1,378 results for Conference paper

  • Construction project control methodologies and productivity improvement : EVM, BIM, LBM

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, Toby (2015-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Construction productivity has been and remains a concern of organizations and governments. Productivity is also a concern of individual projects. A recent survey of 50 international construction project controls professionals found limited support for the effectiveness of three well known project control systems: Earned Value Management (EVM), Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Location Based Management (LBM). Analysis of the data collected during semi-structured interviews highlights two important problems in both commercial and infrastructure projects. The study found that all organizations used one or more of these methodologies. However, each of the methodologies was considered effective only for some projects or some parts of those projects. It appears that a major reason for lack of effectiveness is that project team capability and capacity to implement the methodology effectively was variable. However, it may be that an even more important factor is linked to the ineffective implementation; lack of understanding the theory that underpins these types of project control methodologies. EVM, BIM and LBM are all systemic methodologies aimed at reduction of waste as a means to improve productivity, thus all require consistent project process: data collection, monitoring, reporting and forecasting for effective control.

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  • Public data re-use policy, but not for road construction in Australia

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, Toby; Bedggood, Julianna (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Australian states are mandated to provide researchers access to public sector information (PSI) through three legislative mechanisms: Public Sector Information, Public Records and Freedom of Information. In theory open government is possible because digital technologies allow all PSI to be accessible. Thus, construction management researchers should be able to access public construction documents via government Internet sites. However, this pilot study of 30 road projects indicates a gap between theory and practice. An archival method was used to search the online procurement documents of three states; New South Wales, Western Australia and Queensland. The searches aimed to find the five commonly used road construction procurement documents that could be used by construction management researchers for comparative analysis. However, documentation for road projects could not always be found. Analysis of the search process and the type of procurement documents accessed indicates significant open PSI differences in these three states. Discussion of the application of the three types of public sector information access legislation is one way of making sense of the variability of access to EOI, EIA, RFP, RFT, and Contract procurements documents via an open PSI in a system within a multiplicity of states and departments.

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  • How will NZ's construction industry escalate productivity to meet the largest predicted construction demand in decades - is a lean approach one of the magic bullets?

    Bosnich, Anthony; Kestle, Linda (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Low productivity levels for at least twenty years in New Zealand’s construction industry have only realised any improvement by increasing hourly inputs, (a 0.2% per annum rise since the 1990’s). NZ’s Productivity Commission in 2010, and the NZ Sector Report by Minister Joyce in 2013, regards increased productivity in the construction industry as essential for the benefit of all New Zealanders, as it affects the Gross Domestic Product, employment rates and living conditions. The construction industry employs around 170 000 people, and predictions are that there will be unprecedented building and construction growth over the next 5-10 years, due in the main to Auckland’s predicted 25% population growth by 2025, and Christchurch’s rebuild following the major earthquakes four years ago. Auckland will see a 68% increase in new building according to Minster Joyce (2013) outstripping Christchurch’s rebuild demands over the same period. The paper investigated how to potentially and realistically increase productivity and business performance, across design and construction management in the New Zealand Construction Industry, over the next decade or so. An in-depth and critical analysis of relevant international journals, conference papers, and New Zealand government agency and non-agency publications was undertaken. The key findings included a very strong recommendation that senior management personnel in the construction industry need to fully implement a lean management approach in the NZ productivity context, that is then driven by full consultant and on-site employee involvement and ownership.

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  • Steps in a journey towards a fuzzy future

    Boon, John; Laing, Neil (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    From 2009 to early 2015 the Department of Construction at Unitec Institute of Technology has grappled with the challenges of changing technology that have impacted on both what and how it teaches. It has done this within a changing organizational environment. The lack of full understanding of the potential of the technology at the outset together with the changes of management personnel and policies have meant that change has been achieved in a messy evolving manner rather than through a planned and managed process. However it did in 2010 document a strategy articulating what it wanted to achieve. This document has helped it to guide itself through the complexity of the forces of change to have made significant developments and position itself to make further progress.

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  • Removing hidden waiting time in critical path schedules : a location-based approach to avoiding waste

    Kenley, Russell; Harfield, Toby (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Production waste from non-productive activities is a well understood concept in Lean Construction Management. Waiting-time is also a well understood form of production waste. However, waste arising from the hidden waiting-time inherent in poorly designed CPM schedules has not previously been described. Hidden waiting-time is defined and demonstrated using location-based visualisation methods for construction cycles. A construction cycle refers to a repetitive sequence of work required to erect a structure. Two case studies illustrate how such waiting time can be removed and replaced by production buffers using appropriate levels of location breakdown. What sort of waste is represented by the time reduction demonstrated in these case studies? The TFV based taxonomy of wastes includes both inefficient waste and waiting time, but combining the two to define hidden waste found in CPM schedules, requires a new category. Cycle waiting time is the waste of not planning the most efficient project structural cycle and therefore not being able to identify hidden wastes based on utilisation of location based structure

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  • Assessment in virtual design and construction education

    Puolitaival, Taija; Kestle, Linda; Davies, Kathryn; Forsythe, Perry (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) is effecting a fundamental change throughout the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, and educational institutes have taken different approaches in response. A few have adopted an integrated approach which adds VDC into existing curricula, others have concentrated on delivering separate content via dedicated subject or have focused more on the technology, Building Information Modelling (BIM), or taken a wider approach by also including the VDC process. Under these differing scenarios, appropriate assessment modes come into question, and need to be centred around intended learning outcomes. This paper focusses on the challenges of setting up and conducting assessments for VDC in a tertiary construction project management (CPM) education setting. A developmental action research methodology was adopted leading to a documented case study, built around an undergraduate level BCons CPM course (Planning and Organisation 2) at Unitec. VDC was used as a central delivery and assessment vehicle. The main challenges encountered were twofold, firstly, finding the balance between CPM knowledge and skills and BIM software skills, and secondly, the unfamiliarity of the VDC environment for both the students and the teaching staff.

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  • Data mining driven computational analysis of stock markets, methods and strategies

    Lai, Anthony; Phang, Shaoning; Holmes, Wayne (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The stock market is a complex, dynamic and non-linear environment. The prediction of any future market reaction is further complicated by huge amounts of often unstructured financial data and uncertainty due to the effects of unforeseen market events. The application of correlation analysis to significant market events is still seen as a useful tool in the prediction of future trends on the stock market in a global sense. This paper proposes the application of data mining computation correlation analysis to the stock market to enhance the durability of predictions. This method of correlation analysis is a combination of cross correlation, auto correlation and fundamental analysis that is further enhanced by Channel correlation, Weighted Pearson’s correlation and added correlation Support Vector Regression. Channel correlation traces the similarity of trends while the weighted Pearson’s correlation acts as a noise filter during the correlation extraction process

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  • Simulation model, warm-up period, and simulation length of cellular systems

    Kolahi, Samad (2011-01-25)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, discrete event simulation by batch-means of a M/M/∞ queuing system is utilised to simulate a cellular CDMA system. The details of the simulation model, warm-up period, and simulation run time are discussed. The warm-up period is studied because it affects the accuracy of the results in simulation of communication systems. During the warm-up period-when the simulation system has not reached the steady-state situation-, the system results (eg blocking probability) vary very rapidly from zero to 0.037 for the parameters used. In the batch-means method with 10,000 calls per batch and for 50 batches (500,000 calls), the CDMA blocking probability is 0.0192 with 99% confidence interval.

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  • Bandwidth-IPSec security trade-off in IPv4 and IPv6 in Windows 7 environment

    Kolahi, Samad; Cao, Yuqing (Rico); Chen, Hong (2013-11-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Due to overheads of security algorithms used in IPSec, transferring data using IPSec is known to be significantly slow compared with open system. In this paper, we present new results on performance of IPSec using 7 encryption systems for both IPv4 and IPv6 using Windows 7 and wireless network access. For the system studied, enabling IPSec results in approximately 60% (IPv4) and 48% (IPv6) less TCP throughput compared to open system. Among encryption mechanisms, 3DES-SHA provides the highest TCP bandwidth for IPv4, while 3DES-MD5 gives the best result for IPv6. We also provide the results for UDP.

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  • Evaluation of IPv6 with IPSec in IEEE 802.11n Wireless LAN using Fedora 15 Operating System

    Kolahi, Samad; Cao, Yuqing (Rico); Chen, Hong (2013-07-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    IPSec (IP Security) is a robust technique for securing communications over the Internet. Due to security algorithms used, transferring data using IPSec is known to be significantly slow. In this paper using a test bed environment for a site to site IPSec, we present new results on performance of IPSec for both IPv4 and IPv6 using Fedora 15 operating system and wireless network. Compared to open system, enabling IPSec results in approximately 50% and 40% less throughput for IPv4 and IPv6 networks respectively.

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  • The impact of wireless LAN security on performance for different windows operating systems

    Kolahi, Samad; Narayan, Shaneel; Nguyen, Du D.T.; Sunarto, Yonathan; Mani, Paul (2008-07-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper investigates the impact of various encryption techniques (WEP-64, WEP-128 and WPA) on performance of wireless LANs for Windows operating systems (Windows Server 2003, Windows XP and Windows Vista) and for both TCP and UDP protocols. The parameters considered are throughput and response time. The results indicate that security mechanism does influence the wireless performance and different operating systems provide various results.

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  • The tempered edge : waterfront development in an age of climate change.

    Bradbury, Matthew (2014-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Urban waterfront development has followed the Baltimore waterfront model since the 1970s. This model is characterised by the formation of a thin promenade of public space with carefully choreo- graphed event architecture, behind which lies retail, commercial and residential development. The sustainability of this model has recently been called into question by the consequence of climate change manifested in recent storm events such as Hurricane Sandy. This paper proposes an alternative waterfront design model, one that builds environmental resilience into the typical waterfront development while still generating the expected real estate returns. The author expounds a development methodology using hydrologically modelling tools to measure the production of urban stormwater within the larger urban catchment. Modelling different scenarios, especially the implications in the increase of pervious surfaces, suggests a way in which the contemporary waterfront can become more resilient to the consequences of climate change while at the same time retaining an expected commercial return. A test case site is used to model the proposed methodology. The results show that to accommodate the hydrological consequence of climate change a radically reconfigured master plan must be adopted.

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  • Using eLearning, blended learning and digital literacy to improve student engagement and retention

    Du Plessis, Andries; Young, Curtis; Nel, Pieter (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    CAA is New Zealand’s largest private tertiary education provider for the hairdressing, makeup and beauty therapy industries. CAA was used as a case study to assess the viability of eLearning innovation, using a phenomenological approach, to increase student engagement, retention and success in a work based training academy. The hypothesis was that the use of blended learning and digital literacy tools via eLearning management system would boost student engagement and improve CAA’s business goals of student retention, engagement and success. The empirical research included conducting three focus groups and 12 in-depth interviews with key stake holders. The results confirmed the hypothesis to boost student engagement to improve student retention at CAA.

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  • Wealth with green : lessons with exemplary green enterprise

    Mellalieu, Peter (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The paper reports progress on the launch of a project to empower a multidisciplinary faculty of students and teachers to implement practical actions towards improving environmental sustainability in their multiple contexts. The project focusses on drawing lessons FOR and WITH SMEs who have the ambition to achieve a zero or positive environmental impact as a by-product (or product) of their operations. The rationale for the project is that many efforts to pursue environmental sustainability are insufficient to address the true environmental challenges that face societies. The paper concludes by challenging educators to adopt Education for Sustainability enabling every graduate to think and act as a sustainable practitioner in their employment, their household, their communities, and their professional discipline.

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  • Bring your own device classroom : issues of digital divides in teaching and learning contexts

    Adhikari, Janak; Mathrani, Anuradha; Parsons, David (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Technology mediated learning provides potentially valuable resources for learners’ academic and social development. However, according to recent researches, as the adoption stages of ICTs advance there arises further levels of digital divides in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the last three years we have been working with one of the earliest secondary school in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. Our research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations. In this paper we present the findings from the investigation into BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of technology mediated learning. Teaching and learning practices are evolving continually across formal and informal spaces, and this study informs us how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process.

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  • Are higher education institutions delivering customer satisfaction?

    de Jager, Johan W.; Jan, Muhammad Tahir; Hebblethwaite, Denisa (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Higher education institutions are realising the importance of a customer centred approach to survival in the face of increased domestic competition and the globalisation of higher education. The objective of the study is to determine the impact of different variables on customer satisfaction in the higher education sector. More explicitly, this study aims to identify the effects of: support facilities and infrastructure; location and access; and image and marketing on customer satisfaction. A random sample of 390 students was chosen. A review of the structural model indicates that only the impact of ‘support facilities and infrastructure’ on customer satisfaction can be supported statistically.

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  • WPA2 security-bandwith trade-off in 802.11n peer-peer WLAN for IPv4 and IPv6 using Windows XP and Windows 7 operating systems

    Kolahi, Samad; Li, Peng; Safdari, Mustafa; Argawe, Mulugeta (2012-07-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, we present new results on the performance of IEEE 802.11n using open system (no security) and WPA2 security for Windows XP and Windows 7. Enabling WPA2 security results in approximately 4.4 Mbps less TCP throughput than open system for both IPv4 and IPv6 on Windows XP and up to 2.8 Mbps less TCP throughput for Windows 7. For both open system and WPA2 security, Windows 7 provides higher IPv4 and IPv6 bandwidth than Windows XP and IPv4 provides higher bandwidth than IPv6.

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  • Performance evaluation of virtual private network protocols in Windows 2003 environment

    Narayan, Shaneel; Kolahi, Samad; Brooking, Kris; de Vere, Simon (2008-12-20)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a technology that provides secure communication for data as it transits through insecure regions of information technology infrastructure. With prolific development of the Internet, businesses nowadays implement VPN tunnels using different protocols that guarantee data authenticity and security between multiple sites connected using public telecommunication infrastructure. VPN provides a low-cost alternative to leasing a line to establish communication between sites. In this research we empirically evaluate performance difference between three commonly used VPN protocols, namely Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Secure Socket Layer (SSL). We compare performance differences in these protocols by implementing each using different algorithms in a Windows Server 2003 environment. Results obtained indicate that throughput in a VPN tunnel can range from approximately 40 to 90Mbps depending on the choice of protocol, algorithm and window size. These three attributes also govern CPU utilization of VPN servers.

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  • Flipping research : a model for future focused research making learning visible in health and physical education

    McKay, Anne; Bowes, Margot; Thompson, Kylie (2015-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper reports on a future-focused model for practitioner-led inquiry (PLI) in secondary Health and Physical Education (HPE). As a future-focused model this paper draws the notion of the Flipped Classroom (Tucker, 2012), where teacher’s front end the development of their inquiry questions with the support of tertiary academics who review the literature and suggest appropriate methodology to support the teachers’ research, while simultaneously addressing the tension for teacher educators to conduct research as a significant output of academic work. The purpose of the study is to make student learning more visible to students, their families (whānau) and to make this learning as explicit to both of these groups as it was to their teachers. The paper describes concerns raised by teachers that students found it difficult to identify their learning in Health and Physical Education (HPE) and consequently the students could not recognise next steps for future learning. This concern became the focus of the inquiry approach in two large metropolitan city schools; a traditional subject specific HPE delivery school and a school with a future-focused integrated subject curriculum. The study used a collaborative action model where both students and their whānau were asked what students actually learn in HPE, how they learn and how they know they are learning? As co-researchers with teachers, the authors believe that if students and their whānau are able to recognise what they are learning and how they are learning it becomes a more realistic goal for them to jointly consider, where are the next steps in their learning are. This puts students more on the path to being self-regulating and lifelong learners. As the co- researchers we argue that by making the metacognitive process of learning visible in HPE contexts, beyond teachers to students and their whānau, the Vision of the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) (Ministry of Education, (MOE), 2007) of Twenty First Century (21C) learners as highly confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners, may be better actualised.

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  • Peace without Perfection: The intersections of Realist and Pacifist thought

    Moses, J. (2015)

    Conference paper
    University of Canterbury Library

    It is generally assumed that realist political thought is the polar opposite of pacifism on questions of war and peace. In debates over the justifiability of violence in response to physical threats to ourselves or to others, pacifists will generally be confronted with ‘realistic’ analogies of personal self-defence against an assailant or to what are seen as the most obvious and compelling examples of ‘just wars’ from human history. Thus, as Duane Cady puts it, ‘[e]ntertaining pacifist thoughts means being prepared repeatedly to face questions about reacting to a mugger and confronting Hitler as well as being realistic, self-righteous, and self-sacrificial’ (Cady, 1989, p. 95). Thus, in constructing his ‘moral continuum’ from ‘warism to pacifism’, Cady himself places ‘war realism’, the view that ‘war itself is not an appropriate object of moral consideration’, at the ‘most extreme’ end of his spectrum. Realist views on war, therefore, are seen as being more distant from and irreconcilable with pacifist thinking than the via media of ‘just-warism’ (Cady, 1989, pp. 21-23). As a consequence of this kind of thinking, it is generally assumed that pacifists at the ‘pragmatic’ or ‘realistic’ end of the scale will normally allow for the possibility of fighting just wars in certain limited circumstances, as has been the case in just war theory from Augustine onwards. In contrast to this popular view, this paper will propose that the realist placing of war outside of questions of morality and justice actually has more in common with a pacifist position than is normally acknowledged and that this connection could be more fruitfully developed. Just war theory, from this point of view, represents a proliferation of malleable moral arguments for war that are not available from a realist perspective, which is deeply concerned with the limiting of moral arguments in favour of war for demonstrably ethical reasons. Yet this still leaves a number of important questions to consider. First and foremost, if we accept that the world is and always will be an imperfect place, as any realist thinker must, is there still any sense – or even any consistent possibility – in maintaining an opposition to all war? How does the realist reading of the imperfectability of man relate to problems of politics and war? And how might those theoretical claims connect to a politics of non-violence or pacifism?

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