time assessment is an important component in sports medicine, especially for identification of brain concussion (Broglio & Guskiewicz, 2009; Collie et al.,2006; Collins et al.,2003). There are 2 main tests that are useful to measure reaction time. The button push reaction time test measures how quickly a participant may click (push) a button. and the fingertip visuomotor test is a procedure for conducting a reaction time test using a ruler. Advantages of computerized measurement of RT are: 1) that stimulus presentation duration is carefully controlled, 2) the period between stimuli may be easily randomized, and 3) that the time of response is easily measured (Eckner et al., 2010). Despite the advantages of computerized neuropsychological testing, it has a limited role in practice especially on the playing field (Eckner et al., 2010). Reaction time assessment tools on a computer require specialized software and specific research skills that may limit its usage. The cost of computerized testing, at $669 to $677 per person, makes them unaffordable for many low profile athletes (Grindel, 2006). It is obvious that the fingertip visuomotor field reaction time test is a very important method that is broadly used in athletic training clinics (Eckner et al., 2009; Eckner et al.,2010; Eckner & et al.,2011a,b,c). Despite of broad usage of fingertip visuomotor tests measuring RT there is little available information comparing the computerized and fingertip visuomotor methods of determining RT. In other words, the existing literature doesn’t answer the question; is the simple reaction time, tested using the simplified fingertip visuomotor method compatible with the results from the computerized methods in the same individual. We also did not find a clear answer to the question how compatible is fingertip visuomotor method selectively for the dominant and nondominant hands. The purpose of our study was to determine the individual compatibility of the simplified fingertip visuomotor method of measuring simple RT selectively for the dominant and nondominant hands of untrained healthy young people of high school age.

    View record details
  • Storm water management and improvement case of Freemans Bay Auckland

    Bradbury, Matthew; De Costa, Gregory (2017-05-10T05:38:21Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Freemans Bay is a vast and recovered industrial zone, encompassed by a petrol chemical storage facility and a tank farm. Major storm water outfall from the surrounding Freemans Bay catchment can cause contamination in the ground around the tank farm and the sea. The entire Freemans Bay catchment anticipated 244hactares, 72.7% of impervious surfaces (178hactares). The impervious surfaces are divided into 64hactares of building roofs and roads, 114hactares of driveways and footpaths. The remaining 27.3% or 66hactares of the catchment are pervious surfaces (parks, lawns and vegetated buffers which have been found to be the source of large amounts of storm water flowing through Wynyard Quarter at the bottom of the catchment), where storm water can penetrate through the ground layers as a filter for initial treatment before reaching the storm water network for discharge. However, most of the storm water is assembled and discharged via a four meter by three meter drainage pipe below Wynyard Quarter This study focuses on storm water issues identified within the Freemans Bay area. The purpose of the study is to find solutions to help manage land contamination, sea pollution and improve the storm water system within the area. A thorough investigation occurred throughout the entire catchment with the aid of Auckland GIS viewer. The findings include a design of a wetland storm water treatment system to treat the storm water produce by the 2 year storm event within the area before discharge, reduce the speed of run-off to prevent erosion and also to increase the aesthetic and recreational nature of the area.

    View record details
  • Developing a co-­design methodology for school ground greening

    Wake, Sue; Wang, Qian (2017-05-10T05:38:22Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    If school  grounds  are  developed  as  ecologically  diverse  and  environmentally  stimulating  places  that  encourage   student  engagement and learning,  they  can  contribute  to  children demonstrating,what  researchers  such  as  Chawla   and  Cushing  (2007)  have  termed, pro-environmental  behaviour.    School  ground  greening  is  the  general  term  used  for   the  transformation  of  school  grounds from  asphalt, concrete  and  grass  to  spaces  that  invite children  to  explore  and   experiment  (Dyment,  2005),and  a  significant  rationale  for  its current popularity  is  the  potential  for  developing   positive  environmental  values  and  attitudes as  a  result  of  these  nature  encounters  (Williams  & Brown,  2012).   Further,  if  children  participate  in  the  design  of  these  environments  it  can  foster creativity  and imagination,  develop   communication  and  thinking  skills,  and  engender  ownership, sharing  and  belonging  (Christidou,  Tsevreni,  Epitropou   &  Kittas,  2013).   Architectural  codesign  with  children  may  be  defined  as  them working  directly  and  collaboratively   with  designers to  contribute  and make decisions  within  the  design  process,and  this  kind  of  spatial  advocacy  is   known  to  be  empowering (Parnell,  2014). This  presentation  considers  different  ways  that  co-design  could  occur  within  the  school  environment  as  part  of  a   study investigating how  landscape  architects  can work  with  schools  to  help  with  school  ground  greening  projects   that  promote  environmental  and design  learning.  

    View record details
  • Projetos urbanos e a construção social da cidade: intervenções nas áreas portuárias de Porto Alegre e Auckland

    Melchiors, L. C.; Wagner, Cesar (2017-05-10T05:38:21Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Nas últimas décadas as cidades contemporâneas tem sido marcadas por profundas transformações em seus centros históricos. A partir dos anos 80, tornou-se uma constante mundial a discussão em torno de políticas visando a reestruturação de áreas portuárias centrais que se encontravam em processo de deterioração e abandono. Essas áreas representam a possibilidade de construção de espaços que possibilitem não apenas o encontro e a sociabilidade na esfera pública, mas também o seu resgate enquanto patrimônio cultural e ambiental, restituindo o seu protagonismo referencial para a cidade. Buscando discutir a importância destes espaços na concertação e construção social da cidade contemporânea, e de que modo ações políticas podem influenciar, positivamente ou negativamente, este processo, o trabalho aqui exposto procura refletir sobre as diferentes formas de abordagens nas transformações e reestruturações urbanas de dois projetos contemporâneos de intervenção portuária: o projeto Cais Mauá, em Porto Alegre, e o projeto Waterfront CBD em Auckland. No caso de Auckland, embora apenas parte do projeto da orla tenha sido implementado, vê-se que os espaços públicos são a ênfase da transformação. Observa-se também a participação ativa dos cidadãos neste processo, onde suas reivindicações e demandas por mais espaços públicos e parques, acarretaram em significativas mudanças no projeto inicial. Porto Alegre, por sua vez, tem seu processo de transformação da orla portuária ainda em andamento, representando uma oportunidade para a discussão dos melhores caminhos para esta reformulação. A hipótese aqui discutida é de que a participação social nos processos de intervenção em áreas urbanas significativas, contribui para a construção de espaços que atendam e respeitem as necessidades locais, tornando-se espaços de forte urbanidade. Refletindo assim, em transformações urbanas sólidas a partir da valorização dos espaços patrimoniais e do diálogo participativo. [MAIN BODY OF PAPER IN PORTUGUESE - ENGLISH LANGUAGE ABSTRACT FOLLOWS] In recent decades contemporary cities have been marked by a profound transformation in their historical centers. Starting in the 80s, it became a worldwide constant discussion around policies aimed at the redevelopment of central waterfront areas that were going through a process of decay and abandonment. These areas represent the possibility of building spaces that allow not only the meeting and sociability in the public sphere, but also its recovery as cultural and environmental heritage, thus, restoring its benchmark role for the city. Seeking to discuss the importance of these spaces on the consultation and social construction of the contemporary city, and how the political actions can influence, positively or negatively, this process, the work here exposed tries to reflect on the different forms of approaches of urban redevelopment displayed by two contemporary waterfront design intervention: the Cais Mauá project, in Porto Alegre, and the Auckland CBD Waterfront project in Auckland. In Auckland although only part of the entire project has already been implemented, it is possible to notice that public spaces are the emphasis of the transformation. It's possible to observe an active participation of the citizens in this process, where their claims and demands, for more public spaces and parks, have resulted in significant changes to the initial project. Porto Alegre, in turn, has its process of transformation of its waterfront still as a work in progress, representing an opportunity to discuss the best ways for this redesign. The hypothesis here discussed is that social participation in intervention processes of a significant urban area, contributes to the construction of spaces that meet and satisfy local needs, becoming spaces of strong urbanity. Thus reflecting on solid urban transformations from the appreciation of heritage spaces and participatory dialogue.

    View record details
  • Field studies to investigate Impact of increasing R-value of building envelope on winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses

    Su, Bin (2017-05-10T05:38:23Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    PURPOSE / CONTEXT The study investigates relationships of winter indoor relative humidity and R-value of building envelope of the Auckland houses. METHODOLOGY / APPROACH Field study of indoor micro climatic conditions. Air temperatures and relative humidity adjacent to floors and ceilings of different indoor spaces of the two houses with different R-value in their envelopes and shaded outdoor spaces were continuously measured and recorded at 15 minute intervals, 24 hours a day, by Lascar EL-USB-2 USB Humidity Data Logger during the winter months. RESULTS The study identifies the differences of winter indoor relative humidity of Auckland houses with different insulation and glazing in their envelopes and the major problems of building thermal design of local house with lightweight timber frame construction. KEY FINDINGS / IMPLICATIONS Increasing R-value in building envelope of Auckland houses in accordance with the requirements from NZS 4218:1996 to NZS 4218:2009 can significantly in- crease 19.6% of winter time when indoor relative humidity are 40% and 60%. Maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40% and 60% can minimize the indirect health effects. ORIGINALITY Quantitative relationships between R-value in building envelope and winter indoor relative humidity, and the identified thermal design problems of local houses with lightweight timber frame construction can be good references for improving indoor health conditions of the future Auckland housing development.

    View record details
  • Is radical innovation a new value-adding paradigm for construction organisations or just a current fad? : a critique.

    Puolitaival, Taija; Kestle, Linda (2017-05-10T05:37:55Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Construction Industry, globally, has long been accused of low levels of productivity and innovation and arguably cannot be as readily measured using mechanisms common to other industries. Innovation is described and defined differently according to the particular context of discourse. This research investigated a process known as ‘radical innovation’ from a published and funding perspective longitudinally over time in a range of industries, including how it may or could be interpreted, applied and add value in the construction context. A systematic and in-depth literature review was undertaken involving sources from longstanding and credible journal data bases. The findings were analysed using an interpretative methodology that incorporated a multi-dimensional measurement approach. The findings, and the subsequent critique, were broken into two components – ‘radical innovation’ persé, and ‘radical innovation’ in construction. The resultants established that ‘radical innovation’ has been explored by researchers from the 1930’s in the context of many industries, but not within the Construction Industry context – where only a handful of journal articles having been published. In addition, enablers and obstacles have been identified, with only minimal evidence of previously proven methods within the Construction Industry. A poor track record of investing in research and development, the nature of the industry being adversarial and fragmented, with many micro organisations, suggested that an action research project will be the next step to test and potentially embody ‘radical innovation’ and increase productivity.

    View record details
  • SHRM and capacity building and its impact on management employees in foreign companies in Laos

    Lockyer, Alan; Nel, Pieter; Vilayvong, Sonethavy (2017-05-10T05:38:00Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM) in capacity building can enhance the capabilities of an organisations’ workforce, which is a key value in achieving high levels of productivity. In the Laos Peoples Democratic Republic (PDR), there are numerous foreign investments to assist the country in its economic development efforts. Investors, however, require a competent local workforce to operate their businesses, especially at the management level. The main aim of this research paper is to determine the problems associated with the implementation of SHRM in capacity building of local managerial employees working in foreign businesses in Laos and how to avoid it. Semi-structured interviews was the main data collecting technique involving eleven participants from seven foreign businesses operating in Laos PDR during 2015. The findings revealed that capacity building for local managerial employees was not executed effectively. Obstacles preventing the implementation and practice of SHRM in capacity building, include limited budgets, few roles created in HRM at a strategic level, insufficient qualifications of local managerial employees and unsuitable development programmes for capacity building. A model was developed which outlines suitable steps for capacity building of the local managerial employees working in foreign businesses in Laos, to improve their performance and productivity.

    View record details
  • From source coding to MIMO : a Multi-Level Unequal Error Protection

    Barmada, Bashar; Rehman, Saeed (2017-05-10T05:37:58Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, unequal error protection (UEP) on different levels of the transmission system is proposed. Starting from the source coding level, two priority layers are produced, high priority (HP) and low priority (LP). At channel coding, each priority layer is turbo encoded with a coding rate that reflects its importance. For modulation, a more immune modulation mode is used to modulate the HP bit stream. Finally at the transmission level, a 3 × 3 MIMO is used, where more transmit antennas and time slots are offered to HP data. This arrangement of inequality over several levels increases the flexibility of the UEP system and leads to a better performance. Results show that the proposed system outperforms other semi-unequal and equal error protection systems over a wide range of channel signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially at low SNR values.

    View record details
  • Supporting BIM adoption and implementation - Case New Zealand

    Puolitaival, Taija; Amor, R.; GhaffarianHoseini, A.; Park, K. S. (2017-05-10T05:37:56Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    There is a significant list of reported reasons for why the construction industry is not adopting Building Information Modelling (BIM), or delaying the decision to use BIM. The most common reasons, regardless of the global location, have been ‘limited demand for BIM from clients or from other companies on projects’, ‘lack of standardised tools and protocols’, and ‘lack of expertise and insufficient training’. These barriers to adoption are also evident in New Zealand (NZ) context. This case study discusses the support mechanisms in place in NZ for wider BIM adoption and implementation. To address the barriers in New Zealand National Technical Standards Committee (NTSC) was established in 2012, BIM Acceleration Committee (BAC) and National BIM Education Working Group (NBEWG) in 2014. Members of the first two committees represent both industry and government. The National BIM Education Working Group has representatives from all tertiary institutes who have interest in BIM and wish to include it as part of their programmes. National Technical Standards Committee is overseeing the development of open industry standards for building and location data. BAC’s main role is to increase the use of BIM in New Zealand by generating demand for BIM through client education and by enabling the industry. This is being done through training, networks and communication, and BIM guidelines and BIM project examples. NBEWG promotes integration of BIM into all architectural, engineering and construction programmes in New Zealand by providing national curriculum guidelines and guidance in adopting BIM curriculum. All three groups work in close collaboration, supporting each other and sharing resources to guarantee consistency of the BIM message from government to industry to education. An example of collaboration is evidenced by common training packages being prepared by a group of people from industry and tertiary education

    View record details
  • Legislation revisited : new hope for the earthquake prone "home shop?"

    Murphy, Chris (2017-05-10T05:37:58Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A review of current earthquake-prone building policy undertaken by the New Zealand Ministry of Building, Innovation and Enterprise (MBIE) follow the Christchurch earthquake, resulted in the Government introducing legislation to strengthen structural requirements for all earthquake-prone building to a minimum of 35% of the New Building Standard and within a time period of 15 years and irrespective of a building location's seismic risk zone. The outcry against the original legislation led Parliament's Local Government and Environment Committee to change aspects of the Bill and call for re-submissions from the public on their appropriateness. This paper will scrutinize these re-submissions and outline the significant changes subsequently made to the Bill as a result of this "community feedback". It will compare the resultant legislation with thos countries of similar earthquake risk, specifically Japan and parts of the USA (California),and investigate the effect this new and revised legislation will have in the continued life of the small earthquake-prone "home shop" unreinforced masonry buildings that make up a significant portion of the urban fabric of the many small towns and suburban communities within New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Can a pre-participation test of movement quality predict injury in sport and exercise? Systematic review of reliability and validity for the 'Functional Movement Screen'

    Moran, Robert; Mason, Jesse; Schneiders, A. G.; Major, K.; Sullivan, S. J. (2017-05-10T05:38:00Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Sport and exercise is critical for healthy communities, but participation is inevitably associated with exposure to risk of musculoskeletal injury. Loss of participation due to injury not only threatens the health benefit of physical activity, but also impedes competitive success. Injuries are also associated with substantial economic cost and personal suffering. Poor movement quality is a factor theorised to increase risk of injury. The ‘Functional Movement Screen’ (FMS) is widely used by applied practitioners as a pre-participation screening tool to identify poor movement quality. The aim of this study was to critically appraise and synthesise studies investigating the reliability and predictive validity of the FMS.

    View record details
  • Are students acquiring the skills, competencies and work experience that align with industry needs and work-integrated learning course design?

    Hebblethwaite, Denisa (2017-05-10T05:37:58Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    According to Coll et al. (2009) “A key purpose of work‐integrated learning (WIL) is the notion of providing graduates with a comprehensive skill set desired by potential employers” (p. 15). The notion of providing a comprehensive set of skills and competencies that align with current employers’ desires can, however, be a constant challenge (Burchell, Hodges, & Rainsbury, 2000; Hodges & Burchell, 2003). WIL course designers need to not only remain up to date with key skills and attributes demanded by employers, but also need to monitor whether or not students are learning these skill sets to the satisfaction of the employers. It is hoped that by exploring students perceptions of their workplace experience through their end of placement reflections, this paper will contribute to the gap in the research in terms of what WIL students learn (Eames & Bell, 2005) and examine whether or not there is alignment between course design skill delivery and employer demands. PROGRAM The Bachelor of Business degree at Unitec involves a compulsory 30 credit Industry Based Learning (IBL) course at Level 7. In their final semester, students from five discipline areas namely; Accountancy, Finance, Human Resources, Marketing, and Operations complete a project and work tasks in industry for a period of 220 hours under the supervision of both an industry and academic supervisor. Currently, approximately 200 business students are enrolled in the IBL course annually. Students are assessed across a number of areas via a self-assessed ePortfolio of learning that evidences their work achievements and reflections of their work experience. This discussion on work-readiness and course alignment considers students across all five discipline areas of business as mentioned above.

    View record details
  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

    View record details
  • Analysing rain garden infiltration efficiency using MOUSE Model

    Li, H.; De Costa, Gregory (2017-05-10T05:37:30Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A MOUSE model was developed to simulate rain garden and calculate the annual stormwater runoff volume. The key parameter settings of the simulation model are strictly built on Auckland Regional Council Technical Publications No.10 and adapted the typical annual rainfall data acquired from Auckland City Council. The simulation result demonstrates the hydrological relationship between rain garden infiltration efficiency and different rain garden surface areas (15m2, 20 m2, 24 m2, 30 m2, 35 m2, 40 m2, 45 m2)

    View record details
  • Evaluation of statistical text normalisation techniques for Twitter

    Sosamphan, P.; Liesaputra, Veronica; Yongchareon, Dr. Sira; Mohaghegh, Dr Mahsa (2017-05-10T05:37:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    One of the major challenges in the era of big data use is how to ‘clean’ the vast amount of data, particularly from micro-blog websites like Twitter. Twitter messages, called tweets, are commonly written in ill-forms, including abbreviations, repeated characters, and misspelled words. These ‘noisy tweets’ require text normalisation techniques to detect and convert them into more accurate English sentences. There are several existing techniques proposed to solve these issues, however each technique possess some limitations and therefore cannot achieve good overall results. This paper aims to evaluate individual existing statistical normalisation methods and their possible combinations in order to find the best combination that can efficiently clean noisy tweets at the character-level, which contains abbreviations, repeated letters and misspelled words. Tested on our Twitter sample dataset, the best combination can achieve 88% accuracy in the Bilingual Evaluation Understudy (BLEU) score and 7% Word Error Rate (WER) score, both of which are considered better than the baseline model.

    View record details