1,415 results for Conference paper

  • SME brand management : a lack of business skills, financial support and human resources

    Du Plessis, Andries; Indavong, Somchay; Marriott, Jeff (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Brand management is a means to building a strong brand and enhancing business performance. This research project aimed to investigate how brand management is exercised in SMEs in Laos especially in the handicrafts sector and to identify obstacles in building a successful brand for the SMEs. This study employed a semi-structured interview as a data collection method for a qualitative research approach. A total of 10 participants were interviewed in Laos. The study has found that SMEs in Laos create their brand identity through the visions and values of business owners. Unique and quality of the products and the country of origin are the key aspects for building and developing brand identity. A majority of the SME entrepreneurs do not have particular knowledge relating to branding and brand management. The SMEs still face a number of difficulties when creating, developing and managing their brands due to a scarcity of budget and a lack of human resources.

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  • Designing mobile applications for smoking cessation in New Zealand

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Wu, Lian; Casey, John; Biddle, TeUrikore (2016-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Tobacco is a leading cause of preventable death in New Zealand. The smoking rate for New Zealand Māori was 44 percent in 2009, still significantly higher than for non-Māori (18 percent) for both males and females. In this research project, a novel mobile application (SmokefreeNZ) has been designed and developed, which can provide two way interactions between the server and client, whereas traditional text interventions only provide one-way communication (from server to client). This novel approach integrates interactive Mobile Technology, Social Psychology, Persuasive Technology and Behavioural Therapy to deliver personalised content in both English and Te Reo Māori, which is designed to encourage and help individual smokers to quit smoking. It serves as a tool and platform to rouse and maintain the desire and motivation to quit smoking. It is also capable of delivering tailored multimedia content to smokers from different cultural backgrounds, and will provide a clear goal for the quit attempt, maintaining the salience and reward value of making progress towards that goal. It can also use evidence based methods of reducing the desire and impulses to smoke. Currently a cased-controlled trial is undergoing to further investigate the effectiveness of the app as an intervention tool.

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  • Immigrant entrepreneurs and their perceived success in small retail businesses : preliminary New Zealand findings

    Nel, Pieter; Abdullah, Moha (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    As international migration continues to be a significant force in globalization, some migrants are forced by circumstances to migrate. Others are attracted by the prospects of greater economic, social, and educational opportunities for themselves and their families. Whilst many migrants take up positions in paid employment, a considerable proportion of them migrate specifically to initiate new venture start-up activities. This study highlights preliminary findings on attributes and essential elements of immigrant entrepreneurs, their issues and how they perceived their business success in small retail business. A survey comprising 262 immigrant entrepreneur respondents in Auckland, New Zealand was executed. The study found that about 40 percent had prior business experience before migrating to New Zealand with more than 30 percent migrating with a business visa. An ANOVA test conducted confirms that there are certain issues such as local business regulations, access to capital, advisory services, training facilities and access to suppliers that are important factors contributing to the perceived business success among immigrant entrepreneurs. The outcome of the study will help the training and development authorities to take the necessary steps to outline a new and productive content for potential entrepreneurial development.

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  • Social media usage by academics : some comparisons from a developing country and developed countries’ perspectives

    Nel, Pieter (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Academics and students across the globe are increasingly using social media and social connections for educational purposes. This paper focusses on a comparison of particular countries regarding the use of social media in teaching by academics and whether they can utilize this platform for effective communication to engage students in learning activities as well. The objective is to identify the usage of social media tools by academics by comparing a multi developed country study (comprising the UK, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Continental Europe and Canada) and a separate developing country study being South Africa. The data was obtained by using SurveyMonkey and executed during 2014 at tertiary educational institutions. For the developing country 204 usable responses were obtained and 711 responses from the developed countries. Suggestions are made regarding the educational environment using social media tools. It is concluded that academics are communicating with students in a positive way via the use of social media tools for educational purposes, but that much scope exists to improve the use of social media for educational purposes by academics. There are also some differences in the use of social media by academics when comparing the developing country and developed countries.

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  • The adoption of modern office workspaces by tertiary education institutes : a case study of Unitec

    Vitasovich, A.; Kiroff, Lydia; Boon, John (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Modern office workspaces, and particularly activity-based workspaces (ABW) are emerging in the education sector. The primary reasons for making changes to workspaces vary from institute to institute. Yet, there is limited research on the objectives, the overall value of making these changes, the strategic plans used, the types of workspaces being implemented and the issues faced by higher education institutes, which can potentially affect their users and their associated work practices. Semi-structured in-depth interviews within a case study approach were carried out with three groups of participants: staff that have had previous experience in new types of workspaces, staff that have not worked in such environments, and institutional key decision-makers. Field observations and a review of supporting documentation complemented the interviews. The findings indicate that there are wide-ranging organisational changes occurring within Unitec, and not just simple changes to existing workspaces with the aim of increasing collaboration, reducing facility costs and creating sector alignment. Additionally, ABW are being implemented throughout the organisation based on prototype office spaces in one campus building heavily influenced by commercial workspace design. However, higher academic work practices make unique demands potentially creating tension between the aims of the institution for increased collaboration and interaction and established work patterns. The inclusion of more private quiet spaces is suggested by the interviewees to help staff adapt to these new ways of working. Furthermore, keeping the lines of communication open and regularly updating all staff on the redevelopment of the new workspaces ensures an overall smoother transition.

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  • Is radical innovation a new value-adding paradigm for construction organisations or just a current fad? -A critique-

    Puolitaival, Taija; Kestle, Linda (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Construction Industry, globally, has long been accused of low levels of productivity and innovation and arguably cannot be as readily measured using mechanisms common to other industries. Innovation is described and defined differently according to the particular context of discourse. This research investigated a process known as ‘radical innovation’ from a published and funding perspective longitudinally over time in a range of industries, including how it may or could be interpreted, applied and add value in the construction context. A systematic and in-depth literature review was undertaken involving sources from longstanding and credible journal data bases. The findings were analysed using an interpretative methodology that incorporated a multi-dimensional measurement approach. The findings, and the subsequent critique, were broken into two components – ‘radical innovation’ persé, and ‘radical innovation’ in construction. The resultants established that ‘radical innovation’ has been explored by researchers from the 1930’s in the context of many industries, but not within the Construction Industry context – where only a handful of journal articles having been published. In addition, enablers and obstacles have been identified, with only minimal evidence of previously proven methods within the Construction Industry. A poor track record of investing in research and development, the nature of the industry being adversarial and fragmented, with many micro organisations, suggested that an action research project will be the next step to test and potentially embody ‘radical innovation’ and increase productivity.

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  • Enhancing educational success through Talanoa : a framework for the Pacific

    Prescott, James; Fua, Seu’ula Johansson (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Talanoa is a traditional means of oral communication common to the Island nations of the Pacific. This paper introduces a framework for alleviating student success and retention at early childhood education, primary and secondary schools for Pacific students learning in a social context outside of their own culture. The framework is based on traditional talanoa as a research tool and methodology. In particular, the paper discusses the application talanoa as part of the assessment process, curriculum development, teaching and learning, and evaluation. The proposed framework draws on the experiences and design of the Te Kotahitanga project introduced in New Zealand in 2001 and will be relevant to the ongoing aim to improve educational success and retention among Pacific students. Given the discussions draw on experience in New Zealand over the past twenty years, it will be of particular relevance to local policy developers.

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  • Current and anticipated future impacts of BIM on cost modelling in Auckland

    Stanley, Ryan; Thurnell, Derek (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    5D Building Information Modelling (BIM) models contain data consisting of 3D objects which also include information relating to construction scheduling and cost aspects, and has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs) for such tasks as quantity take-offs, estimation and cost management (i.e. cost modelling), in a collaborative project environment with design team members such as architects and engineers. A ‘snapshot’ of 5D BIM use in Auckland is presented, based on structured interviews which gained the perceptions of 8 QSs, on both the current and likely future impacts of 5D BIM on cost modelling. Results suggest that in Auckland there is currently a low level of engagement with 5D BIM, and thus it has a low impact, although a small number of QSs indicate they are already using 5D BIM in a limited manner for some aspects of cost modelling. Most QSs interviewed thought that 5D BIM would have an extremely significant impact in the future, as the process becomes more prevalent.

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  • Working hours in a large New Zealand construction company

    Morrison, Emily Jane; Thurnell, Derek (2012)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Long working hours and weekend working are an integral part of many jobs in the construction industry, and are job characteristics that are linked to work-life conflict, which adversely affects employees' ability to achieve work-life balance. Furthermore, the industry's culture of long working hours limits its ability to attract and retain talented employees. Since much of the work-life research in the construction industry focuses on working-hours, this research aimed to identify the typical working hours of the professional and managerial staff within a single large New Zealand construction company. One hundred and twenty one (121) head office and site-based employees responded to an online survey. Results support the assertion that New Zealand construction industry employees tend to work long hours, and hat work location affects working hour demands. Qualitative results suggest some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work exists. The New Zealand construction industry must provide a supportive work place culture in which to address these issues, and provide reasonable working hours, in order to find a balance that is suitable to employees, companies and the industry as a whole.

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  • Application of floating vegetative pads (FVP) to improve stormwater quality : a pilot scale study

    Yu, Ronald; Mahmood, Babar; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Henderson Creek contributes one of the largest load of sediments & heavy metals (e.g. Copper - Cu and Zinc - Zn) into the Central Waitemata Harbour, Auckland. Cu and Zn particles do not decompose so they are persistent, accumulating on sediments, in filter-feeding shellfish and in plants, and therefore, aquatic health is affected by turbidity and that degrades stormwater pond ecosystem. It is the one of the key item of the Auckland City Council agenda to reduce Cu and Zn in urban storm water detention ponds in order to protect & improve the aquatic ecosystems’ health of stormwater ponds in Auckland Region. A mesocosm study was conducted at Unitec to investigate the performance of Floating Vegetative Pads (FVP, planted with native plants) in terms of their ability to remove heavy metals, particularly, Cu and Zn and the particulates from the storm water detention pond in Hilwell Drive, Henderson. The eight treatments were compared in this experiment i.e. a floating polystyrene pad on its own (treatment G), a floating polystyrene pad with artificial roots (treatment H), and six floating polystyrene pads with six different native plant species (i.e. ApodasmiaSimilis – treatment A, Deschampsia Caespitosa - treatment B, FiniciaNodosa - treatment C, Hierocloe Redolens - treatment D, Lachnagrostis Billardierei - treatment E, PoaAnceps Blue - treatment F) in six individual buckets). Storm water samples were collected in the buckets from the studied pond, and then analysed for pH, Cu and Zn. Plant growth of the six native plants used in this experiment were measured by an increase in their wet mass from the start (day 0) until the end of experiment i.e. day 21. Among all the treatments, B and E treatments removed total Cu (i.e. both dissolved and particulate forms - mg) by 30%. Treatment B and F removed the most total Zn (Zn both in dissolved and particulate forms) by 60% and 50%, respectively. It is not clear why treatment D ended up with more Cu and Zn as compared to the initial values, and this requires further investigation. Although the treatments G and H (i.e. without and with artificial roots) removed Cu and Zn by 20%. The study showed that treatment E had almost 60% increases in wet mass (i.e. increased from 98.5 to 157.5 g/d). The pH of all treatments except treatment G reduced from 7.35 to 6.45. The drop in pH levels could be due to the bacterial activity happening in the rhizosphere, which releases rhizo deposits and that can drop pH.The treatments E and F had the most area daily Cu-mass removal rates i.e. 0.074 and 0.082 mg/m2/d (i.e. 7.4 and 8.2 mg/100 m2/d), respectively. Whereas, treatment B performed well in terms areal daily Zn-mass removal rate of 0.496 mg/m2/d (i.e. 49.6 mg/100 m2/d).

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  • Simplified model forecasting changes to groundwater table and land lost due to sea level rise

    Li, Jiannan; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It is well known that climate change is causing sea levels to change worldwide. This sea level increase is causing loss of land and changes to water table in coastal zones. There are sophisticated models such as ARCGIS, FEEFLOW etc. to model and accurately calculate the changes occurring in these areas. In order to use these models one requires good quality data sets coupled with experienced modellers which is at times sparse and hard to source. Therefore here in this research a simplified method is proposed to estimate the changes occurring in these areas. Initially sea level changes were projected using linear regression method. Changes to land and water table in Wellington New Zealand were simulated, modelled and a simple model was developed using this data to estimate changes. The model was validated using a different data set series. This model could now be used to easily estimate the changes to ground water and land loss in other coastal zones, particularly where data is sparse and technical knowhow on modelling is limited, which is generally the case in most areas.

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  • Goldfinger revisited. James Bond set designs by Ken Adam as modernist spaces of power

    Schnoor, Christoph; Wilson, Scott (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ken Adam (b. 1921) developed set designs for seven of the early James Bond films and a number of other important works. Goldfinger (1964) is among the most famous of these films, and Adam’s designs have since made film and design history, featuring in a number of influential exhibitions and publications. Adam’s life as an exiled German Jew, who studied architecture in London and who flew for the RAF during the Second World War, means, as Petra Kissling-Koch’s suggests in her exploration of Adam’s work, that these designed spaces of (evil) power as the hideouts of Bond’s antagonists can be understood directly in relation to Adam’s historical context and biography. This paper offers a close examination of Adam’s designs, paying particular attention to the development of the Bond series through Dr No, Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice, and the ways in which Adam’s work makes visible a historically and contextually informed relationship between architecture, power and the representation of evil. While the cinematic representations of the spaces of evil – especially in the Bond franchise – evolve and alter over time, Adam’s work is important for, at least, two reasons: First, Adam’s designs concretely associate in popular culture the relationship between modernist architecture and specific articulations of power. Second, Adam’s designs foreground set design as a site of narrative detail, rather than merely being the place within which the narrative occurs. While these monumental sets were designed to function within an ‘evil’ role and therefore use an architectural language already associated with specific articulations of power, Adam’s set designs also make visible a version of modernist architecture that was attractive and which may have strongly influenced the general public’s perception of modern architecture. Adam’s promotion of modernist architecture through the medium of film establishes a template for the representation of the spaces of power within the spy genre that are, themselves, so powerful that they quickly become the de-facto blueprint for subsequent representations.

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  • Cities of wrecked desire : post-apocalyptic cinema and ruin pornography

    Wilson, Scott (2017-06-02T14:30:05Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ruin pornography – the photographic aestheticization of architectural decay – has a long history in cinema and television and is linked to spectacles of apocalypse and its aftermath. More recently, these representational tropes have become a photographic genre in their own right, highlighting and, perhaps, celebrating urban and industrial decay. While not necessarily emerging from the same apocalyptic events as their fictional counterparts, the fact that similar kinds of formal representational characteristics are repeated between fiction and non-fiction means that those non-fiction, documentary images are interpreted in the same ways as those of the cities of films such as Oblivion (Joseph Kosinski, 2013), After Earth (M. Night Shyamalan, 2013) and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (Matt Reeves, 2014) (amongst many others). As a consequence, it has been claimed that: ... ruin photography and ruin film aestheticizes poverty without inquiring of its origins, dramatizes spaces but never seeks out the people that inhabit and transform them, and romanticizes isolated acts of resistance without acknowledging the massive political and social forces aligned against the real transformation, and not just stubborn survival, of the city (Leary, 2013). This paper will explore the aesthetics of both ruin pornography and post-apocalyptic cinema and television in order to assess the manner in which this form of documentary reportage might or might not succeed in drawing attention to the causes and conditions of urban decay, economic collapse, and the possibility for positive urban and civil reconstruction and outcomes.

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  • Elite Rowers Apply Different Forces Between Stationary and Sliding Ergometers, & On-water Rowing

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Rowing on ergometers is often required due to on-water conditions and testing requirements. Force generation between on-water sculling, fixed and sliding ergometers, has been examined, but there are only a few studies with elite level rowers. Forces at the handle, rowing gate, and foot block were recorded for four elite rowers during 1,000-m on a fixed ergometer, sliding ergometer and an on-water double scull. Handle forces were greater on the fixed and sliding ergometer than the on-water double. There was a trend for the foot forces to be similar between all three conditions. However, the timing of application of force was considerably earlier on the fixed and sliding ergometer than the on-water condition. The use of ergometers as a substitute for on-water rowing needs to be reconsidered in light of these results.

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  • Does a Modified Foot-stretcher Improve 500-m On-water and Ergometer Rowing Performance Time and Comfort?

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Foot-stretcher force contributes to rowing performance. A New Zealand designed modified rowing foot-stretcher has a rigid clog shoe with heel and toe wedges to allow contact of the whole surface of the foot to the foot-plate throughout the entire rowing stroke. This study examined the effect of modified and standard foot-stretchers for eight competitive rowers during on-water double scull and static Concept2 ergometer 500-m rowing. Race time and comfort were recorded. Comfort measures indicated that the modified foot-stretcher was preferred both on-water and ergometer. Performance time measures indicated a potential performance enhancement with the modified foot-stretcher on-water (2.0%), however due to large confidence intervals, the results were unclear. This modified foot-stretcher assisted athletes rowing comfort and showed potential for performance enhancement.

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  • Facilitating vertical integration of knowledge from animal physiology to farm system level

    Matthew, C; Parkinson, T; Kemp, P

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    We describe a teaching methodology evolved over 25 years for taking incoming students with little farming background to near-consultancy level in terms of ability to discuss feed supply and demand manipulation with practicing farmers. The methodology is currently used in a double semester course offering to 2nd year BVSc students at Massey University with positive feedback from students. Component skills such as visual assessment of herbage mass are introduced at the outset. A keystone of the methodology is the provision of student operated 'farmlets' with 16 sheep on 0.8 ha, where the storage of autumn-surplus feed as increased herbage mass, and release back to animals for winter and early lactation feed is demonstrated. Feed budget calculations for these farmlets in units of MJ metabolisable energy and kg pasture DM/ha/ day promote understanding of animal physiology principles and simulate those of a larger scale commercial farm. As currently offered the module comprises 20 lectures and 5 organised 2 hour farmlet discussion and data collection visits. Students complete additional farmlet work in their own time, such as moving or weighing sheep. Two written assignments promote integration of component knowledge and ownership of that information by participants.

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  • Water quality, metagenomics and the microbial community in DOC campground water

    Phiri, BJ; Biggs, PJ; Rainey, PB; Stevenson, MA; Prattley, DJ; French, NP

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Improving memory in midlife: A multiple case study evaluation of a group-based memory programme for healthy middle-aged individuals

    Scheibner, G; Leathem, JM

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Background • The literature shows that significant memory decline begins during midlife which is usually defined as the period of life between of 40-65 years of age. • 40 % of middle-aged people report everyday forgetfulness (Ponds, Commissaris, & Jolles, 1997). • More than half of these people perceive their forgetfulness as a hindrance in their daily live. • 70% of individuals in this age-group have expressed worries about their increasing forgetfulness (Commissaris, Ponds, & Jolles, 1998). • Memory interventions though are usually intended for individuals who are older than 65 years of age with mild to moderate memory impairment or for people with recognised neurological conditions such as TBI.

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  • Communication about communication: Theory and research on early communication development in the last 40 years

    Lock, AJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Different needs - Different interventions (stand in keynote)

    Olsen, KB

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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