1,377 results for Conference paper

  • How do you like your BIM?

    McGarrigle, Malachy (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper’s objective is to investigate what practitioners across various disciplines in NZ construction including academia expect to find in BIM models. What specific information do they actually want from models and can this be provided in reality? Traditionally building designers received and developed client briefs to help produce successful designs but it seems not enough time is spent presently at BIM briefing stages determining what information is explicitly required from digital models, producing frustrating results for end users expecting to find selective, productive information embedded therein. This situation arises in academia also where some BIM endeavours investigate its’ potential as an educational tool. However, if lecturing colleagues fail to adequately brief model authors on how the final model will be used pedagogically, it will inevitably fail to benefit teaching as envisaged. At the moment it appears not enough BIM briefing is actually taking place across the New Zealand construction industry nor sufficient use made of published guidance. Helping people better express their BIM requirements at briefing stage, exploring their feasibility for present and future work roles should result in more effective briefing of BIM authoring colleagues. Hopefully leading to more valuable, information rich models benefitting the entire construction sector.

    View record details
  • The use of big data and HRIS by HR practitioners in New Zealand: empirical evidence from a longitudinal study

    Du Plessis, Andries; Fourie, Leon (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper stems from a longitudinal research project over twenty years. The influence of ‘Big Data’ on the HR practitioner’s roles, goals and activities is huge in how their function is creating and adding value to the organisation. Big data offers HRM major opportunities to increase its value add in more functions and areas of HR as well as the strategic influence within the organisation, by delivering predictive analytics. HR practitioners in New Zealand have been exposed to big data and the use thereof through their HRISs. The quantitative methodology adopted was an e-survey; a questionnaire containing structured closed questions. The target population was limited to HRINZ members that had registered to participate in HR research requests that HRINZ provided links to; the total number of HRINZ members in this category was 635. Fundamental capabilities of the HRIS should be used to assist in delivering ultimate customer service and a good service to their employees. Concrete recommendations are proposed for HR practitioners and managers in the use of big data such as to use analysts to analyse the big data for them so that it becomes useable as knowledge to make wise decisions in future. Recommendations and the conclusion form the last two sections.

    View record details
  • Biculturalism in New Zealand correctional facilities

    Laidlaw, Reagan; Schnoor, Christoph (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In New Zealand architecture, notions of biculturalism have been addressed in a slowly increasing manner over the past 30 years. But has architecture in New Zealand taken these notions seriously in institutions, such as correctional facilities, as well? The introduction of the term biculturalism was first linked to New Zealand architecture during the 1970s. This was a period where the significance of Māori art and culture was becoming apparent in New Zealand. This was due largely in part to the migration of Māori from rural areas to the cities, prior to the 1980s, which also coincided with an overall increase in the Māori population. Some bicultural ideas have been incorporated into New Zealand architecture, and this can be seen through notable examples such as John Scott’s Futuna Chapel (1961) and the Māori Battalion Building (1964), however, biculturalism is only recently being seen in institutional architecture around New Zealand. Correctional facilities Ngawha (2005) and Spring Hill Corrections Facility (2007) by Stephenson & Turner have incorporated spatial and design qualities into their designs which are intended to rehabilitate inmates through directly relating to their cultures and beliefs to engage mental, physical and spiritual recovery. This paper suggests that the marae, the traditional Māori meeting house (as one of the few stable remnants of Māori culture over the centuries), has had an effect on the development of bicultural notions in New Zealand prisons. Building on an historical overview of bicultural aspects over the last 150 years, this paper focuses on the recent prison design of Ngawha in Northland in order to trace how notions of biculturalism have been addressed, taking into account the importance of the marae for Māori culture.

    View record details
  • Ernst Plischke and the Dixon Street Flats

    Schnoor, Christoph (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ernst Plischke’s life and work have been thoroughly researched and written about. However, one crucial moment still remains uncertain – and it seems that, for New Zealand Architectural History, much hinges on this one uncertain episode: the project in question is the first high-rise housing block in Wellington of 1942, the Dixon Street Flats. New Zealand-based architectural historians have spent much time and effort to establish the facts, asking: was the project mainly designed by Ernst Plischke, or by the Head of the Department of Housing Construction, Gordon Wilson? Linda Tyler did not question Plischke’s version of the events. Later, Robin Skinner has argued one way, Julia Gatley the other way. It is Plischke’s position within the Department of Housing Construction that is the cause for this uncertainty. As the department’s head, Gordon Wilson was responsible for the buildings designed in the department. And as such, he received a New Zealand Institute of Architects Gold Medal for the Dixon Street Flats in 1947. The bigger issue behind this one event is whether modernist architecture in New Zealand did develop from ‘within’ or whether it was mostly introduced via the input from European emigrants, specifically Ernst Plischke. Through the study of private archival material and through the revisiting of published and unpublished material, this paper extends the current knowledge on the circumstances of the designs of the Dixon Street Flats and other projects by the Department of Housing construction, thus adding to the larger lines of development of modern architecture in New Zealand, and to aspects of Ernst Plischke’s involvement with the project of state modernisation in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Effect of WPA2 Security on IEEE 802.11n bandwidth and round trip time in peer-peer wireless local area networks

    Li, Peng; Kolahi, Samad; Safdari, Mustafa; Argawe, Mulugeta (2011-03-22)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper 802.11 wireless peer-peer network is evaluated for both IPv4 and IPv6 in Windows 7 and Fedora 12 operating systems. IPv4 has higher throughput than IPv6 for all packet sizes for both Windows 7 and Fedora 12 operating systems. Results further indicate that implementing WPA2 wireless security reduces bandwidth and increase delay in wireless networks.

    View record details
  • Ensemble learning methods for decision making : status and future prospects

    Ali, Shahid; Tirumala, Sreenivas Sremath; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2015-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In real world situations every model has some weaknesses and will make errors on training data. Given the fact that each model has certain limitations, the aim of ensemble learning is to supervise their strengths and weaknesses, leading to best possible decision in general. Ensemble based machine learning is a solution of minimizing risk in decision making. Bagging, boosting, stacked generalization and mixture of expert methods are the most popular techniques to construct ensemble systems. For the purpose of combining outputs of class labels, weighted majority voting, behaviour knowledge space and border count methods are used to construct independent classifiers and to achieve diversity among the classifiers which is important in ensemble learning. It was found that an ideal ensemble method should work on the principle of achieving six paramount characteristics of ensemble learning; accuracy, scalability, computational cost, usability, compactness and speed of classification. In addition, the ideal ensemble method would be able to handle large huge image size and long term historical data particularly of spatial and temporal. In this paper we reveal that ensemble models have obtained high acceptability in terms of accuracy than single models. Further, we present an analogy of various ensemble techniques, their applicability, measuring the solution diversity, challenges and proposed methods to overcome these challenges without diverting from the original concepts.

    View record details
  • The Whakarare Typeface Project : when culture-specific design brings elements of universal value

    Witehira, Johnson; Trapani, Paola (2015-11)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper presents a reflection on the design of the Whakarare typeface created by Johnson Witehira, a Māori visual designer. In this research Witehira was interested in exploring two areas of inquiry: customary Māori knowledge as a source of inspiration for contemporary Māori design, and Māori typography as a means of cultural resistance through engagement with post-colonial discourse. Starting with the observation that there are no authentic Māori typefaces, designed by Māori for Māori communities, Witehira traces the kaupapa Māori design process in which Māori cosmo-genealogy is transformed into structural characteristics of the Whakarare typeface. In Māori history, the world was created when the children of Ranginui (sky-father) and Papatūānuku (earth-mother), forcibly push their parents apart. The second part of the paper is a reflection on the “universal value” of such a design. Here we explore what kinds of ideas can be conveyed in different cultural contexts without loss, and what ideas are likely to be overlooked because of their cultural specificity. While the Whakarare typeface is designed to be Māori-centric, the authors demonstrate how the problem of designing forms that express the concept of compression and crushing, as a status immediately preceding an explosive expansion, is not specific to the Māori culture. Every designer in the world would face the same design challenge in a completely different context. The ability to design a form capable of generating that perception in the observer is not a trivial or easy task. On the contrary, its solution requires a very advanced knowledge of the psychology of perception and therefore has a universal, rather than local, significance.

    View record details
  • ETL tools for data warehousing : an empirical study of open source Talend Studio versus Microsoft SSIS

    Katragadda, Ranjith; Tirumala, Sreenivas Sremath; Nandigam, David (2015-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Relational databases are bound to follow various database integrity rules and constraints that makes the reporting a time consuming process. Data Warehousing has evolved out of the desperate need for easy access to structured storage of quality data that can be used for effective decision making. Data are turned into knowledge and knowledge into plans which are instrumental in profitable business decision making. To serve this purpose, data need to be extracted from various sources, transformed and loaded into the data warehouse which constitute the process of ETL (Extract, Transform and Load). ETL process can be accomplished using various tools both open source and proprietary. In this paper, we provide an empirical study of two ETL tools, an open source Talend Studio and Microsoft SSIS. In spite of the dominance among a vast majority of computer software solutions, open source technologies, as the comparative analysis that this study has undertaken, concludes that open sources tools are yet to evolve in order to be sustainable

    View record details
  • Teaching computer programming with a coaching mindset

    Rahman, Naseem; Nandigam, David; Tirumala, Sreenivas Sremath (2015-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Teaching computer programming with the coaching mindset assumes an inherent knowledge on part of the learner. Conversely learning is efficient when novices learn from people who already mastered the craft. In this paper we redefine computing teacher as a Coach, an extension to the cognitive teaching model based on a set of values and practices that emphasize a radical model of student-teacher relationship. The proposed model resulted in a significant improvement in the confidence and skill levels of beginner students which reflected in their pass rate as well as arrested dropout tendencies. Further, we describe the coaching paradigm in the context of cognitive teaching model proposed by Maslow as the most efficient method of teaching programming.

    View record details
  • The Garden City of the 21st century

    Bradbury, Matthew (2002-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2014 the prestigious Wolfson Economics Prize (2014) was awarded to David Rudlin of URBED, for answering the question “How would you deliver a new Garden City which is visionary, economically viable, and popular?” The British Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne announced in 2014 that the first new garden city for 100 years will be constructed at Ebbbsfleet (2015) in Kent, UK, to provide 15,000 homes. These two projects strongly suggest the power that Ebenezer Howard’s (Howard, 1902) original concept of Garden City still has. Yet even a cursory inspection of the two projects and the current debate in the UK show little new, unlike the radical combination of working and living within a hybrid of garden and countryside that Howard originally advanced. This paper suggests a way in which landscape architects can frame the renewed interest in the Garden City by building on the tradition of Howard’s radical inquiry. Taking a combination of techniques from environmental planning and traditional garden making the author develops a planning methodology to demonstrate how a new new garden city might be built. The paper is illustrated by two case studies designed by the author; the design of a resort in Guangdong Province, PR China [Beixing Resort Development] and a subdivision in Auckland New Zealand. [Paramuka Valley Subdivision, West Auckland] GIS mapping is used as a planning tool to analyse the sites through the mapping of important environmental features such as remnant indigenous vegetation and overland flow paths. A complex dialogue between the remediation of a native ecology through the preservation and reinstatement of indigenous hydrology and the preservation and replanting of native eco tones is developed. At the same time garden making procedures are deployed, the introduction of exotic species and the deliberate and artificial manipulation of topography. An architectural programme is introduced into this complex landscape conversation, not as an assembly of building types, but rather as a collection of social desires, a gradient from private to public space mediated through the landscape. The result is a new kind of garden city that develops an innovative social realm for the citizens, one in which a connection and awareness of the sustainable environment is central to a new garden city.

    View record details
  • HRM in relation to employee motivation and job performance in the hospitality industry

    Du Plessis, Andries; Douangphichit, Nalinh; Dodd, Patrick (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The hospitality industry refers to organisations that provide accommodation and food services for people when they travel. The hospitality industry is also known as a “people business”. The hotels and catering organisations underperform, still deliver inadequate services, and provide limited facilities compared to similar businesses in the same region. This can have a negative impact on the tourism industry in Laos. HRM potentially contributes to employee work performance in the organisation. The performance of employees in hotel organisations can be judged or measured by their attentiveness, their friendliness, their appearances, their attitudes, and the way they carry out and perform their assigned tasks. Most of the respondents feel that their organisations create the conditions whereby they are motivated to work harder. The hotel industry recognises the importance of training in relation to their work performed. The main factor that brings about high level of job satisfaction and motivation is salary.

    View record details
  • Perceptions of older international tertiary students towards the sustainable future environment in New Zealand

    Theron, Bernhardett; Du Plessis, Andries; Toh, William; Sabarwal, Anu (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Sustainability refers to utilising the earth’s natural resources wisely to meet the necessities of lives but also to save the resources for future generations to survive. This research investigated perceptions of international students towards conservation and sustainable living at an international tertiary institution, UUNZ, in Auckland New Zealand. A quantitative method was applied; 92 questionnaires were distributed. The research aims to establish what international students’ attitudes and perception towards sustainability and the environment are; a correlation between age, nationality, religion and their perceptions towards sustainable living. The results revealed a negative correlation between students’ concern and perception towards sustainability and an increase in age (age 40 and older); a decrease in sustainable living. Recommendations form the last section.

    View record details
  • Swarm planning : development of generative spatial planning tool for resilient cities

    Roggema, Rob; Popov, Nikolay (2015-09)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In dealing with unexpected impacts of climate change current spatial planning tools are irresponsive and inflexible. The outcomes of applications of these tools are very limited in number, producing static plans that if implemented are very vulnerable to climate hazards. Therefore, an innovative generative tool has been developed to support spatial planning which results in designs that are responsive and adjustable to unexpected, simulated changes. The development of the generative tool is informed by swarm planning theory, and by contemporary generative approaches in urban design and planning. The generative tool is modeled as an Agent-Based System and utilizes versions of the canonical flocking algorithm. The agents are abstract cubical units of space that represent building envelopes. The agents exist and work within an environment that represents a site in terms of topography, land value, and available/buildable land. The agents receive information from the environment and act upon this information. The unexpected climate impact is a simulated flood, which affects both the environment and the agents. The outputs of the tool are generated 'bottom-up' in order to study emergent spatial configurations, as massings of building units.

    View record details
  • 'Same, same, but different' : a comparison of rationales between historic and contemporary school garden development

    Wake, Sue (2015-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    School gardening projects are on the rise and as the current school garden movement reaches into its third decade, this is an opportune time to consider the involvement of Landscape Architects (LAs). As design specialists of outdoor spaces and environments they may be well positioned to consult and assist with designs that meet the educational, social and maintenance needs of schools. This is especially the case since school gardens have been proposed as a panacea for a number of concerns adults have towards modern-day children, including environmental education, healthy eating, spending time in nature and getting exercise outside. Yet, interrogation of the history of school gardens reveals a paucity of their involvement then, as now. The school garden movement of the early twentieth century boomed, then bust with amazing rapidity, leaving behind a legacy among pupils of memories that were often not fond. These gardens were utilitarian and focused on production – often having a militaristic edge, as exemplified by the US School Garden Army. While they met the need of the era, they also strongly represented the adult agendas that drove them. Equally, the current movement is also driven by agendas, some the same and some different. This paper uses the colloquial saying ‘same same, but different’ to reflect the similarity of the situation between the school garden movements of the 20th and 21st centuries – both in terms of the agendas behind them and the involvement of LAs. Its aim is to argue that greater involvement of LAs could optimise the learning potential of school gardens and therefore help to prevent repetition of the demise of school gardens, which are needed more than ever.

    View record details
  • Effective motivation practices that could enhance employee performance in the mining industry

    Du Plessis, Andries; Keovilay, Phaivone; Marriott, Jeff; Seth, Nitin (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    HR is the most important resources in any organisation. The goals of the company are: increase profitability, enhance quality and innovation; in contrast with the objectives of employees: increasing wages and improving working conditions. Tension between employees and employers affect the performance of individuals thus affecting the growth of the company. HRM plays a crucial role motivating employees for peak performance, improving the relationships between employees and employers. Low levels of motivation are unclear in the mining sector; this paper investigates through qualitative approach, the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that motivate employees to enhance their work performance and found five main factors that motivate most employees: remuneration, safety, social, supervision and equity. Recommendations are made to enhance employees’ performance. Problem statement; The problem is that some employees in the mining sector have low motivation levels to perform according to the company’s goals and it is unclear how to identify what it takes to influence employees in the mining industry to be more active and to use their utmost potential to accomplish company goals. It is important for management teams in the mining sector to determine solutions to improve their employee performances. The research seeks answers to the main research question: “What are the motivational factors that would influence Lao employees to enhance their work performance in the mining industry in Lao PDR?”

    View record details
  • SME brand management : a lack of business skills, financial support and human resources

    Du Plessis, Andries; Indavong, Somchay; Marriott, Jeff (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Brand management is a means to building a strong brand and enhancing business performance. This research project aimed to investigate how brand management is exercised in SMEs in Laos especially in the handicrafts sector and to identify obstacles in building a successful brand for the SMEs. This study employed a semi-structured interview as a data collection method for a qualitative research approach. A total of 10 participants were interviewed in Laos. The study has found that SMEs in Laos create their brand identity through the visions and values of business owners. Unique and quality of the products and the country of origin are the key aspects for building and developing brand identity. A majority of the SME entrepreneurs do not have particular knowledge relating to branding and brand management. The SMEs still face a number of difficulties when creating, developing and managing their brands due to a scarcity of budget and a lack of human resources.

    View record details
  • Designing mobile applications for smoking cessation in New Zealand

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Wu, Lian; Casey, John; Biddle, TeUrikore (2016-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Tobacco is a leading cause of preventable death in New Zealand. The smoking rate for New Zealand Māori was 44 percent in 2009, still significantly higher than for non-Māori (18 percent) for both males and females. In this research project, a novel mobile application (SmokefreeNZ) has been designed and developed, which can provide two way interactions between the server and client, whereas traditional text interventions only provide one-way communication (from server to client). This novel approach integrates interactive Mobile Technology, Social Psychology, Persuasive Technology and Behavioural Therapy to deliver personalised content in both English and Te Reo Māori, which is designed to encourage and help individual smokers to quit smoking. It serves as a tool and platform to rouse and maintain the desire and motivation to quit smoking. It is also capable of delivering tailored multimedia content to smokers from different cultural backgrounds, and will provide a clear goal for the quit attempt, maintaining the salience and reward value of making progress towards that goal. It can also use evidence based methods of reducing the desire and impulses to smoke. Currently a cased-controlled trial is undergoing to further investigate the effectiveness of the app as an intervention tool.

    View record details
  • Immigrant entrepreneurs and their perceived success in small retail businesses : preliminary New Zealand findings

    Nel, Pieter; Abdullah, Moha (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    As international migration continues to be a significant force in globalization, some migrants are forced by circumstances to migrate. Others are attracted by the prospects of greater economic, social, and educational opportunities for themselves and their families. Whilst many migrants take up positions in paid employment, a considerable proportion of them migrate specifically to initiate new venture start-up activities. This study highlights preliminary findings on attributes and essential elements of immigrant entrepreneurs, their issues and how they perceived their business success in small retail business. A survey comprising 262 immigrant entrepreneur respondents in Auckland, New Zealand was executed. The study found that about 40 percent had prior business experience before migrating to New Zealand with more than 30 percent migrating with a business visa. An ANOVA test conducted confirms that there are certain issues such as local business regulations, access to capital, advisory services, training facilities and access to suppliers that are important factors contributing to the perceived business success among immigrant entrepreneurs. The outcome of the study will help the training and development authorities to take the necessary steps to outline a new and productive content for potential entrepreneurial development.

    View record details
  • Social media usage by academics : some comparisons from a developing country and developed countries’ perspectives

    Nel, Pieter (2016-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Academics and students across the globe are increasingly using social media and social connections for educational purposes. This paper focusses on a comparison of particular countries regarding the use of social media in teaching by academics and whether they can utilize this platform for effective communication to engage students in learning activities as well. The objective is to identify the usage of social media tools by academics by comparing a multi developed country study (comprising the UK, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Continental Europe and Canada) and a separate developing country study being South Africa. The data was obtained by using SurveyMonkey and executed during 2014 at tertiary educational institutions. For the developing country 204 usable responses were obtained and 711 responses from the developed countries. Suggestions are made regarding the educational environment using social media tools. It is concluded that academics are communicating with students in a positive way via the use of social media tools for educational purposes, but that much scope exists to improve the use of social media for educational purposes by academics. There are also some differences in the use of social media by academics when comparing the developing country and developed countries.

    View record details
  • The adoption of modern office workspaces by tertiary education institutes : a case study of Unitec

    Vitasovich, A.; Kiroff, Lydia; Boon, John (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Modern office workspaces, and particularly activity-based workspaces (ABW) are emerging in the education sector. The primary reasons for making changes to workspaces vary from institute to institute. Yet, there is limited research on the objectives, the overall value of making these changes, the strategic plans used, the types of workspaces being implemented and the issues faced by higher education institutes, which can potentially affect their users and their associated work practices. Semi-structured in-depth interviews within a case study approach were carried out with three groups of participants: staff that have had previous experience in new types of workspaces, staff that have not worked in such environments, and institutional key decision-makers. Field observations and a review of supporting documentation complemented the interviews. The findings indicate that there are wide-ranging organisational changes occurring within Unitec, and not just simple changes to existing workspaces with the aim of increasing collaboration, reducing facility costs and creating sector alignment. Additionally, ABW are being implemented throughout the organisation based on prototype office spaces in one campus building heavily influenced by commercial workspace design. However, higher academic work practices make unique demands potentially creating tension between the aims of the institution for increased collaboration and interaction and established work patterns. The inclusion of more private quiet spaces is suggested by the interviewees to help staff adapt to these new ways of working. Furthermore, keeping the lines of communication open and regularly updating all staff on the redevelopment of the new workspaces ensures an overall smoother transition.

    View record details