1,422 results for Conference paper

  • What do we teach them when we don't know what it will look like

    Tait, Robert (2017-07-11T00:07:38Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It has taken forty years for sustainability to become mainstream. Forty years ago the publication of ‘Limits to Growth’ forecast a collapse somewhere between 2010 and 2075. Our students are staring this in the face. The resources of the Earth are finite and the economic theories driving our economies are finite. We do not know what form business will take. This paper looks at embedding sustainability into building trade related diploma and bachelor qualifications at Unitec. A sound base of fundamental building skills must be augmented with an understanding of ecological and technological skills. The traditional apprenticeship model, practice based and learning on the job supported with MOOCs. Sustainability of buildings requires a building to be flexible in use and for longevity, built to a good standard. The main piece of legislation controlling this industry in New Zealand has in section 3 a purpose requiring ‘sustainable building’. The traditional business model requires a profit and profit is only achieved in a growth model economy. There is only one planet and our industrial model uses one and a half, even more in some western countries. We are using our resources at an unsustainable rate and there is a case here for education to lead the industry. Sixty percent of the buildings standing in 2050 are already in place. There is a worldwide population shift to urban environments and our students will live in these buildings. They will need the skills to determine what they want. The Built Environment uses 40% of the world’s energy and there is a high possibility of being able to reduce that. Future practitioners obtain the knowledge through their learning. The discussion will be around how this is done in the ‘classroom’ and some of the interesting results achieved.

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  • Portability of an RF fingerprint of a wireless transmitter

    Rehman, Saeed; Sowerby, K.; Alam, S.; Ardekani, Iman (2017-07-11T00:07:37Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In conventional wireless networks, security issues are primarily considered above the physical layer and are usually based on bitlevel algorithms to establish the identity of a legitimate wireless device. Physical layer security is a new paradigm in which features extracted from an analog signal can be used to establish the unique identity of a transmitter. Our previous research work into RF fingerprinting has shown that every transmitter has a unique RF fingerprint owing to imperfections in the analog components present in the RF front end. Generally, it is believed that the RF fingerprint of a specific transmitter is same across all receivers. That is, a fingerprint created in one receiver can be transported to another receiver to establish the identity of a transmitter. However, to the best of the author’s knowledge, no such example is available in the literature in which an RF fingerprint generated in one receiver is used for identification in other receivers. This paper presents the results of experiments, and analyzing the feasibility of using an universal RF fingerprint of a transmitter for identification across different receivers.

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  • Mood and analyst optimism and accuracy

    Chang, Y; Hsu, W

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Does mood affect prediction performance? When analysts are in a positive (negative) mood, do they make more positively (negatively) biased and less (more) accurate forecasts? This study provides supportive evidence. Specifically, we find that analyst forecasts are more optimistic and have larger errors near holidays, but more pessimistic and have smaller errors when there is a disaster with significant fatalities. We further show that these results are neither driven by sentiment associated with contemporaneous economic or market conditions, nor by under-reaction or over-reaction to more bad news released on days immediately before weekends or holidays.

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  • Join dependency testing, loomis-whitney join, and triangle enumeration

    Hu, X; Qiao, M; Tao, Y

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Introducing awareness of indigenous knowledge paradigms; IFLA Core Elements

    Lilley, SC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Ageing in place: The retirement intentions of nurses in New Zealand aged 50 and above

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Aims: The aim of the Late Career Nurse research project was to determine the characteristics of nurses working in New Zealand who were born before 1960; their experiences in the workplace; their perceptions of their health and their retirement intentions. This paper reports on the retirement intentions of regulated nurses aged over 50 in the New Zealand workforce. Background: The mean ages of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged fifty or over (Nursing Council New Zealand 2011) While there is a substantial international literature on the phenomenon and consequences of the ageing nursing workforce, it is unknown whether international experience will predict future nurse behaviour in New Zealand, or how this may impact on nursing workforce modelling or planning. Method: An anonymous on-line survey was emailed to eligible NZNO 1 nurse members over 50 years old in February and March 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3273 responses received were undertaken. Results/findings: New Zealand nursing age demographics have been confirmed and reflected in the respondents to the survey. In concordance with the international literature, good health, access to flexible working options, safe staffing levels and choice of shifts were all very important to older nurses. Evidence of ageism and a bullying culture towards older nurses was reported. Better pay levels were particularly important to younger late career nurses (age 50-55). Specific to New Zealand, lack of retirement funds may delay retirement, and migration to Australia may exacerbate shortages and skill/experience deficits. Conclusions: The New Zealand nursing workforce will be vulnerable to skill and experience shortages if as indicated in this study, 57.2% of nurses aged over 50 retire within the next 10 years, and around 30% within the next 2-5 years. Adoption of measures to ensure better choice of shifts, and continued access to flexible or decreased hours is required, along with less physically demanding work options and roles that recognise and utilise the knowledge, skills and experience of older nurses. These measures have the potential to enable older nurses to continue to contribute for longer to the workforce, albeit on a more part time basis. Better pay, better rostering and safer staffing levels have the potential particularly to reduce the attrition seen in the early to late fifties, and these are urgently advocated. Longer term, access to better retirement planning and financial advice would decrease a considerable source of distress and reduce the numbers of older nurses for whom continuing to work despite ill health is not an option.

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  • Day 1 Keynote 2: Research and knowledge building on social supervision

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Capturing the public imagination: Communicating the cultural significance of submarine internet cables

    Holloway-Smith, BR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Popular terms such as “wireless”, “the cloud”, and “cyberspace” have misled public perceptions of internet infrastructure, belying its physical and geographically-bound reality. This can cause problems for the submarine cable industry, particularly when explaining the infrastructure of the internet to uninformed potential investors, regulators, and the public in general. As an independent forum art can be a useful mediator in these situations, enabling shifts in these perceptions of the internet. This paper discusses a range of artworks that present new perspectives on submarine internet cables from outside the industry.

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  • Is glyphosate-resistant ryegrass resistant to paraquat?

    Ghani Zadeh, H; Harrington, KC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Sequestration of herbicide into vacuoles is considered to be the main mechanism of resistance to both glyphosate and paraquat worldwide. In New Zealand, the first case of glyphosate resistance was found in ryegrass (Lolium) species, and the restricted herbicide translocation was found to be the main mechanism of resistance in the studied populations, presumably through sequestration. Overseas researchers hypothesised that the mechanism responsible for glyphosate resistance could also cause resistance to paraquat. We examined this hypothesis by comparing a known glyphosate-resistant population of perennial ryegrass with a known susceptible population after spraying with different rates (25–800 g ai/ha) of paraquat. The glyphosate-resistant population responded similarly to the susceptible population at the different rates of paraquat application. This result suggests that the restricted glyphosate translocation mechanism does not necessarily lead to paraquat resistance. These results also suggest that paraquat could be useful for controlling ryegrass when glyphosate resistance has evolved and the application of paraquat is permitted.

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  • Which way forward in the quest for drought tolerance in perennial ryegrass

    Matthew, C; van der Linden, A; Hussain, S; Easton, HS; Hatier, JHB; Horne, DJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Understanding the ineffectiveness of Cu and Zn in reducing urea hydrolysis losses from grazed dairy pasture soils

    Adhikari, KP; Saggar, S; Hanly, JA; Guinto, DF

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Real Exchange Rates and Sectoral Productivity in the Eurozone

    Berka, M; Devereux, M; Engel, C

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We investigate the link between real exchange rates and sectoral total factor productivity measures for countries in the Eurozone. Real exchange rate patterns quite closely accord with an amended Balassa-Samuelson interpretation both in the cross-section and time series. We use a sticky price dynamic general equilibrium model to generate a cross-section and time series of real exchange rates that can be compared to the data. Under the assumption of a common currency, the model simulations closely accord with the empirical estimates for the Eurozone. Our findings contrast with previous studies that have found little relationship between productivity levels and the real exchange rate among high-income countries, but those studies have included country pairs which have a floating nominal exchange rate.

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  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • A mixed picture: the experiences of overseas trained nurses in New Zealand

    Walker, LA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Ageing in place: retirement intentions of New Zealand nurses aged 50+.

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • A study of Rubi/Furigana functions: Spectrum between a translation type and a pragmatic type

    Nakamura, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    This is part of an on-going project about the comprehensive understanding of uses of Rubi/Furigana taxonomy in the writing system of modern Japanese. Rubi/Furigana is a small typed script on the top of Chinese characters, the basic function of which is a supportive tool for readers about how to read Chinese characters in a text or sometimes is used as a gloss such as for telling what kind of meanings Chinese characters have. The paper will present different uses of Rubi/Furigana from the basic reading function and attempt to make a new taxonomy of Rubi/Furigana functions. For example, as a creative use, Rubi/Furigana sometimes has a different reading from its original reading of Chinese characters. In that case, we can observe borrowing sounds from English along with the Chinese characters or synonymous meaning sounds on the Chinese characters such as using dialects instead of standard readings or personal pronouns on Chinese characters of person names. The research is based on a cognitive semantic approach, which can describe those unconventional uses of Rubi/Furigana as construal alternatives different from the basic reading. Translation analysis is also utilized for the pragmatic categorizations of the gaps between an original meaning of Rubi/Furigana and creative uses of Rubi/Furigana. So far, in my research, I have identified five types of uses of Rubi/Furigana. Among them, this paper will focus on the difference between translation type of Rubi/Furigana and pragmatic type of Rubi/Furigana and describe it as a continuum of their categories. The main data will be taken from a translation of ‘The Great Gatsby’ by Murakami Haruki and the comic ‘Shingeki no Kyojin’ (Attack on Titian).

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  • A review of the use of chicory plantain red clover and white clover in a sward mix for increased sheep and beef production

    Cranston, LM; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Kemp, PD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Many farmers are sowing mixed swards containing chicory (Cichorium intybus), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and white clover (T. repens) (hereafter termed herb and clover mix). This herb and clover mix has comparable annual dry matter (DM) production to perennial ryegrass white clover pasture (rye/wc), however, it has a different pattern of growth, producing more DM during summer and autumn. The herb and clover mix also has a higher nutritive value and is able to support greater rates of animal production, especially over summer, than rye/ wc in both sheep and cattle. The herb and clover mix is most suited to a rotational grazing interval of 3–4 weeks to an 8 cm residual height, with no winter grazing. When managed appropriately the herb and clover mix is able to persist for at least 2 years and up to 5 years under both sheep and cattle grazing.

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  • Proceedings of the 5th Joint Australian and New Zealand Soil Science Conference: Soil solutions for diverse landscapes

    [Authors]

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Meat proteolysis by pepsin highlighted by maldi imaging mass spectrometry

    Theron, L; Venien, A; Boland, MJ; Kaur, L; Loison, O; Chambon, C; Sante-Lhoutellier, V; Astruc, T

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The aim of this study was to highlight the in situ hydrolysis of proteins to peptides on a muscle tissue section. In this context, a bovine muscle was incubated in a pepsin solution, cryofixed and sectioned. MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) Mass spectrometry imaging was used to obtain the ionic map of proteins directly on the muscle section. This method allowed us to localize the appearance and disappearance of proteins or fragments of proteins. The results give new insights into the mechanisms of enzyme action within muscle structure.

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  • Mitigation of ammonia losses from urea applied to a pastoral system: The effect of nBTPT and timing and amount of irrigation

    Zaman, M; Saggar, SK; Stafford, AD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    To investigate the effect of applying urea with or without the urease inhibitor (UI) N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (nBTPT – trade name Agrotain®) and to assess impact of the amount and timing of irrigation on subsequent ammonia (NH3 ) emission, a field trial was set up on a research farm at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand in December 2012. Measurements of the daily NH3 emission showed that majority of NH3 losses occurred during the first 1–3 days following urea application. Delaying irrigation for 48 hr post urea application resulted in high average NH3 -N losses, at 23% and 28.3% for urea applied at 30 and 60 kg N ha-1, respectively. However, even when 5 or 10 mm of irrigation was applied 8 hours after urea application, average NH3 losses were still 11.3% and 14.4% of the N applied at 30 and 60 kg N ha-1, respectively. Our results suggest that 5 to 10 mm of irrigation/rainfall is needed very soon (<8 hr) after urea application to supress NH3 volatilisation depending on initial soil moisture contents. If this rainfall/irrigation is not guaranteed, then NH3 losses associated with standard urea application can effectively be reduced by 47% using urea treated with nBTPT.

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