1,377 results for Conference paper

  • Supporting BIM adoption and implementation - Case New Zealand

    Puolitaival, Taija; Amor, R.; GhaffarianHoseini, A.; Park, K. S. (2017-05-10T05:37:56Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    There is a significant list of reported reasons for why the construction industry is not adopting Building Information Modelling (BIM), or delaying the decision to use BIM. The most common reasons, regardless of the global location, have been ‘limited demand for BIM from clients or from other companies on projects’, ‘lack of standardised tools and protocols’, and ‘lack of expertise and insufficient training’. These barriers to adoption are also evident in New Zealand (NZ) context. This case study discusses the support mechanisms in place in NZ for wider BIM adoption and implementation. To address the barriers in New Zealand National Technical Standards Committee (NTSC) was established in 2012, BIM Acceleration Committee (BAC) and National BIM Education Working Group (NBEWG) in 2014. Members of the first two committees represent both industry and government. The National BIM Education Working Group has representatives from all tertiary institutes who have interest in BIM and wish to include it as part of their programmes. National Technical Standards Committee is overseeing the development of open industry standards for building and location data. BAC’s main role is to increase the use of BIM in New Zealand by generating demand for BIM through client education and by enabling the industry. This is being done through training, networks and communication, and BIM guidelines and BIM project examples. NBEWG promotes integration of BIM into all architectural, engineering and construction programmes in New Zealand by providing national curriculum guidelines and guidance in adopting BIM curriculum. All three groups work in close collaboration, supporting each other and sharing resources to guarantee consistency of the BIM message from government to industry to education. An example of collaboration is evidenced by common training packages being prepared by a group of people from industry and tertiary education

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  • Legislation revisited : new hope for the earthquake prone "home shop?"

    Murphy, Chris (2017-05-10T05:37:58Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A review of current earthquake-prone building policy undertaken by the New Zealand Ministry of Building, Innovation and Enterprise (MBIE) follow the Christchurch earthquake, resulted in the Government introducing legislation to strengthen structural requirements for all earthquake-prone building to a minimum of 35% of the New Building Standard and within a time period of 15 years and irrespective of a building location's seismic risk zone. The outcry against the original legislation led Parliament's Local Government and Environment Committee to change aspects of the Bill and call for re-submissions from the public on their appropriateness. This paper will scrutinize these re-submissions and outline the significant changes subsequently made to the Bill as a result of this "community feedback". It will compare the resultant legislation with thos countries of similar earthquake risk, specifically Japan and parts of the USA (California),and investigate the effect this new and revised legislation will have in the continued life of the small earthquake-prone "home shop" unreinforced masonry buildings that make up a significant portion of the urban fabric of the many small towns and suburban communities within New Zealand.

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  • Can a pre-participation test of movement quality predict injury in sport and exercise? Systematic review of reliability and validity for the 'Functional Movement Screen'

    Moran, Robert; Mason, Jesse; Schneiders, A. G.; Major, K.; Sullivan, S. J. (2017-05-10T05:38:00Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Sport and exercise is critical for healthy communities, but participation is inevitably associated with exposure to risk of musculoskeletal injury. Loss of participation due to injury not only threatens the health benefit of physical activity, but also impedes competitive success. Injuries are also associated with substantial economic cost and personal suffering. Poor movement quality is a factor theorised to increase risk of injury. The ‘Functional Movement Screen’ (FMS) is widely used by applied practitioners as a pre-participation screening tool to identify poor movement quality. The aim of this study was to critically appraise and synthesise studies investigating the reliability and predictive validity of the FMS.

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  • Are students acquiring the skills, competencies and work experience that align with industry needs and work-integrated learning course design?

    Hebblethwaite, Denisa (2017-05-10T05:37:58Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    According to Coll et al. (2009) “A key purpose of work‐integrated learning (WIL) is the notion of providing graduates with a comprehensive skill set desired by potential employers” (p. 15). The notion of providing a comprehensive set of skills and competencies that align with current employers’ desires can, however, be a constant challenge (Burchell, Hodges, & Rainsbury, 2000; Hodges & Burchell, 2003). WIL course designers need to not only remain up to date with key skills and attributes demanded by employers, but also need to monitor whether or not students are learning these skill sets to the satisfaction of the employers. It is hoped that by exploring students perceptions of their workplace experience through their end of placement reflections, this paper will contribute to the gap in the research in terms of what WIL students learn (Eames & Bell, 2005) and examine whether or not there is alignment between course design skill delivery and employer demands. PROGRAM The Bachelor of Business degree at Unitec involves a compulsory 30 credit Industry Based Learning (IBL) course at Level 7. In their final semester, students from five discipline areas namely; Accountancy, Finance, Human Resources, Marketing, and Operations complete a project and work tasks in industry for a period of 220 hours under the supervision of both an industry and academic supervisor. Currently, approximately 200 business students are enrolled in the IBL course annually. Students are assessed across a number of areas via a self-assessed ePortfolio of learning that evidences their work achievements and reflections of their work experience. This discussion on work-readiness and course alignment considers students across all five discipline areas of business as mentioned above.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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  • Analysing rain garden infiltration efficiency using MOUSE Model

    Li, H.; De Costa, Gregory (2017-05-10T05:37:30Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A MOUSE model was developed to simulate rain garden and calculate the annual stormwater runoff volume. The key parameter settings of the simulation model are strictly built on Auckland Regional Council Technical Publications No.10 and adapted the typical annual rainfall data acquired from Auckland City Council. The simulation result demonstrates the hydrological relationship between rain garden infiltration efficiency and different rain garden surface areas (15m2, 20 m2, 24 m2, 30 m2, 35 m2, 40 m2, 45 m2)

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  • Evaluation of statistical text normalisation techniques for Twitter

    Sosamphan, P.; Liesaputra, Veronica; Yongchareon, Dr. Sira; Mohaghegh, Dr Mahsa (2017-05-10T05:37:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    One of the major challenges in the era of big data use is how to ‘clean’ the vast amount of data, particularly from micro-blog websites like Twitter. Twitter messages, called tweets, are commonly written in ill-forms, including abbreviations, repeated characters, and misspelled words. These ‘noisy tweets’ require text normalisation techniques to detect and convert them into more accurate English sentences. There are several existing techniques proposed to solve these issues, however each technique possess some limitations and therefore cannot achieve good overall results. This paper aims to evaluate individual existing statistical normalisation methods and their possible combinations in order to find the best combination that can efficiently clean noisy tweets at the character-level, which contains abbreviations, repeated letters and misspelled words. Tested on our Twitter sample dataset, the best combination can achieve 88% accuracy in the Bilingual Evaluation Understudy (BLEU) score and 7% Word Error Rate (WER) score, both of which are considered better than the baseline model.

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  • A physical-aware task migration algorithm for dynamic thermal management of SMT multi-core processors

    Madipour, Farhad (2017-05-10T05:37:38Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper presents a task migration algorithm for dynamic thermal management of SMT multi-core processors. The unique features of this algorithm include: 1) considering SMT capability of the processors for task scheduling, 2) using adaptive task migration threshold, and 3) considering cores physical features. This algorithm is evaluated on a commercial SMT quad-core processor. The experimental results indicate that our technique can significantly decrease the average and peak temperature compared to Linux standard scheduler, and two well-known thermal management techniques.

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  • A design methodology for performance maintenance of 3D Network-on-Chip with multiplexed Through-Silicon Vias

    Madipour, Farhad; El-Sayed, M.; Murakami, K.; Said, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:43Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    3D integration is an emerging technology that overcomes 2D integration process limitations. The use of short Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) introduces a significant reduction in routing area, power consumption, and delay. Though, there are still several challenges in 3D integration technology need to be addressed. It is shown in literature that reducing TSV count has a considerable effect in improving yield. The TSV multiplexing technique called TSVBOX was introduced in [1] to reduce the TSV count without affecting the direct benefits of TSVs. The TSVBOX introduces some delay to the signals to be multiplexed. In this paper, we analyse the TSVBOX timing requirements and deduce a design methodology for TSVBOX-based 3D Network-on-Chip (NoC) to overcome the TSVBOX speed degradation. Performance comparisons under different traffic patterns are conducted to verify our solution. We show that TSVBOX-based 3D NoC performance is highly dependent on the NoC traffic pattern and in most simulation scenarios we tried, it shows almost the same performance of the conventional 3D NoC.

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  • Sharing Building Information using the IFC Data Model for FDS Fire Simulation

    Dimyadi, Johannes; Spearpoint, M.; Amor, R. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper describes part of a research project that looks into the potential and challenge of using the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) open standard building information model in fire engineering design. In particular the paper describes work undertaken to share building geometry and other information with the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) fire simulation model. A commercially available building information modeling (BIM) authoring application has been used to create building geometries and export IFC data files. A web-based conversion tool has been created to generate FDS input data given the output from a dedicated fire engineering IFC parser tool. The capabilities and outcome of data sharing process is illustrated in this paper using a simple test case building.

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  • BIM interoperability limitations : Australian and Malaysian rail projects.

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, T.; Behnam, A. (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Building information modelling (BIM) is defined as a process involving the generation and management of digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. The purpose of interoperability in integrated or “open” BIM is to facilitate the information exchange between different digital systems, models and tools. There has been effort towards data interoperability with development of open source standards and object- oriented models, such as industry foundation classes (IFC) for vertical infrastructure. However, the lack of open data standards for the information exchange for horizontal infrastructure limits the adoption and effectiveness of integrated BIM. The paper outlines two interoperability issues for construction of rail infrastructure. The issues are presented in two case study reports, one from Australia and one from Malaysia. The each case study includes: a description of the project, the application of BIM in the project, a discussion of the promised BIM interoperability solution plus the identification of the unresolved lack of interoperability for horizontal infrastructure project management. The Moreton Bay Rail project in Australia introduces general software interoperability issues. The Light Rail Extension project in Kuala Lumpur outlines an example of the integration problems related to two different location data structures. The paper highlights how the continuing lack of data interoperability limits utilisation of integrated BIM for horizontal infrastructure rail projects.

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  • Construction management scheduling and control : the familiar historical overview.

    Behman, A.; Harfield, T.; Kenley, Russell (2017-05-10T05:38:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper suggests that ‘management by exception’ is an historical default control mechanism based on the perception of control as a static process. However, increasingly scholars claim that a dynamic and proactive systems model is a more effective form of project control. These findings are the result of an historical desktop research method that analysed content from a small sample of scheduling methods and control approaches found in online and university library resources. The concept of control has historically influenced both visualization and analytics of different scheduling methods for construction project management. This paper focuses on two control ideals; static and dynamic control mechanisms. The overview begins with the description of early graphical scheduling techniques: Gantt charts and Harmonogram. It continues with examples of contributors to scheduling and control that include: CPM, PERT, LOB, Flowline and Location Based Management. The finding of this simple history suggests that change is the constant element for project control mechanisms. An object-based digital environment such as the data-rich building information modelling (BIM) appears to be continuing the change for new scheduling methods and control mechanisms.

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  • Performance comparison of IPv4 and IPv6 in peer-peer and client server local area networks

    Kolahi, Samad; Soorty, Burjiz; Chand, Navneet; Qu, Zhang (2010-06-29)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, the performance of IPv4 and IPv6 are compared for both Client-Server and Peer-Peer networks. For both networks, IPv4 produced higher bandwidth for TCP protocol. For UDP, IPv4 and IPv6 showed insignificant bandwidth differences except for packet size of 384 bytes where IPv4 had better performance in client-server environment.

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  • Sociomateriality Implications of Software As a Service Adoption on IT-workers’ Roles and Changes in Organizational Routines of IT Systems Support

    Mbuba, F; Wang, YYC; Olesen, K

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper aims to deepen our understanding on how sociomateriality practices influence IT workers’ roles and skill set requirements and changes to the organizational routines of IT systems support, when an organization migrates an on-premise IT system to a software as a service (SaaS) model. This conceptual paper is part of an ongoing study investigating organizations that migrated on-premise IT email systems to SaaS business models, such as Google Apps for Education (GAE) and Microsoft Office 365 systems, in New Zealand tertiary institutions. We present initial findings from interpretive case studies. The findings are, firstly, technological artifacts are entangled in sociomaterial practices, which change the way humans respond to the performative aspects of the organizational routines. Human and material agencies are interwoven in ways that reinforce or change existing routines. Secondly, materiality, virtual realm and spirit of the technology provide elementary levels at which human and material agencies entangle. Lastly, the elementary levels at which human and material entangle depends on the capabilities or skills set of an individual.

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  • Impact of building design on energy usage of Auckland Public Library

    Su, Bin (2016-05)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This pilot study is to investigate relationships between Auckland library building design and energy consumption. In Auckland, about sixty public libraries belong to the Auckland Council. A number of Auckland public libraries (32% of the total number of public libraries in Auckland) are used for this study. A whole year monthly energy consumption data and library building plans of the sample libraries are recorded and supplied by the Auckland Council. This study explores impact of building design factors on energy consumption, which is based on real energy consumption data and building design data of Auckland public libraries. This study converted monthly energy consumption data into annual, winter and summer daily mean energy consumptions per unit volume of library building indoor space (kWh/m3/day), which is closely related to building design, indoor thermal conditions and building thermal performance under the local climatic conditions. According to relationships between daily mean energy consumptions per unit volume of library building indoor space (kWh/m3/day) and library building design data, the study presents energy profiles of local libraries and identify major design factors impacting energy consumption of Auckland public libraries.

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  • Impact of building envelope design on energy consumption of light structure school building

    Su, Bin (2016-05)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    According to the local climate, an Auckland school building normally does not need air conditioning for cooling during the summer and only needs space heating during the winter. Previous study shows that the mean winter energy consumption is about 38% of the mean annual energy consumption of Auckland school buildings. The mean winter extra energy, which mainly includes space heating, water heating and other appliances related to winter indoor thermal conditions, is about 44% of winter energy consumptions. Extra winter energy of a school building is closely related to and impacted by building thermal design and thermal performance. Although different building design factors related to the main architectural feature, building elements and materials can affect the school energy consumption differently and simultaneously, the relationship between building design data and school energy consumption data can still be identified. With a larger number of sample school buildings, this study focuses on impact strength of building design factors on school winter extra energy consumptions and identifies quantitative relationships between the building design data and the winter extra energy consumption data, which can be used to proximately estimate the amount of saving winter extra energy consumption associated with the change of a design datum for the future school development. In Auckland, there are 425 schools including primary, intermediate and high schools. Real energy consumption and building design data of 57 local schools (13.4% of the total number of Auckland schools) are randomly selected for this study.

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  • Understanding driver behaviour: opportunities for greater efficiency

    Scott, Michelle Grace; Lawson, Rob (2016-09)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Road transport contributes a significant amount towards New Zealand’s carbon emissions, mostly from light vehicles. These carbon emissions could be partly reduced by an increase in more efficient driving practices. It has been shown that reductions of 10-20% of fuel are possible without increasing trip times significantly. We conducted this study to understand whether people knew how to drive efficiently, whether they actually ever drove in an efficient manner and what ways there could be to influence people to drive more efficiently. Focus groups were conducted across New Zealand in urban and rural areas with groups of students, young professionals, parents and older people in order to cover different lifestyles and environments. These focus groups covered a wide range of topics including knowledge and practices of efficient driving, learning to drive, infrastructure and aspirations. Our results show that most people reported knowing the things they could do to be more fuel efficient. However, despite this knowledge, they very rarely engaged in these practices. When they did consider fuel efficiency, it was almost always linked to saving fuel costs. Almost no one considered the environmental aspects of driving or fuel use. This shows that there is a clear lack of connection between carbon emissions and driving when people are in their cars. Better messages could be presented to drivers linking their driving practices to carbon emissions and therefore climate change. The findings also showed other areas where more efficient practices and choices could be encouraged, such as advanced driving lessons for new skills, in-car fuel efficiency feedback and better designed public and active transport.

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  • An artifact-centric business process execution platform

    Ngamakeur, Kan; Yongchareon, Dr. Sira; Liesaputra, Veronica; Liu, Chengfei; Yu, Jian (2016-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Artifact-centric modeling has become an alternative, yet promising approach of business process (BP) modeling and management as it provides higher flexibility than that of traditional activity-centric approaches. However, existing BP execution engines require artifact-centric models be transformed to executable activity-centric BP languages (e.g., BPEL) in order to be executed and managed. We argue that the model conversion incurs losses of information and affects traceability and monitoring ability of BPs, especially where BPs span across inter-organizations. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of an execution platform for artifact-centric BPs. We evaluated our platform using a case study and that can demonstrate several key benefits over the use of existing systems to run artifact-centric BPs.

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  • The influence of employees' perceptions on business strategy of small and medium-sized enterprises

    Du Plessis, Andries; Phasinsaksith, Sompaseuth; Fourie, Leon; Sukumaran, Sukesh (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of employees’ perceptions about business strategy in order to identify the factors that contribute to a successful strategy. The research also examines employees’ perceptions about strategy formulation and implementation process of SMEs in Laos, and how these perceptions would affect the outcome of strategy. This research studies the phenomenon by exploring the reality in a scientific way. As a result, this research is based on the positivist paradigm by applying a quantitative research method. The target population of this research is employees of SMEs in Lao PDR, which comprises 100 respondents as the sample size. The findings show that employees who work for profitable SMEs believe business strategy is a key factor that drives superior business performance; certain degrees of interest in business strategy among employees work for SMEs regardless of their gender, age groups, and levels of education; employees who were satisfied with the strategy of their companies performed well in their jobs; and employees who value the formulation process are those who believe in the management system of their companies.

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  • Placing nations' sectoral surpluses and deficits into their global context

    Rankin, Keith (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This statistical presentation builds on previous papers (Rankin 2014a, 2014b) which explore the literature of financial balances. Using current account and general government net lending, the paper analyses private sector and government sector balances for 100 selected countries, including all the major national economies and selections representing the world's regions. This enables us to take a global view of the financial circumstances of national economies, and supra-national regional economies. For any country, domestic and foreign balances must add to zero, an accounting identity. This means that private and government balances combined equal the current account balance. For the world as a whole – a closed financial system – private and government balances add to zero, over any period of time. The world's current account balance is always zero, an accounting identity. In the long run, we would expect to see combined domestic balances in every country approach zero as short-term foreign imbalances resolve through exchange rate mechanisms. This paper uses the period from 1995-2014 as a proxy for the 'recent' long-run, and 2010-14 as the recent post-financial-crisis short run. With governments in many economies seeking to consolidate their fiscal balances in a recent period of private-sector financial caution, accommodations must be found if fiscal targets are to be achieved. The paper investigates which groupings of national economies have provided these accommodations. It notes that, especially over the longer term, New Zealand has an unusually accommodating financial profile.

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