1,375 results for Conference paper

  • Explaining actual online shopping behavior: evidences from two distinct national cultures

    Tan, F. B.; Yan, L.; Urquhart, C. (2010-11-23)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    With increased population of online shoppers, research into online shopping behavior is starting to emerge. Much of the literature has used the technology acceptance model, innovation diffusion theory and the theory of planned behavior to study this phenomenon. This has shed light on the behavior of consumers when they shop online. However, prior research has placed little emphasis on cultural differences in online shopping. Despite wide acknowledgements that the online environment is characterized by a high level of uncertainty and an increasing number of international customers, there are only a few studies that describe how cultural differences may impact on the online shopping behavior of consumers. These have focused on intention to transact and not actual purchasing behaviour. The aim of this paper is to extend prior research by integrating national culture into the theory of planned behavior to better understand actual online shopping behaviour across two cultures. National culture dimensions of long-/short-term orientation and individualism/collectivism are found to have significant effects on both intended and actual behaviours.

    View record details
  • Mood and analyst optimism and accuracy

    Chang, Y; Hsu, W

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Does mood affect prediction performance? When analysts are in a positive (negative) mood, do they make more positively (negatively) biased and less (more) accurate forecasts? This study provides supportive evidence. Specifically, we find that analyst forecasts are more optimistic and have larger errors near holidays, but more pessimistic and have smaller errors when there is a disaster with significant fatalities. We further show that these results are neither driven by sentiment associated with contemporaneous economic or market conditions, nor by under-reaction or over-reaction to more bad news released on days immediately before weekends or holidays.

    View record details
  • Join dependency testing, loomis-whitney join, and triangle enumeration

    Hu, X; Qiao, M; Tao, Y

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Introducing awareness of indigenous knowledge paradigms; IFLA Core Elements

    Lilley, SC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    View record details
  • Ageing in place: The retirement intentions of nurses in New Zealand aged 50 and above

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Aims: The aim of the Late Career Nurse research project was to determine the characteristics of nurses working in New Zealand who were born before 1960; their experiences in the workplace; their perceptions of their health and their retirement intentions. This paper reports on the retirement intentions of regulated nurses aged over 50 in the New Zealand workforce. Background: The mean ages of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged fifty or over (Nursing Council New Zealand 2011) While there is a substantial international literature on the phenomenon and consequences of the ageing nursing workforce, it is unknown whether international experience will predict future nurse behaviour in New Zealand, or how this may impact on nursing workforce modelling or planning. Method: An anonymous on-line survey was emailed to eligible NZNO 1 nurse members over 50 years old in February and March 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3273 responses received were undertaken. Results/findings: New Zealand nursing age demographics have been confirmed and reflected in the respondents to the survey. In concordance with the international literature, good health, access to flexible working options, safe staffing levels and choice of shifts were all very important to older nurses. Evidence of ageism and a bullying culture towards older nurses was reported. Better pay levels were particularly important to younger late career nurses (age 50-55). Specific to New Zealand, lack of retirement funds may delay retirement, and migration to Australia may exacerbate shortages and skill/experience deficits. Conclusions: The New Zealand nursing workforce will be vulnerable to skill and experience shortages if as indicated in this study, 57.2% of nurses aged over 50 retire within the next 10 years, and around 30% within the next 2-5 years. Adoption of measures to ensure better choice of shifts, and continued access to flexible or decreased hours is required, along with less physically demanding work options and roles that recognise and utilise the knowledge, skills and experience of older nurses. These measures have the potential to enable older nurses to continue to contribute for longer to the workforce, albeit on a more part time basis. Better pay, better rostering and safer staffing levels have the potential particularly to reduce the attrition seen in the early to late fifties, and these are urgently advocated. Longer term, access to better retirement planning and financial advice would decrease a considerable source of distress and reduce the numbers of older nurses for whom continuing to work despite ill health is not an option.

    View record details
  • Day 1 Keynote 2: Research and knowledge building on social supervision

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • 'An exhibition model to enable recognition and evaluation of creative works as research in interior design/interior architecture' Conference paper in published proceedings at Interior: A State of Becoming Conference, 2012, Perth, WA, Australia

    Mehzoud, SA; Lawrence, J; Foster, S; Lommerse, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Research ‘through’ design is a becoming’ field, which presents a challenge to designer/researchers. Recently, national research authorities have broadened their parameters to validate creative work in art, architecture and design. This study and the resulting model test the perceived ambiguity of the requirements provided by Australia’s Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) and New Zealand’s Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) for creative works to be recognised as research through exhibition, and proposes a peer-reviewed model for interior design/interior architecture that can provide appropriate quality assurance processes for creative works.

    View record details
  • Capturing the public imagination: Communicating the cultural significance of submarine internet cables

    Holloway-Smith, BR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Popular terms such as “wireless”, “the cloud”, and “cyberspace” have misled public perceptions of internet infrastructure, belying its physical and geographically-bound reality. This can cause problems for the submarine cable industry, particularly when explaining the infrastructure of the internet to uninformed potential investors, regulators, and the public in general. As an independent forum art can be a useful mediator in these situations, enabling shifts in these perceptions of the internet. This paper discusses a range of artworks that present new perspectives on submarine internet cables from outside the industry.

    View record details
  • BRIEF COMMUNICATION: The potential of the New Zealand goat industry

    Carr, AJ; Schreurs; Lopez-Villalobos; Thomas, D; tozer

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The New Zealand goat industry is evolving and there is potential for expansion of its export products. The production and value of the New Zealand goat industry has been explored previously when the industry was in its infancy (Sheppard & O’Donnell 1979), at a time when Mohair production was seen to be ‘the most profitable goat farming enterprise’. Since then major expansion has occurred in the production and export of dairy-goat products, and the production of quality Boer goat meat is under consideration. In order for further progress to be made, knowledge of the current production levels and value of the goat industry, and its potential for expansion is required. Using information describing the current situation of the goat industry (Scholtens et al. 2017) and the value of the goat (Lopez-Lozano et al. 2017), a model was created to estimate the current and potential production and value of the New Zealand goat industry by 2025.

    View record details
  • Is glyphosate-resistant ryegrass resistant to paraquat?

    Ghani Zadeh, H; Harrington, KC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Sequestration of herbicide into vacuoles is considered to be the main mechanism of resistance to both glyphosate and paraquat worldwide. In New Zealand, the first case of glyphosate resistance was found in ryegrass (Lolium) species, and the restricted herbicide translocation was found to be the main mechanism of resistance in the studied populations, presumably through sequestration. Overseas researchers hypothesised that the mechanism responsible for glyphosate resistance could also cause resistance to paraquat. We examined this hypothesis by comparing a known glyphosate-resistant population of perennial ryegrass with a known susceptible population after spraying with different rates (25–800 g ai/ha) of paraquat. The glyphosate-resistant population responded similarly to the susceptible population at the different rates of paraquat application. This result suggests that the restricted glyphosate translocation mechanism does not necessarily lead to paraquat resistance. These results also suggest that paraquat could be useful for controlling ryegrass when glyphosate resistance has evolved and the application of paraquat is permitted.

    View record details
  • Which way forward in the quest for drought tolerance in perennial ryegrass

    Matthew, C; van der Linden, A; Hussain, S; Easton, HS; Hatier, JHB; Horne, DJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Evaluation of sorghum, sudan-grass and pearl millet cultivars in Manawatu

    Millner, JP; Silungwe, D; McGill, CR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Sorghum, sudan-grass and pearl millet are versatile summer forages able to be grazed or conserved as silage. However, there is little recently published information on the performance these crops in New Zealand. A trial was carried out at Massey University, Palmerston North, to compare forage yields and crop morphology of four sorghum x sudan-grass hybrids (Pac 8421, Pac 8423, Pacific BMR and Bettagraze), two sudan-grass (Superdan 2 and Sprint) and one pearl millet (Nutrifeed) cultivars sown on the 8 and 21 December 2009. At final harvest, 57 and 58 days after sowing for the first and second sowing dates respectively, dry matter yields decreased (P<0.001) higher than in the second sowing (1.8) and was influenced by cultivar.

    View record details
  • Understanding the ineffectiveness of Cu and Zn in reducing urea hydrolysis losses from grazed dairy pasture soils

    Adhikari, KP; Saggar, S; Hanly, JA; Guinto, DF

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Real Exchange Rates and Sectoral Productivity in the Eurozone

    Berka, M; Devereux, M; Engel, C

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We investigate the link between real exchange rates and sectoral total factor productivity measures for countries in the Eurozone. Real exchange rate patterns quite closely accord with an amended Balassa-Samuelson interpretation both in the cross-section and time series. We use a sticky price dynamic general equilibrium model to generate a cross-section and time series of real exchange rates that can be compared to the data. Under the assumption of a common currency, the model simulations closely accord with the empirical estimates for the Eurozone. Our findings contrast with previous studies that have found little relationship between productivity levels and the real exchange rate among high-income countries, but those studies have included country pairs which have a floating nominal exchange rate.

    View record details
  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • A mixed picture: the experiences of overseas trained nurses in New Zealand

    Walker, LA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Ageing in place: retirement intentions of New Zealand nurses aged 50+.

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

    View record details
  • Complex Network Visualizations As A Means Of Generative Research In Design

    Murnieks, AC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The search for a possible design question, or generative research, is problematic. Generative research in design often relies on an unseen, intangible spark of intuition that leads to a novel design approach, and not many scholars or clients appreciate (or trust) the abstract nature of this process. Gathering information like demographics is useful data, but it only provides comparative information. Though charts and graphs can make apparent what is already true in the num- bers, they cannot reveal much more than that. They cannot, for example, reflect how a user population behaves, interacts, socializes, or moves. Consequently, the ways in which we navigate our world though visual communication, electronic or otherwise, is an increasingly challenging design problem. Seeing clear patterns for behavior is especially important in interaction design. Visual representations of pattern phenomena are possible with network science. The United States National Research Council defines network science as “the study of network representations of physical, biological, and social phenomena leading to predictive models of these phenomena.” (Wikipedia, 2013). Most visualizations of complex networks are literally represented as lines connecting dots, the dots as data points and the lines as relationships. Careful- ly choosing the best data points, based on meaningful relationships, and applying good information design technique, makes a more comprehensive view of a designated design problem possible. A network visualization can be dynamic and three dimensional, though meaningful compositional view of a two-dimensional model can suffice. Because the data are visual, design decisions are more clearly communicated to both the designer and her audience. While it is possible to analyze the complex network with various mathematical functions—like density, clustering and connectedness—through these types of visualizations, a few simple examples show how powerful network science models can be.

    View record details
  • A study of Rubi/Furigana functions: Spectrum between a translation type and a pragmatic type

    Nakamura, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    This is part of an on-going project about the comprehensive understanding of uses of Rubi/Furigana taxonomy in the writing system of modern Japanese. Rubi/Furigana is a small typed script on the top of Chinese characters, the basic function of which is a supportive tool for readers about how to read Chinese characters in a text or sometimes is used as a gloss such as for telling what kind of meanings Chinese characters have. The paper will present different uses of Rubi/Furigana from the basic reading function and attempt to make a new taxonomy of Rubi/Furigana functions. For example, as a creative use, Rubi/Furigana sometimes has a different reading from its original reading of Chinese characters. In that case, we can observe borrowing sounds from English along with the Chinese characters or synonymous meaning sounds on the Chinese characters such as using dialects instead of standard readings or personal pronouns on Chinese characters of person names. The research is based on a cognitive semantic approach, which can describe those unconventional uses of Rubi/Furigana as construal alternatives different from the basic reading. Translation analysis is also utilized for the pragmatic categorizations of the gaps between an original meaning of Rubi/Furigana and creative uses of Rubi/Furigana. So far, in my research, I have identified five types of uses of Rubi/Furigana. Among them, this paper will focus on the difference between translation type of Rubi/Furigana and pragmatic type of Rubi/Furigana and describe it as a continuum of their categories. The main data will be taken from a translation of ‘The Great Gatsby’ by Murakami Haruki and the comic ‘Shingeki no Kyojin’ (Attack on Titian).

    View record details
  • A review of the use of chicory plantain red clover and white clover in a sward mix for increased sheep and beef production

    Cranston, LM; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Kemp, PD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Many farmers are sowing mixed swards containing chicory (Cichorium intybus), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and white clover (T. repens) (hereafter termed herb and clover mix). This herb and clover mix has comparable annual dry matter (DM) production to perennial ryegrass white clover pasture (rye/wc), however, it has a different pattern of growth, producing more DM during summer and autumn. The herb and clover mix also has a higher nutritive value and is able to support greater rates of animal production, especially over summer, than rye/ wc in both sheep and cattle. The herb and clover mix is most suited to a rotational grazing interval of 3–4 weeks to an 8 cm residual height, with no winter grazing. When managed appropriately the herb and clover mix is able to persist for at least 2 years and up to 5 years under both sheep and cattle grazing.

    View record details