1,515 results for Conference paper

  • Improving memory in midlife: A multiple case study evaluation of a group-based memory programme for healthy middle-aged individuals

    Scheibner, G; Leathem, JM

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Background • The literature shows that significant memory decline begins during midlife which is usually defined as the period of life between of 40-65 years of age. • 40 % of middle-aged people report everyday forgetfulness (Ponds, Commissaris, & Jolles, 1997). • More than half of these people perceive their forgetfulness as a hindrance in their daily live. • 70% of individuals in this age-group have expressed worries about their increasing forgetfulness (Commissaris, Ponds, & Jolles, 1998). • Memory interventions though are usually intended for individuals who are older than 65 years of age with mild to moderate memory impairment or for people with recognised neurological conditions such as TBI.

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  • Communication about communication: Theory and research on early communication development in the last 40 years

    Lock, AJ

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Different needs - Different interventions (stand in keynote)

    Olsen, KB

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Embodiment, gender and drinking in midlife

    Lyons, AC; Emslie, C; Hunt, K

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Rate Equation Analysis of Frequency Chirp in Optically Injection-Locked Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Wang, C; Grillot, F; Kovanis, VI; Bodyfelt, JD; Even, J

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Published

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  • Adjusting for the cognitive effects of normal aging in the work place

    Leathem, JM

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Currently 14% of people in NZ are aged 65 years or older, with that figure projected to increase to almost one million people – 25% of population - by 2026. One fifth of these people are currently in employment and this is projected to increase to 35% by 2020. By 2036, people 65+ will represent 9-15% of labour force or 240,000-500,000 of the population (Statistics NZ 2012). The largest growth will be in the next 20 years. There are a number of cognitive changes associated with increasing age. This will mean that people over 65 years will be working with attention, learning, memory and information speed that is slower or lower than in their earlier years. They will be wiser but slower. The implications for this for the work force and strategies for compensating for the changes will be illustrated through case studies.

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  • Insight, hindsight & foresight: functional foods, probiotics & the consumer

    Boland, MJ; Bunting, H; Grigor, J; Chamberlain, K

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Monitors or certifiers? Different roles of private equity firms at different timing of investments

    Hsu, WH; Young, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    This paper examines the market response to the announcements of receiving investments from the private equity (PE) firms. It is found that the positive market reaction is due to the certification effect that the PE firms may have inside information about the company value. This insider hypothesis is also found in the subsample of repeated investments: market reacts positively when the underperformed companies receive funding from the same PE firms again. On the other hand, when the companies receive investments from the PE firms for the first time, the investors recognises the monitoring role of the PE investors as well as their certification role.

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  • Taxonomy of malware detection techniques

    Mohaddes Deylami, H.; Muniyandi, R. C.; Ardekani, Iman; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2017-05-23T14:30:04Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Malware is an international software disease. Research shows that the effect of malware is becoming chronic. To protect against malware detectors are fundamental to the industry. The effectiveness of such detectors depends on the technology used. Therefore, it is paramount that the advantages and disadvantages of each type of technology are scrutinized analytically. This study’s aim is to scrutinize existing publications on this subject and to follow the trend that has taken place in the advancement and development with reference to the amount of information and sources of such literature. Many of the malware programs are huge and complicated and it is not easy to comprehend the details. Dissemination of malware information among users of the Internet and also training them to correctly use anti-malware products are crucial to protecting users from the malware onslaught. This paper will provide an exhaustive bibliography of methods to assist in combating malware.

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  • Human action recognition by conceptual features

    Shamsipour, G.; Shanbehzadeh, J.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2017-06-01T14:30:08Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Human action recognition is the process of labeling a video according to human behavior. This process requires a large set of labeled video and analyzing all the frames of a video. The consequence is high computation and memory requirement. This paper solves these problems by focusing on a limited set rather than all the human action and considering the human-object interaction. This paper employs three randomly selected video frames instead of employing all the frames and, Convolutional Neural Network extracts conceptual features and recognize the video objects. Finally, support vector machine determines the relation between these objects and labels the video. The proposed method have been tested on two popular datasets ; UCF Sports Action and Olympic Sports. The results show improvements over state-of-the-art algorithms. This work is the outcome of Shamsipour's M.Sc thesis at Kharazmi University.

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  • Bionic voice (pilot study) : natural speech restoration for voice impaired individuals

    Sharifzadeh, Hamid; Allen, Jacqui; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein; Ardekani, Iman (2016-11)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The human voice is the most magnificent instrument for communication, capable of expressing deep emotions, conveying oral history through generations, or of starting a war. However, those who suffer from aphonia (no voice) and dysphonia (voice disorders) are unable to make use of this critical form of communication. They are typically unable to project anything more than hoarse whispers. Epidemiologic studies of the prevalence of voice disorders in the general adult population are rare. Nevertheless, information from a number of studies suggests that one third of the population have suffered from a temporary vocal impairment at some point in their life and that voice disorders can affect any age group and either sex. In some cases, vocal change is temporary however in those treated for malignant disease or with severe trauma there may be long term disturbance of phonation. This may affect occupation, social function and quality of life. Within a speech processing framework, we have worked on a novel method to return natural voice to laryngectomised people. This method leverages on recent advances in speech synthesis to deliver aworld-first technology. As a pilot study, this project has assessed the acoustic features of laryngectomised speech and has developed required enhancement for natural speech regeneration.

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  • Noise removal and binarization of scanned document images using clustering of features

    Farahmand, A.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein; Shanbehzadeh, J. (2017-06-01T14:30:13Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Old documents are in printed form. Their archiving and retrieval is expensive according in terms of space requirement and physical search. One solution is to convert these documents into electronic form using scanners. The outputs of scanners are images contaminated with noise. The outcomes are more storage requirement and low OCR accuracy. A solution is noise reduction. This paper employs KFCM algorithm to cluster pixels into text, background and noise according to their features. As a result, noise removal and binarization is done simultaneously.

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  • Collaborative working to overcome barriers to active transport: learning from a living lab

    Cheyne, CM; Muhammad, I

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Everyday cognitive failures and memory compensation efforts: A selective optimization with compensation (SOC) Analysis

    Scheibner, G; Leathem, JM

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The theory of Selective Optimization with Compensation (SOC) outlines how individuals may adapt more or less successfully to aging-related changes. Controlling for age, gender, education, and subjective health, the present study examined the relationships between cognitive failures and the SOC life management strategies. Results of this online survey (N = 409) indicated that SOC endorsement accounted for a significant reduction in each of the facets of the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (i.e., forgetfulness, distractibility, and false triggering). Additional hypotheses tested whether mood may have a moderating effect on the beneficial effects of SOC, and whether SOC endorsement may moderate individual's efforts to compensate for perceived memory impairments. Results suggest that low mood attenuates the beneficial effects that SOC has on the frequency of cognitive failures. Counter to expectations, SOC endorsement did not affect the forgetfulness/memory compensation relationship. Results are discussed in view of methodological limitations and suggestions for future research are outlined.

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  • Identifying grass species using hyperspectral sensing. In: Integrated nutrient and water management for sustainable farming

    Cushnahan, T; Yule, IJ; Pullanagari, RR; Grafton, MCE

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Interactions Destroy Dynamical Localization with Strong & Weak Chaos

    Bodyfelt, JD; Flach, S; Gligoric, G

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Clinical decision making among sexual abuse counsellors working with child and adult survivors of sexual abuse: A New Zealand study

    Woolley, CC; Craven, G; Dickson, J; Evans, I

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Providing therapy for child and adult sexual abuse survivors is a complex area of therapeutic practice. A nationwide survey was undertaken in order to investigate the decision-making processes of practitioners working with child abuse survivors. Forty-one child-focussed practitioners and 113 adult-focussed practitioners responded to open-ended questions about indicators of sexual abuse, and the factors informing their therapeutic decisions. Thematic analysis of their responses indicated nine themes: indicators of sexual abuse, safety, need for disclosure, the therapeutic process, working with emotions and behaviours, taking a developmental approach, influence and involvement of the family, working with external agencies, and intuition and experience versus evidence-based decisions. How these themes inform decisions made by practitioners and their implications for strengthening clinical judgement through professional development is discussed. In addition, the implications of these findings and their potential to enhance the psychotherapy training needs of clinical psychologists will be discussed.

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  • "A thorn in the side": Near-death experiences and consciousness

    Tassell-Matamua, N

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Wind energy scoping

    Murray, PE

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Interventions for children’s dental anxiety: Validating a coping styles scale

    Williams, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Dental anxiety is a widespread phenomenon with deleterious oral health correlates. Consideration of variation in coping styles may be useful in the selection of effective dental anxiety interventions. Miller (1981, 1987) defined two key modalities for coping with threatening information: monitoring (attending to threatening information) and blunting (avoiding threatening information). This study will report on the New Zealand validation of a measure of children's monitoring-blunting copying styles in dental situations (the MBDS) in a sample of 240 New Zealand children aged 11-13 years. Internal consistency reliability and convergent validity with respect to a related scale wre adequate for both the monitoring and blunting subscales, although discriminant validity with regard to dental anxiety was weak for the blunting subscale. Use of a scale such as the MBDS may be one way in which dental staff can bring children's preferred copying styles into consideration when formulating interventions to manage dental anxiety.

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