1,541 results for Conference paper

  • ETL tools for data warehousing : an empirical study of open source Talend Studio versus Microsoft SSIS

    Katragadda, Ranjith; Tirumala, Sreenivas Sremath; Nandigam, David (2015-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Relational databases are bound to follow various database integrity rules and constraints that makes the reporting a time consuming process. Data Warehousing has evolved out of the desperate need for easy access to structured storage of quality data that can be used for effective decision making. Data are turned into knowledge and knowledge into plans which are instrumental in profitable business decision making. To serve this purpose, data need to be extracted from various sources, transformed and loaded into the data warehouse which constitute the process of ETL (Extract, Transform and Load). ETL process can be accomplished using various tools both open source and proprietary. In this paper, we provide an empirical study of two ETL tools, an open source Talend Studio and Microsoft SSIS. In spite of the dominance among a vast majority of computer software solutions, open source technologies, as the comparative analysis that this study has undertaken, concludes that open sources tools are yet to evolve in order to be sustainable

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  • Teaching computer programming with a coaching mindset

    Rahman, Naseem; Nandigam, David; Tirumala, Sreenivas Sremath (2015-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Teaching computer programming with the coaching mindset assumes an inherent knowledge on part of the learner. Conversely learning is efficient when novices learn from people who already mastered the craft. In this paper we redefine computing teacher as a Coach, an extension to the cognitive teaching model based on a set of values and practices that emphasize a radical model of student-teacher relationship. The proposed model resulted in a significant improvement in the confidence and skill levels of beginner students which reflected in their pass rate as well as arrested dropout tendencies. Further, we describe the coaching paradigm in the context of cognitive teaching model proposed by Maslow as the most efficient method of teaching programming.

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  • The Garden City of the 21st century

    Bradbury, Matthew (2002-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2014 the prestigious Wolfson Economics Prize (2014) was awarded to David Rudlin of URBED, for answering the question “How would you deliver a new Garden City which is visionary, economically viable, and popular?” The British Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne announced in 2014 that the first new garden city for 100 years will be constructed at Ebbbsfleet (2015) in Kent, UK, to provide 15,000 homes. These two projects strongly suggest the power that Ebenezer Howard’s (Howard, 1902) original concept of Garden City still has. Yet even a cursory inspection of the two projects and the current debate in the UK show little new, unlike the radical combination of working and living within a hybrid of garden and countryside that Howard originally advanced. This paper suggests a way in which landscape architects can frame the renewed interest in the Garden City by building on the tradition of Howard’s radical inquiry. Taking a combination of techniques from environmental planning and traditional garden making the author develops a planning methodology to demonstrate how a new new garden city might be built. The paper is illustrated by two case studies designed by the author; the design of a resort in Guangdong Province, PR China [Beixing Resort Development] and a subdivision in Auckland New Zealand. [Paramuka Valley Subdivision, West Auckland] GIS mapping is used as a planning tool to analyse the sites through the mapping of important environmental features such as remnant indigenous vegetation and overland flow paths. A complex dialogue between the remediation of a native ecology through the preservation and reinstatement of indigenous hydrology and the preservation and replanting of native eco tones is developed. At the same time garden making procedures are deployed, the introduction of exotic species and the deliberate and artificial manipulation of topography. An architectural programme is introduced into this complex landscape conversation, not as an assembly of building types, but rather as a collection of social desires, a gradient from private to public space mediated through the landscape. The result is a new kind of garden city that develops an innovative social realm for the citizens, one in which a connection and awareness of the sustainable environment is central to a new garden city.

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  • Perceptions of older international tertiary students towards the sustainable future environment in New Zealand

    Theron, Bernhardett; Du Plessis, Andries; Toh, William; Sabarwal, Anu (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Sustainability refers to utilising the earth’s natural resources wisely to meet the necessities of lives but also to save the resources for future generations to survive. This research investigated perceptions of international students towards conservation and sustainable living at an international tertiary institution, UUNZ, in Auckland New Zealand. A quantitative method was applied; 92 questionnaires were distributed. The research aims to establish what international students’ attitudes and perception towards sustainability and the environment are; a correlation between age, nationality, religion and their perceptions towards sustainable living. The results revealed a negative correlation between students’ concern and perception towards sustainability and an increase in age (age 40 and older); a decrease in sustainable living. Recommendations form the last section.

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  • Swarm planning : development of generative spatial planning tool for resilient cities

    Roggema, Rob; Popov, Nikolay (2015-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In dealing with unexpected impacts of climate change current spatial planning tools are irresponsive and inflexible. The outcomes of applications of these tools are very limited in number, producing static plans that if implemented are very vulnerable to climate hazards. Therefore, an innovative generative tool has been developed to support spatial planning which results in designs that are responsive and adjustable to unexpected, simulated changes. The development of the generative tool is informed by swarm planning theory, and by contemporary generative approaches in urban design and planning. The generative tool is modeled as an Agent-Based System and utilizes versions of the canonical flocking algorithm. The agents are abstract cubical units of space that represent building envelopes. The agents exist and work within an environment that represents a site in terms of topography, land value, and available/buildable land. The agents receive information from the environment and act upon this information. The unexpected climate impact is a simulated flood, which affects both the environment and the agents. The outputs of the tool are generated 'bottom-up' in order to study emergent spatial configurations, as massings of building units.

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  • 'Same, same, but different' : a comparison of rationales between historic and contemporary school garden development

    Wake, Sue (2015-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    School gardening projects are on the rise and as the current school garden movement reaches into its third decade, this is an opportune time to consider the involvement of Landscape Architects (LAs). As design specialists of outdoor spaces and environments they may be well positioned to consult and assist with designs that meet the educational, social and maintenance needs of schools. This is especially the case since school gardens have been proposed as a panacea for a number of concerns adults have towards modern-day children, including environmental education, healthy eating, spending time in nature and getting exercise outside. Yet, interrogation of the history of school gardens reveals a paucity of their involvement then, as now. The school garden movement of the early twentieth century boomed, then bust with amazing rapidity, leaving behind a legacy among pupils of memories that were often not fond. These gardens were utilitarian and focused on production – often having a militaristic edge, as exemplified by the US School Garden Army. While they met the need of the era, they also strongly represented the adult agendas that drove them. Equally, the current movement is also driven by agendas, some the same and some different. This paper uses the colloquial saying ‘same same, but different’ to reflect the similarity of the situation between the school garden movements of the 20th and 21st centuries – both in terms of the agendas behind them and the involvement of LAs. Its aim is to argue that greater involvement of LAs could optimise the learning potential of school gardens and therefore help to prevent repetition of the demise of school gardens, which are needed more than ever.

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  • SME brand management : a lack of business skills, financial support and human resources

    Du Plessis, Andries; Indavong, Somchay; Marriott, Jeff (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Brand management is a means to building a strong brand and enhancing business performance. This research project aimed to investigate how brand management is exercised in SMEs in Laos especially in the handicrafts sector and to identify obstacles in building a successful brand for the SMEs. This study employed a semi-structured interview as a data collection method for a qualitative research approach. A total of 10 participants were interviewed in Laos. The study has found that SMEs in Laos create their brand identity through the visions and values of business owners. Unique and quality of the products and the country of origin are the key aspects for building and developing brand identity. A majority of the SME entrepreneurs do not have particular knowledge relating to branding and brand management. The SMEs still face a number of difficulties when creating, developing and managing their brands due to a scarcity of budget and a lack of human resources.

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  • Immigrant entrepreneurs and their perceived success in small retail businesses : preliminary New Zealand findings

    Nel, Pieter; Abdullah, Moha (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    As international migration continues to be a significant force in globalization, some migrants are forced by circumstances to migrate. Others are attracted by the prospects of greater economic, social, and educational opportunities for themselves and their families. Whilst many migrants take up positions in paid employment, a considerable proportion of them migrate specifically to initiate new venture start-up activities. This study highlights preliminary findings on attributes and essential elements of immigrant entrepreneurs, their issues and how they perceived their business success in small retail business. A survey comprising 262 immigrant entrepreneur respondents in Auckland, New Zealand was executed. The study found that about 40 percent had prior business experience before migrating to New Zealand with more than 30 percent migrating with a business visa. An ANOVA test conducted confirms that there are certain issues such as local business regulations, access to capital, advisory services, training facilities and access to suppliers that are important factors contributing to the perceived business success among immigrant entrepreneurs. The outcome of the study will help the training and development authorities to take the necessary steps to outline a new and productive content for potential entrepreneurial development.

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  • Social media usage by academics : some comparisons from a developing country and developed countries’ perspectives

    Nel, Pieter (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Academics and students across the globe are increasingly using social media and social connections for educational purposes. This paper focusses on a comparison of particular countries regarding the use of social media in teaching by academics and whether they can utilize this platform for effective communication to engage students in learning activities as well. The objective is to identify the usage of social media tools by academics by comparing a multi developed country study (comprising the UK, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Continental Europe and Canada) and a separate developing country study being South Africa. The data was obtained by using SurveyMonkey and executed during 2014 at tertiary educational institutions. For the developing country 204 usable responses were obtained and 711 responses from the developed countries. Suggestions are made regarding the educational environment using social media tools. It is concluded that academics are communicating with students in a positive way via the use of social media tools for educational purposes, but that much scope exists to improve the use of social media for educational purposes by academics. There are also some differences in the use of social media by academics when comparing the developing country and developed countries.

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  • The adoption of modern office workspaces by tertiary education institutes : a case study of Unitec

    Vitasovich, A.; Kiroff, Lydia; Boon, John (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Modern office workspaces, and particularly activity-based workspaces (ABW) are emerging in the education sector. The primary reasons for making changes to workspaces vary from institute to institute. Yet, there is limited research on the objectives, the overall value of making these changes, the strategic plans used, the types of workspaces being implemented and the issues faced by higher education institutes, which can potentially affect their users and their associated work practices. Semi-structured in-depth interviews within a case study approach were carried out with three groups of participants: staff that have had previous experience in new types of workspaces, staff that have not worked in such environments, and institutional key decision-makers. Field observations and a review of supporting documentation complemented the interviews. The findings indicate that there are wide-ranging organisational changes occurring within Unitec, and not just simple changes to existing workspaces with the aim of increasing collaboration, reducing facility costs and creating sector alignment. Additionally, ABW are being implemented throughout the organisation based on prototype office spaces in one campus building heavily influenced by commercial workspace design. However, higher academic work practices make unique demands potentially creating tension between the aims of the institution for increased collaboration and interaction and established work patterns. The inclusion of more private quiet spaces is suggested by the interviewees to help staff adapt to these new ways of working. Furthermore, keeping the lines of communication open and regularly updating all staff on the redevelopment of the new workspaces ensures an overall smoother transition.

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  • Is radical innovation a new value-adding paradigm for construction organisations or just a current fad? -A critique-

    Puolitaival, Taija; Kestle, Linda (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Construction Industry, globally, has long been accused of low levels of productivity and innovation and arguably cannot be as readily measured using mechanisms common to other industries. Innovation is described and defined differently according to the particular context of discourse. This research investigated a process known as ‘radical innovation’ from a published and funding perspective longitudinally over time in a range of industries, including how it may or could be interpreted, applied and add value in the construction context. A systematic and in-depth literature review was undertaken involving sources from longstanding and credible journal data bases. The findings were analysed using an interpretative methodology that incorporated a multi-dimensional measurement approach. The findings, and the subsequent critique, were broken into two components – ‘radical innovation’ persé, and ‘radical innovation’ in construction. The resultants established that ‘radical innovation’ has been explored by researchers from the 1930’s in the context of many industries, but not within the Construction Industry context – where only a handful of journal articles having been published. In addition, enablers and obstacles have been identified, with only minimal evidence of previously proven methods within the Construction Industry. A poor track record of investing in research and development, the nature of the industry being adversarial and fragmented, with many micro organisations, suggested that an action research project will be the next step to test and potentially embody ‘radical innovation’ and increase productivity.

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  • Current and anticipated future impacts of BIM on cost modelling in Auckland

    Stanley, Ryan; Thurnell, Derek (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    5D Building Information Modelling (BIM) models contain data consisting of 3D objects which also include information relating to construction scheduling and cost aspects, and has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs) for such tasks as quantity take-offs, estimation and cost management (i.e. cost modelling), in a collaborative project environment with design team members such as architects and engineers. A ‘snapshot’ of 5D BIM use in Auckland is presented, based on structured interviews which gained the perceptions of 8 QSs, on both the current and likely future impacts of 5D BIM on cost modelling. Results suggest that in Auckland there is currently a low level of engagement with 5D BIM, and thus it has a low impact, although a small number of QSs indicate they are already using 5D BIM in a limited manner for some aspects of cost modelling. Most QSs interviewed thought that 5D BIM would have an extremely significant impact in the future, as the process becomes more prevalent.

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  • Working hours in a large New Zealand construction company

    Morrison, Emily Jane; Thurnell, Derek (2012)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Long working hours and weekend working are an integral part of many jobs in the construction industry, and are job characteristics that are linked to work-life conflict, which adversely affects employees' ability to achieve work-life balance. Furthermore, the industry's culture of long working hours limits its ability to attract and retain talented employees. Since much of the work-life research in the construction industry focuses on working-hours, this research aimed to identify the typical working hours of the professional and managerial staff within a single large New Zealand construction company. One hundred and twenty one (121) head office and site-based employees responded to an online survey. Results support the assertion that New Zealand construction industry employees tend to work long hours, and hat work location affects working hour demands. Qualitative results suggest some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work exists. The New Zealand construction industry must provide a supportive work place culture in which to address these issues, and provide reasonable working hours, in order to find a balance that is suitable to employees, companies and the industry as a whole.

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  • Simplified model forecasting changes to groundwater table and land lost due to sea level rise

    Li, Jiannan; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It is well known that climate change is causing sea levels to change worldwide. This sea level increase is causing loss of land and changes to water table in coastal zones. There are sophisticated models such as ARCGIS, FEEFLOW etc. to model and accurately calculate the changes occurring in these areas. In order to use these models one requires good quality data sets coupled with experienced modellers which is at times sparse and hard to source. Therefore here in this research a simplified method is proposed to estimate the changes occurring in these areas. Initially sea level changes were projected using linear regression method. Changes to land and water table in Wellington New Zealand were simulated, modelled and a simple model was developed using this data to estimate changes. The model was validated using a different data set series. This model could now be used to easily estimate the changes to ground water and land loss in other coastal zones, particularly where data is sparse and technical knowhow on modelling is limited, which is generally the case in most areas.

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  • Cities of wrecked desire : post-apocalyptic cinema and ruin pornography

    Wilson, Scott (2017-06-02T14:30:05Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ruin pornography – the photographic aestheticization of architectural decay – has a long history in cinema and television and is linked to spectacles of apocalypse and its aftermath. More recently, these representational tropes have become a photographic genre in their own right, highlighting and, perhaps, celebrating urban and industrial decay. While not necessarily emerging from the same apocalyptic events as their fictional counterparts, the fact that similar kinds of formal representational characteristics are repeated between fiction and non-fiction means that those non-fiction, documentary images are interpreted in the same ways as those of the cities of films such as Oblivion (Joseph Kosinski, 2013), After Earth (M. Night Shyamalan, 2013) and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (Matt Reeves, 2014) (amongst many others). As a consequence, it has been claimed that: ... ruin photography and ruin film aestheticizes poverty without inquiring of its origins, dramatizes spaces but never seeks out the people that inhabit and transform them, and romanticizes isolated acts of resistance without acknowledging the massive political and social forces aligned against the real transformation, and not just stubborn survival, of the city (Leary, 2013). This paper will explore the aesthetics of both ruin pornography and post-apocalyptic cinema and television in order to assess the manner in which this form of documentary reportage might or might not succeed in drawing attention to the causes and conditions of urban decay, economic collapse, and the possibility for positive urban and civil reconstruction and outcomes.

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  • Does a Modified Foot-stretcher Improve 500-m On-water and Ergometer Rowing Performance Time and Comfort?

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Foot-stretcher force contributes to rowing performance. A New Zealand designed modified rowing foot-stretcher has a rigid clog shoe with heel and toe wedges to allow contact of the whole surface of the foot to the foot-plate throughout the entire rowing stroke. This study examined the effect of modified and standard foot-stretchers for eight competitive rowers during on-water double scull and static Concept2 ergometer 500-m rowing. Race time and comfort were recorded. Comfort measures indicated that the modified foot-stretcher was preferred both on-water and ergometer. Performance time measures indicated a potential performance enhancement with the modified foot-stretcher on-water (2.0%), however due to large confidence intervals, the results were unclear. This modified foot-stretcher assisted athletes rowing comfort and showed potential for performance enhancement.

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  • Facilitating vertical integration of knowledge from animal physiology to farm system level

    Matthew, C; Parkinson, T; Kemp, P

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We describe a teaching methodology evolved over 25 years for taking incoming students with little farming background to near-consultancy level in terms of ability to discuss feed supply and demand manipulation with practicing farmers. The methodology is currently used in a double semester course offering to 2nd year BVSc students at Massey University with positive feedback from students. Component skills such as visual assessment of herbage mass are introduced at the outset. A keystone of the methodology is the provision of student operated 'farmlets' with 16 sheep on 0.8 ha, where the storage of autumn-surplus feed as increased herbage mass, and release back to animals for winter and early lactation feed is demonstrated. Feed budget calculations for these farmlets in units of MJ metabolisable energy and kg pasture DM/ha/ day promote understanding of animal physiology principles and simulate those of a larger scale commercial farm. As currently offered the module comprises 20 lectures and 5 organised 2 hour farmlet discussion and data collection visits. Students complete additional farmlet work in their own time, such as moving or weighing sheep. Two written assignments promote integration of component knowledge and ownership of that information by participants.

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  • Water quality, metagenomics and the microbial community in DOC campground water

    Phiri, BJ; Biggs, PJ; Rainey, PB; Stevenson, MA; Prattley, DJ; French, NP

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Improving memory in midlife: A multiple case study evaluation of a group-based memory programme for healthy middle-aged individuals

    Scheibner, G; Leathem, JM

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Background • The literature shows that significant memory decline begins during midlife which is usually defined as the period of life between of 40-65 years of age. • 40 % of middle-aged people report everyday forgetfulness (Ponds, Commissaris, & Jolles, 1997). • More than half of these people perceive their forgetfulness as a hindrance in their daily live. • 70% of individuals in this age-group have expressed worries about their increasing forgetfulness (Commissaris, Ponds, & Jolles, 1998). • Memory interventions though are usually intended for individuals who are older than 65 years of age with mild to moderate memory impairment or for people with recognised neurological conditions such as TBI.

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  • Communication about communication: Theory and research on early communication development in the last 40 years

    Lock, AJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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