1,415 results for Conference paper

  • People as a source of competitive advantage during recruitment and retention of senior managers in financial services sectors in Laos

    Du Plessis, Andries; Sumphonphakdy, S.; Oldfield, James; Marriott, Jeff (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The focus of this research paper is to identify the importance of recruiting and retaining of senior management resources in the banking industry in Laos. This paper reports on some of the findings. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used to collect data from three main banks in Laos. Interview section: the questions were designed to explore participants’ understanding of basic concepts of HRM and perspectives towards HRM in their organisations about recruitment and retention. Questionnaire section: part one involves the demographics data, while part two of the survey questions are focused on participants’ attitudes towards HRM processes such as recruitment in their organisations. The findings of the study demonstrate that HRM plays a critically important role in their banks in terms of keeping their competitive advantage. There is a lack of development and implementation of HRM practices and policies to recruit and retain the right people.

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  • Portability of an RF Fingerprint of a Wireless Transmitter

    Rehman, Saeed; Burki, Shafiq; Ardekani, Iman (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In conventional wireless networks, security issues are primarily considered above the physical layer and are usually based on bit-level algorithms to establish the identity of a legitimate wireless device. Physical layer security is a new paradigm in which features extracted from an analog signal can be used to establish the unique identity of a transmitter. Our previous research work into RF fingerprinting has shown that every transmitter has a unique RF fingerprint owing to imperfections in the analog components present in the RF front end. Generally, it is believed that the RF fingerprint of a specific transmitter is same across all receivers. That is, a fingerprint created in one receiver can be transported to another receiver to establish the identity of a transmitter. However, to the best of the author’s knowledge, no such example is available in the literature in which an RF fingerprint generated in one receiver is used for identification in other receivers. This paper presents the results of experiments, and analyzing the feasibility of using an universal RF fingerprint of a transmitter for identification across different receivers.

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  • An investigation into employees' satisfaction regarding leadership styles in the Laos banking sector

    Nel, Pieter; Vongphanakhone, Suksavanh; Sukumaran, Sukesh (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Leadership is one of the key management functions which enable an organisation to sustain its competitive advantage develop both its employees and organisational outcomes and has a direct impact on the performance and motivation of employees. This study identified practical leadership styles that the banking sector in Laos should apply to improve employee performance and motivation to provide better service to clients. The results based on 116 useable questionnaires revealed that poor leadership management is one of the key reasons that affect the performance and motivation of staff. It is recommended that leaders should apply four leadership styles, namely authentic, transformational, charismatic and participative. Using these leadership styles will perhaps lead to improved employee performance and motivation at work

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  • iBus: Perceptions of the rise of mobile learning in a business degree

    Oldfield, James; Dassanayake, Wajira; Kearns, Nick (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Wireless mobile devices (WMD) introduced in the first year of a tertiary business education programme at a tertiary institute in Auckland gave students the opportunity to experience mobile authentic learning as part of an initiative called iBus. Students were provided course material in an interactive iBook format, encouraged to engage in collaboration through authentic activities and utilised the device’s capability for a range of study related tasks. Their responses to this experience were recorded by anonymous online survey at the end of the semester. Responses were positive with high use rates recorded for students accessing course material (91% used ibooks) and lower yet positive rates (67%) for interactive use of the WMD in class. This paper reports on the initiative to date and the feedback provided by students on its impact upon their learning experience.

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  • An Alternative Approach for Developing Socially Assistive Robots

    Jayawardena, Chandimal; Kuo, I-Han; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper presents the design of the socially assistive companion robotic wheelchair named RoboChair. Unlike in most current companion robotics projects, the approach of RoboChair is not to build a completely new robotic device. Instead, the focus of the RoboChair project is to convert an already useful device (i.e. wheelchair) to a socially assistive companion robot. The authors argue that there are number of advantages in this approach. The proposed robotic chair is a mobile robot that can carry a person. It is equipped with several measuring devices for measuring vital signs. The robot chair is capable of engaging users with interactive dialogs through a touch screen and by using human-robot interaction techniques. It has a scalable modular software architecture so that adding new hardware and software modules is straightforward. The software frame- work is based on Robot Operating System (ROS) open source robotic middleware.

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  • Enhancing Children's Numeracy & Te Reo Skills using Computer Games

    Nand, Kalpana; Baghaei, Nilufar; Casey, John (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The use of computer games as common vehicles for education, as opposed to pure entertainment, has gained immense popularity in recent years. In our earlier work, we investigated the appealing characteristics of engaging computer games for children and designed an educational tool based on those characteristics. In this paper, we present the results of a study conducted with 120 primary school children, in which two versions of our proposed educational tool (features enriched vs feature devoid) were used for four weeks to teach primary school curriculum areas of Numeracy and Te Reo Maori language. The effectiveness of the educational tool was measured using a pre-test and a post-test, as well as other indicators such as subjective analysis, the frequency and duration of time on playing the game. We found that the features enriched game enhanced children’s learning in both Numeracy and Te Reo curriculum areas more than the feature devoid version. In the case of Numeracy, the increase in scores was twice as much as the feature devoid version and in the case of Te Reo it was five times as much. Finally, the results of the subjective analysis showed that the feature enriched game was more popular with children – the test group indicated that they enjoyed playing the game more than the participants in the control group and are more likely to recommend it to their friends. The results also showed that the sound effects, the visual effects, the level of challenges in the game and the feedback messages contributed more to their engagement.

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  • International collaborations in student-centered mobile moviemaking : combining online tools for an innovative global pedagogy

    Wagner, Daniel (2017-07-11T00:07:33Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In the last few short years, interconnectivity has brought about new levels of artistic collaboration. Businesses, schools and artists alike are now engaging in multimedia remote collaboration as a matter of course. The next generation of filmmakers, for example, will surely involve an ever-greater degree of remote collaboration, as more teams work together on projects across the planet. There are now many choices of tools and platforms available to link the world through connected devices. How these tools are strategically employed can mean the difference between a smooth, successful collaboration and one that’s fallen short of its potential for full member involvement. So...is there such thing as a perfect recipe for an engaging international collaboration? This paper examines one evolving case study in international collaboration within an educational context, parsing the choices made and measuring them against student uptake and involvement. Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen (ELVSS) is an evolving experiment in remote collaboration by international student teams collectively making movies on their mobile phones. As the ELVSS project has expanded and grown more complex since its inception in 2011, so have the lessons to be learned from it. What light can this globally collaborative effort shed on all future international collaborations, particularly ones involving mobile moviemaking? To what extent did the combination of smart phones and Web 2.0 platforms assist or impede fluid communication, seamless workflow and creative contribution amongst the huge cohort? What were its successes, what were its lessons? How can we continue to improve the pedagogy of collaborative practice in mobile moviemaking?

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  • What do we teach them when we don't know what it will look like

    Tait, Robert (2017-07-11T00:07:38Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It has taken forty years for sustainability to become mainstream. Forty years ago the publication of ‘Limits to Growth’ forecast a collapse somewhere between 2010 and 2075. Our students are staring this in the face. The resources of the Earth are finite and the economic theories driving our economies are finite. We do not know what form business will take. This paper looks at embedding sustainability into building trade related diploma and bachelor qualifications at Unitec. A sound base of fundamental building skills must be augmented with an understanding of ecological and technological skills. The traditional apprenticeship model, practice based and learning on the job supported with MOOCs. Sustainability of buildings requires a building to be flexible in use and for longevity, built to a good standard. The main piece of legislation controlling this industry in New Zealand has in section 3 a purpose requiring ‘sustainable building’. The traditional business model requires a profit and profit is only achieved in a growth model economy. There is only one planet and our industrial model uses one and a half, even more in some western countries. We are using our resources at an unsustainable rate and there is a case here for education to lead the industry. Sixty percent of the buildings standing in 2050 are already in place. There is a worldwide population shift to urban environments and our students will live in these buildings. They will need the skills to determine what they want. The Built Environment uses 40% of the world’s energy and there is a high possibility of being able to reduce that. Future practitioners obtain the knowledge through their learning. The discussion will be around how this is done in the ‘classroom’ and some of the interesting results achieved.

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  • Portability of an RF fingerprint of a wireless transmitter

    Rehman, Saeed; Sowerby, K.; Alam, S.; Ardekani, Iman (2017-07-11T00:07:37Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In conventional wireless networks, security issues are primarily considered above the physical layer and are usually based on bitlevel algorithms to establish the identity of a legitimate wireless device. Physical layer security is a new paradigm in which features extracted from an analog signal can be used to establish the unique identity of a transmitter. Our previous research work into RF fingerprinting has shown that every transmitter has a unique RF fingerprint owing to imperfections in the analog components present in the RF front end. Generally, it is believed that the RF fingerprint of a specific transmitter is same across all receivers. That is, a fingerprint created in one receiver can be transported to another receiver to establish the identity of a transmitter. However, to the best of the author’s knowledge, no such example is available in the literature in which an RF fingerprint generated in one receiver is used for identification in other receivers. This paper presents the results of experiments, and analyzing the feasibility of using an universal RF fingerprint of a transmitter for identification across different receivers.

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  • Mood and analyst optimism and accuracy

    Chang, Y; Hsu, W

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Does mood affect prediction performance? When analysts are in a positive (negative) mood, do they make more positively (negatively) biased and less (more) accurate forecasts? This study provides supportive evidence. Specifically, we find that analyst forecasts are more optimistic and have larger errors near holidays, but more pessimistic and have smaller errors when there is a disaster with significant fatalities. We further show that these results are neither driven by sentiment associated with contemporaneous economic or market conditions, nor by under-reaction or over-reaction to more bad news released on days immediately before weekends or holidays.

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  • Join dependency testing, loomis-whitney join, and triangle enumeration

    Hu, X; Qiao, M; Tao, Y

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Introducing awareness of indigenous knowledge paradigms; IFLA Core Elements

    Lilley, SC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Ageing in place: The retirement intentions of nurses in New Zealand aged 50 and above

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Aims: The aim of the Late Career Nurse research project was to determine the characteristics of nurses working in New Zealand who were born before 1960; their experiences in the workplace; their perceptions of their health and their retirement intentions. This paper reports on the retirement intentions of regulated nurses aged over 50 in the New Zealand workforce. Background: The mean ages of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged fifty or over (Nursing Council New Zealand 2011) While there is a substantial international literature on the phenomenon and consequences of the ageing nursing workforce, it is unknown whether international experience will predict future nurse behaviour in New Zealand, or how this may impact on nursing workforce modelling or planning. Method: An anonymous on-line survey was emailed to eligible NZNO 1 nurse members over 50 years old in February and March 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3273 responses received were undertaken. Results/findings: New Zealand nursing age demographics have been confirmed and reflected in the respondents to the survey. In concordance with the international literature, good health, access to flexible working options, safe staffing levels and choice of shifts were all very important to older nurses. Evidence of ageism and a bullying culture towards older nurses was reported. Better pay levels were particularly important to younger late career nurses (age 50-55). Specific to New Zealand, lack of retirement funds may delay retirement, and migration to Australia may exacerbate shortages and skill/experience deficits. Conclusions: The New Zealand nursing workforce will be vulnerable to skill and experience shortages if as indicated in this study, 57.2% of nurses aged over 50 retire within the next 10 years, and around 30% within the next 2-5 years. Adoption of measures to ensure better choice of shifts, and continued access to flexible or decreased hours is required, along with less physically demanding work options and roles that recognise and utilise the knowledge, skills and experience of older nurses. These measures have the potential to enable older nurses to continue to contribute for longer to the workforce, albeit on a more part time basis. Better pay, better rostering and safer staffing levels have the potential particularly to reduce the attrition seen in the early to late fifties, and these are urgently advocated. Longer term, access to better retirement planning and financial advice would decrease a considerable source of distress and reduce the numbers of older nurses for whom continuing to work despite ill health is not an option.

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  • Day 1 Keynote 2: Research and knowledge building on social supervision

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Capturing the public imagination: Communicating the cultural significance of submarine internet cables

    Holloway-Smith, BR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Popular terms such as “wireless”, “the cloud”, and “cyberspace” have misled public perceptions of internet infrastructure, belying its physical and geographically-bound reality. This can cause problems for the submarine cable industry, particularly when explaining the infrastructure of the internet to uninformed potential investors, regulators, and the public in general. As an independent forum art can be a useful mediator in these situations, enabling shifts in these perceptions of the internet. This paper discusses a range of artworks that present new perspectives on submarine internet cables from outside the industry.

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  • Is glyphosate-resistant ryegrass resistant to paraquat?

    Ghani Zadeh, H; Harrington, KC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Sequestration of herbicide into vacuoles is considered to be the main mechanism of resistance to both glyphosate and paraquat worldwide. In New Zealand, the first case of glyphosate resistance was found in ryegrass (Lolium) species, and the restricted herbicide translocation was found to be the main mechanism of resistance in the studied populations, presumably through sequestration. Overseas researchers hypothesised that the mechanism responsible for glyphosate resistance could also cause resistance to paraquat. We examined this hypothesis by comparing a known glyphosate-resistant population of perennial ryegrass with a known susceptible population after spraying with different rates (25–800 g ai/ha) of paraquat. The glyphosate-resistant population responded similarly to the susceptible population at the different rates of paraquat application. This result suggests that the restricted glyphosate translocation mechanism does not necessarily lead to paraquat resistance. These results also suggest that paraquat could be useful for controlling ryegrass when glyphosate resistance has evolved and the application of paraquat is permitted.

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  • A 'Good Employer' perceptions and practice in small enterprises

    Coetzee, DT; Foster, AB; Laird, I

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Which way forward in the quest for drought tolerance in perennial ryegrass

    Matthew, C; van der Linden, A; Hussain, S; Easton, HS; Hatier, JHB; Horne, DJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Understanding the ineffectiveness of Cu and Zn in reducing urea hydrolysis losses from grazed dairy pasture soils

    Adhikari, KP; Saggar, S; Hanly, JA; Guinto, DF

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Real Exchange Rates and Sectoral Productivity in the Eurozone

    Berka, M; Devereux, M; Engel, C

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We investigate the link between real exchange rates and sectoral total factor productivity measures for countries in the Eurozone. Real exchange rate patterns quite closely accord with an amended Balassa-Samuelson interpretation both in the cross-section and time series. We use a sticky price dynamic general equilibrium model to generate a cross-section and time series of real exchange rates that can be compared to the data. Under the assumption of a common currency, the model simulations closely accord with the empirical estimates for the Eurozone. Our findings contrast with previous studies that have found little relationship between productivity levels and the real exchange rate among high-income countries, but those studies have included country pairs which have a floating nominal exchange rate.

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