1,375 results for Conference paper

  • Understanding the ineffectiveness of Cu and Zn in reducing urea hydrolysis losses from grazed dairy pasture soils

    Adhikari, KP; Saggar, S; Hanly, JA; Guinto, DF

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Real Exchange Rates and Sectoral Productivity in the Eurozone

    Berka, M; Devereux, M; Engel, C

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We investigate the link between real exchange rates and sectoral total factor productivity measures for countries in the Eurozone. Real exchange rate patterns quite closely accord with an amended Balassa-Samuelson interpretation both in the cross-section and time series. We use a sticky price dynamic general equilibrium model to generate a cross-section and time series of real exchange rates that can be compared to the data. Under the assumption of a common currency, the model simulations closely accord with the empirical estimates for the Eurozone. Our findings contrast with previous studies that have found little relationship between productivity levels and the real exchange rate among high-income countries, but those studies have included country pairs which have a floating nominal exchange rate.

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  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • A mixed picture: the experiences of overseas trained nurses in New Zealand

    Walker, LA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Ageing in place: retirement intentions of New Zealand nurses aged 50+.

    Walker, LA; Clendon, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Complex Network Visualizations As A Means Of Generative Research In Design

    Murnieks, AC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The search for a possible design question, or generative research, is problematic. Generative research in design often relies on an unseen, intangible spark of intuition that leads to a novel design approach, and not many scholars or clients appreciate (or trust) the abstract nature of this process. Gathering information like demographics is useful data, but it only provides comparative information. Though charts and graphs can make apparent what is already true in the num- bers, they cannot reveal much more than that. They cannot, for example, reflect how a user population behaves, interacts, socializes, or moves. Consequently, the ways in which we navigate our world though visual communication, electronic or otherwise, is an increasingly challenging design problem. Seeing clear patterns for behavior is especially important in interaction design. Visual representations of pattern phenomena are possible with network science. The United States National Research Council defines network science as “the study of network representations of physical, biological, and social phenomena leading to predictive models of these phenomena.” (Wikipedia, 2013). Most visualizations of complex networks are literally represented as lines connecting dots, the dots as data points and the lines as relationships. Careful- ly choosing the best data points, based on meaningful relationships, and applying good information design technique, makes a more comprehensive view of a designated design problem possible. A network visualization can be dynamic and three dimensional, though meaningful compositional view of a two-dimensional model can suffice. Because the data are visual, design decisions are more clearly communicated to both the designer and her audience. While it is possible to analyze the complex network with various mathematical functions—like density, clustering and connectedness—through these types of visualizations, a few simple examples show how powerful network science models can be.

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  • A study of Rubi/Furigana functions: Spectrum between a translation type and a pragmatic type

    Nakamura, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    This is part of an on-going project about the comprehensive understanding of uses of Rubi/Furigana taxonomy in the writing system of modern Japanese. Rubi/Furigana is a small typed script on the top of Chinese characters, the basic function of which is a supportive tool for readers about how to read Chinese characters in a text or sometimes is used as a gloss such as for telling what kind of meanings Chinese characters have. The paper will present different uses of Rubi/Furigana from the basic reading function and attempt to make a new taxonomy of Rubi/Furigana functions. For example, as a creative use, Rubi/Furigana sometimes has a different reading from its original reading of Chinese characters. In that case, we can observe borrowing sounds from English along with the Chinese characters or synonymous meaning sounds on the Chinese characters such as using dialects instead of standard readings or personal pronouns on Chinese characters of person names. The research is based on a cognitive semantic approach, which can describe those unconventional uses of Rubi/Furigana as construal alternatives different from the basic reading. Translation analysis is also utilized for the pragmatic categorizations of the gaps between an original meaning of Rubi/Furigana and creative uses of Rubi/Furigana. So far, in my research, I have identified five types of uses of Rubi/Furigana. Among them, this paper will focus on the difference between translation type of Rubi/Furigana and pragmatic type of Rubi/Furigana and describe it as a continuum of their categories. The main data will be taken from a translation of ‘The Great Gatsby’ by Murakami Haruki and the comic ‘Shingeki no Kyojin’ (Attack on Titian).

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  • A review of the use of chicory plantain red clover and white clover in a sward mix for increased sheep and beef production

    Cranston, LM; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Kemp, PD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Many farmers are sowing mixed swards containing chicory (Cichorium intybus), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and white clover (T. repens) (hereafter termed herb and clover mix). This herb and clover mix has comparable annual dry matter (DM) production to perennial ryegrass white clover pasture (rye/wc), however, it has a different pattern of growth, producing more DM during summer and autumn. The herb and clover mix also has a higher nutritive value and is able to support greater rates of animal production, especially over summer, than rye/ wc in both sheep and cattle. The herb and clover mix is most suited to a rotational grazing interval of 3–4 weeks to an 8 cm residual height, with no winter grazing. When managed appropriately the herb and clover mix is able to persist for at least 2 years and up to 5 years under both sheep and cattle grazing.

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  • Proceedings of the 5th Joint Australian and New Zealand Soil Science Conference: Soil solutions for diverse landscapes

    [Authors]

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Connecting With Users Though Interactive Prototyping: Understanding User Behavior Through Building The Black Box And Its Electronic Innards

    Murnieks, AC

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Meat proteolysis by pepsin highlighted by maldi imaging mass spectrometry

    Theron, L; Venien, A; Boland, MJ; Kaur, L; Loison, O; Chambon, C; Sante-Lhoutellier, V; Astruc, T

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The aim of this study was to highlight the in situ hydrolysis of proteins to peptides on a muscle tissue section. In this context, a bovine muscle was incubated in a pepsin solution, cryofixed and sectioned. MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) Mass spectrometry imaging was used to obtain the ionic map of proteins directly on the muscle section. This method allowed us to localize the appearance and disappearance of proteins or fragments of proteins. The results give new insights into the mechanisms of enzyme action within muscle structure.

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  • Mitigation of ammonia losses from urea applied to a pastoral system: The effect of nBTPT and timing and amount of irrigation

    Zaman, M; Saggar, SK; Stafford, AD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    To investigate the effect of applying urea with or without the urease inhibitor (UI) N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (nBTPT – trade name Agrotain®) and to assess impact of the amount and timing of irrigation on subsequent ammonia (NH3 ) emission, a field trial was set up on a research farm at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand in December 2012. Measurements of the daily NH3 emission showed that majority of NH3 losses occurred during the first 1–3 days following urea application. Delaying irrigation for 48 hr post urea application resulted in high average NH3 -N losses, at 23% and 28.3% for urea applied at 30 and 60 kg N ha-1, respectively. However, even when 5 or 10 mm of irrigation was applied 8 hours after urea application, average NH3 losses were still 11.3% and 14.4% of the N applied at 30 and 60 kg N ha-1, respectively. Our results suggest that 5 to 10 mm of irrigation/rainfall is needed very soon (<8 hr) after urea application to supress NH3 volatilisation depending on initial soil moisture contents. If this rainfall/irrigation is not guaranteed, then NH3 losses associated with standard urea application can effectively be reduced by 47% using urea treated with nBTPT.

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  • Opportunities to improve grazing management

    McCarthy, S; Hirst, C; Donaghy, D; Gray, D; Wood, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Improved efficiency in growing and converting pasture into product is required to maintain New Zealand’s competitive advantage in dairying. This study focused on two areas of grazing management, the first an assessment of the indicators leaf stage, pre-grazing yield and grazing residual. In summary, 49% of measured paddocks were grazed too soon based on leaf stage, 62% were grazed outside the recommended pre-grazing yield, and 48% of measured paddocks were not grazed to a desirable height. The second part of the study provided an insight into farmer decision making at an operational level of grazing management with three key components identified. These were: 1) The recruitment of paddocks into a grazing plan; 2) The shuffling of the paddock grazing sequence within the grazing plan; and 3) The management of individual grazing events before, during and after the event. An improved understanding by rural professionals of grazing management decision making would result in extension strategies which generate increased farmer engagement, adoption of grazing management technologies and improved on-farm productivity.

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  • Effect of 10 years of organic dairy farming on weed populations

    Harrington, KC; Osborne, MA; Kemp, PD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    To determine whether converting to organic farming increases weed problems, a trial at Massey University in New Zealand split a dairy farm in half, with one half farmed conventionally for 10 years and the other half farmed using organic principles. Weed populations in selected paddocks of each farmlet were studied for 8 years to determine how these populations would differ between the two systems. After 10 years, weed problems differed little between the two farmlets. Both still had broad-leaved dock (Rumex obtusifolius L.) and hairy buttercup (Ranunculus sardous Crantz) as their main weed species. Weeds were most noticeable in pastures in the year following regrassing activities for either farmlet, but being unable to use glyphosate during seed-bed preparation or use selective herbicides after sowing of new swards, meant weeds were sometimes worse in organic pastures after resowing than in conventional pastures. These weed problems were dealt with over the first few years after resowing by good grazing management, and ensuring pastures were dense once the annual species hairy buttercup had flowered and died, thus minimising any further establishment. Re- sults from the trial suggest that weeds need not be an impediment to organic dairying.

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  • A 'Good Employer' perceptions and practice in small enterprises

    Coetzee, DT; Foster, AB; Laird, I

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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