1,479 results for Conference paper

  • Field Study for Evaluating Winter Thermal Performance of Auckland School Buildings

    Su, Bin (2015-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Auckland has a temperate climate with comfortable warm, dry summers and mild, wet winters. An Auckland school normally does not need air conditioning for cooling during the summer and only needs heating during the winter. The Auckland school building thermal design should more focus on winter thermal performance and indoor thermal comfort for energy efficiency. This field study of testing indoor and outdoor air temperatures, relative humidity and indoor surface temperatures of three classrooms with different envelopes were carried out in the Avondale College during the winter months in 2013. According to the field study data, this study is to compare and evaluate winter thermal performance and indoor thermal conditions of school buildings with different envelopes.

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  • Embedding indigenous knowledge in the crowded space of a tertiary institution

    Keelan, Josie (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In keeping with the tradition of my people I acknowledge the indigenous people of Australia, and their ancestors all of whom have maintained the spirit of the land through the generations and will continue to do so going forward. I acknowledge other indigenous people who have travelled to the conference from the four winds. And I acknowledge there will be those at the conference who would challenge the notion of who indigenous people are. So for my purposes in the presentation, I will be referring to those who had the first communion with the land; who made the first lores and laws; who spoke the first language of the land; who designed the first cultures; who built the first abodes; who first interacted with the native flora and fauna; whose blood was first spilt on the land; who created the first learning systems; whose struggle today is to be heard when the noise of ‘the other’ is so loud it leaves no room for anyone else. Embedding indigenous knowledge into curriculum that does not have its foundation in that knowledge is a challenge many indigenous groups around the world face when invited and being allowed into the tertiary space usually after some time fighting for that right. The challenge being faced extends to the delivery of student support services and the governance and management, processes and practices of the tertiary institution. The issue is one of demonstrating the relevance of indigenous knowledge in a multicultural context where the dominant culture believes their knowledge system delivers to all when evidence clearly shows this not to be the case. The intent in this presentation is to demonstrate that when an effort is made to improve the delivery of services to indigenous students, all students benefit. The presentation will focus on Māori students in Aotearoa New Zealand and the work being done at Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec) to embed mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) in curriculum and the way in which the Institute does its business. Student support services are seen as an integral part of that conversation rather than separate from it. In 2010 Unitec adopted a Māori Success Strategy with implementation of that strategy beginning in 2011. The investment in that strategy is beginning to show results. The next challenge for the Institute will be in maintaining those outcomes once the official success, retention and completion statistics, which are the only measures government is interested in, have reached parity with non-Māori. The presence of international students is one of the many ways in which challenges to the inclusion of indigenous knowledge is presented. That is, indigenous knowledge is of no relevance to international students because they want a course of study that is the same as that which is available elsewhere in the world – a rather limiting idea of what education is about nevertheless an argument I have heard many a time from non-Māori. The reply to such a challenge is that international students can benefit hugely from the indigenous theories, models and frameworks. Additionally, the inclusion of indigenous knowledge can challenge their perceptions of the world and often strengthens their own identity. It can of course also challenge their own and their country’s ideological stand on the place of indigenous people and that can be scary. There are ways in which Māori knowledge is being made available to international students other than in the classroom and at least one case study on how a university in Auckland is doing this will be presented. The presentation therefore is about ways of moving forward whilst acknowledging the barriers that exist. Tihe mauriora (I sneeze and therefore I am)!

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  • Shades of Grey 2.0: Ethics Education Gaming

    Oldfield, James; McKnight, Carol; Goundar, Nadesa; Stewart, James; Slessor, Andrew (2014-09-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The Shades of Grey education game is a team-based game that students play in a class lecturers to easily add gaming elements to their lessons. Shades of Grey is used as a mechanism to encourage the student discussion and debate of the ethical issues raised in a series of ethically challenging situations. It is expected that this will increase student engagement with the subject matter and participation in discussion. Since the initial development and testing of the Shades of Grey game (SoG) prototype in 2010 there has been significant change in the availability and capability of mobile devices in the classroom. More students are equipped with smart mobile devices, wireless networking technology is improving and technologies such as HTML5 are helping to improve cross platform internet experiences. With these changes in mind, the Shades of Grey research team have sought an internal research grant to fund the re-development of the game to make use of the mobile devices that students bring with them and to make it easier for teaching staff to customise the game for their own needs. An enhanced second version of the game has been developed and to date has been trialled in an advanced auditing course in semester two 2014. Students who played the game were given the opportunity to participate in the study of SoG by completing a questionnaire. Findings from the questionnaire were used to uncover the perceptions of students towards the game which were overwhelmingly positive. These perceptions will be used in conjunction with the facilitator's observations to inform future development and the potential for its continued use in the programme and beyond. This presentation reports on those findings and the future of the Shades of Grey education game.

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  • Integrating mobile technologies into the construction classroom: Drivers and constraints for ubiquitous computing.

    Davies, Kathryn; Prigg, Chris (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Within Unitec Institute of Technology, the Department of Construction is currently planning the introduction of mandatory use of laptops or other mobile devices within the Bachelor of Construction programme. This paper explores the principal drivers and constraints around formal integration of mobile technologies, also referred to as ubiquitous computing, into the construction teaching environment. Many studies investigating the impacts of mobile technologies have identified benefits to students from their use in the classroom. These stem partly from the skills developed by the students from exposure to technology as well as from specific software and applications related to the subject matter involved. In addition, however, there are potentially significant gains to be made in student engagement and active learning, student directed learning and collaborative and group learning. All of these aspects support the Unitec Living Curriculum model. In contrast, unstructured or unmanaged use of technology in class has been shown to cause significant problems in student attention, disruption to other students and to be generally detrimental to learning. Interviews with staff and students indicate that there is strong support for such a move, but a number of concerns have also been identified that require resolution before any such change can be fully implemented. Key limiting factors include the provision of devices and specification of minimum standards; infrastructure including wireless capacity and room design; and staff access to technology and development opportunities. On the positive side, cloud computing offers significant potential for enhanced computing power and consistency in classroom applications.

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  • Quantity surveyors perceptions of the role and capability of tertiary education in New Zealand

    Baker, C.; Davies, Kathryn (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Although in the past there have been various pathways into the Quantity Surveying profession in New Zealand, the most common route currently is through a Diploma or Degree in Quantity Surveying or Construction Economics. Tertiary courses seek to instil the fundamental skills and knowledge that are needed within the Quantity Surveying profession, which are then developed throughout an individual’s career. However, the adequacy of education for the profession is frequently questioned by practitioners, and there is ongoing debate about the role of tertiary courses and their ability to deliver successful graduates. In order to assess Quantity Surveyors’ perceptions of the role and capability of tertiary education in New Zealand, an online survey was carried out with the support of the New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NZIQS). Of the 75 practising QSs who participated in the survey, the majority believed that the role of tertiary education is to focus on the basic technical abilities needed within the Quantity Surveying profession, leaving more advanced skills and knowledge to be developed once graduates are employed in the industry. Overall, respondents considered that existing tertiary courses adequately provide the education needed to start in the Quantity Surveying profession, although a common recurring theme was the need for greater collaboration between tertiary providers, industry and professional institutions to determine what is taught. Views offered regarding the importance of various skills and types of knowledge required were often contradictory, indicating that consensus on the role and function of tertiary education for the profession is not so easily obtained.

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  • Mapping roles in an altered landscape: The impact of BIM on designer-constructor relationships

    Davies, Kathryn; McMeel, Dermott; Wilkinson, Suzanne (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The increasing uptake of Building Information Modelling (BIM) is contributing to pressures and changes in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, which require adjustments and adaptation in the roles of almost all participants. One of the most commonly cited changes is the increase in collaboration and a shift to more integrated project teams. Thus the traditional role descriptions for the various professionals involved in a construction project become less distinctly separate, or new roles emerge. Definitions of skill sets and competencies that have been charted over many years are now being unpicked and reshaped as the needs of industry change. Different organisations, projects and partnerships take different approaches to the adoption of BIM, and consequently there are several different strains of work under this broad umbrella. This has resulted in a wide variety of interpretations of what constitutes successful or appropriate BIM use, and it is valuable to distinguish between the varied concerns. The impact of BIM and its associated process changes vary considerably depending on how it is interpreted and whether a global or an incremental approach is taken within the project or organisation. There is also significant potential for unexpected effects on the nature of the product (the design and construction of the built environment) or on the organisations and industry structure, beyond intended productivity improvements and quality enhancements. Based on a review of existing literature, this paper provides a typology for identifying current BIM adoption trends in industry, with an analysis of available empirical data to help identify the effects of BIM on roles within organisational and project contexts. The review centres most significantly on the contours of the designer-constructor relationship. It explores the impacts of the varying degrees of collaboration identified and the extent to which a BIM-mediated process reshapes skill sets and competencies.

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  • What motivates and demotivates construction company employees in Christchurch's post earthquake residential sector -a case study.

    Holmes, Bartt; Kestle, Linda (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A large NZ construction company was engaged to effect repairs on 100,000 homes in Christchurch from 2011 till 2015, following the 2010 and 2011 major earthquakes. Three years on, thousands of homeowners are still waiting for remedial work to be approved and implemented, and work opportunities in Christchurch have escalated. Large numbers of staff from the North Island based company relocated to continue to work for them in purpose-created hubs in Christchurch. This research sought to establish whether motivational factors differed across differing occupational groups in these hubs.

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  • Last Planner System – a step towards improving the productivity of New Zealand Construction

    Fuemana, Jonson; Puolitaival, Taija; Davies, Kathryn (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Productivity of New Zealand’s construction sector is declining compared with other countries and with most other sectors of the New Zealand economy. In response, the New Zealand government has set a target to lift construction sector productivity by 20% from the year 2010 to 2020. Development and use of new tools is seen as part of the solution, as is the adoption of international construction best practice. Lean Construction approaches are among those considered international best practice; construction industry experience with Lean is widely used and reported around the world in North America, Europe and Asia, but adoption has been very limited in New Zealand to date. The basis of the research was the low level of implementation of Lean methods, more accurately Last Planner System (LPS) in New Zealand commercial construction. The focus of the research was on the perceived benefits and challenges of LPS and the factors which hinder its implementation in New Zealand companies. While the findings indicate that benefits and challenges are generally perceived to be the same as those reported internationally, procurement methods have been raised as a key issue when considering the obstacles to implementation in the New Zealand context.

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  • A naturalistic inquiry of the relationship between learner beliefs and learner autonomy

    Zhong, Qunyan (Maggie) (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Learner autonomy has received increasing attention in the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA). Many educators believe that the ultimate goal of teaching is to help students become life-long, independent learners. Holec, who was one of the first to explore the concept of learner autonomy, defines autonomy as ‘the ability to take charge of one’s own learning’ (1981: 3). Over the last few decades, in the field of SLA, considerable effort has been expended in identifying environmental and individual factors affecting learner autonomy and conditions for fostering it (Benson 2007). However, a review of the literature on learner autonomy indicates that studies examining the effects of learner beliefs on learner autonomy are less frequent. It can be argued that it is essential to discover and identify learners’ beliefs when promoting autonomous learning. This is simply because human beings are designers of their own actions (Argyris and Schön 1974). Behind all actions there are underpinning beliefs; hence, learners’ autonomous learning is also governed by their beliefs.

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  • Development of a Multi-Purpose Breakwater Reef at Maqai Eco Surf Resort, Qamea Island, Fiji. Coasts & Ports

    Mead, Shaw; Phillips, David; Prime, Arama (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A breakwater/reef and channel/lagoon development has been designed to alleviate the current ecological damage of the coral reef flat and lagoon, and the health and safety hazards involved with access to the Maqai Eco Surf Resort. At present, foot and boat traffic impact on large areas of the reef during access at both low and high tides, while wave penetration at high tide causes vigorous boat movement and makes it difficult and dangerous to board and leave boats (there is no road access to the resort). In addition, at low tide access is restricted with a landing bay located almost a kilometre from the resort, which is cause for concern should an emergency occur. Thus, the breakwater/reef development is aimed at focussing foot and boat traffic to protect the surrounding reef, providing a safe all-tide boat access, with the addition of providing a learner’s surfing break at higher tidal levels. To date, Stage 1 of this three stage project has been completed. This paper describes the design/impact aspects of the project and results of Stage 1 of the development.

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  • Learner Beliefs and Learner Autonomy : A Case Study of Two Chinese Migrant Learners in New Zealand.

    Zhong, Qunyan (Maggie) (2011)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Learner autonomy has received increasing attention in SLA. However, a literature review indicates that empirical studies focusing on the impact of individual learner factors on learner autonomy are scarce. This study employed a naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) to investigate the relationship between two Chinese migrant learners’ beliefs about language learning and their levels of learner autonomy. A number of instruments (interviews, classroom observations, stimulated recall interviews and learning logs) were used to collect triangulated data over an 18-week period. Following standard procedures of qualitative data analysis, the study identified four categories of learners’ beliefs. The results reveal that the learners varied in the beliefs they held about language learning. Some of them were more conducive to learner autonomy while others were at odds. Their beliefs influenced their levels of autonomy. The study suggests that educators should take into account learners’ beliefs when promoting autonomous learning. The paper concludes with some practical instructional recommendations.

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  • Revealing the cryptic

    Bish, A.; Davies, Renee; Haines, L. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Invertebrate numbers worldwide are declining, predominantly due a lack of knowledge and detrimental activities on habitat such as urban expansion. "Invertebrates ore essential to our natural environment and to humans,"(Department of Conservation, 2006), due to the numerous ecosystem services they provide. Without invertebrates, human life as we currently know it would be very different This research explores how urban landscapes can be designed to provide for invertebrates and uses the highly urbanised Auckland City Centre as a case study. CBD spatial characteristics were identified using GIS,Auckland Council documents and on site observation. The CBD is a fragmented landscape of patches, which together form an ecological network. At the landscape scale this network is reinforced by designed interventions, and consists of a series of nodes that ore used by invertebrates. Invertebrate information was collected, analysed and categorised into functional groups, which enabled a set of criteria to be established for local design interventions, for both species specific and general habitat types.These interventions are based at each node within the network.Although some interventions will be species specific, it is expected that a range of invertebrate species will take advantage of these interventions, thus increasing biodiversity.An adaptive management strategy will be used to monitor and adjust habitat requirements accordingly. Invertebrates are cryptic and these small to medium interventions throughout the city are aimed at revealing the presence of invertebrates. Interpretive devices such as QR Codes and projector screens allow the public to better perceive invertebrates as part of their daily environment and to follow mapped habitat routes. A set of guidelines allows habitat interventions to be retrofitted within most urban sites.Throughout the city these interventions facilitate positive interactions between people and invertebrates through education, increased invertebrate visibility and biodiversity.

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  • A longitudinal comparison of aspects of diversity in two common wealth countries.

    Nel, Pieter; Fourie, Leon; Du Plessis, Andries (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Commonwealth countries have a common colonial background with accompanying problems and opportunities. Recognising and addressing diversity and equal employment opportunity are common issues in these countries. The focus is on four empirical research projects over 10 years in New Zealand and South Africa between 2000 and 2010 with forecasts up to 2020 enabling comparative analyses in a longitudinal manner. The overall results show a heightened awareness of particularly diversity and equal employment opportunity which highlights an increased rolefor HR practitioners in both countries. Opportunities are created for business leaders to take note of the commonality between New Zealand and South Africa which could lead to enhanced inter-country business activities and improved returns

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  • The use of the balanced scorecard to enhance performance culture in a New Zealand information technology organisation.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Tachiwona, G.; Sukumaran, Sukesh; Marriott, Jeff (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper shed light on how managers can use the balanced scorecard to transform low performing information technology service teams into highly productive and profitable units that meet customer service expectations. Two research questions are answered: what were the major drivers of low business performance, and how were they addressed? How did managers get the necessary buy-in from employees for the balanced scorecard to be successful? An exploratory research was executed covering three years of the balanced scorecard implementation in a New Zealand Information Technology Service Organisation interviewing managers, employees and a customer director. Some findings are: a lack of process and management leadership; communication was poor; relationships between engineers, managers, Medicare and NZIS were also tensed and distrustful. Some recommendations are made and the conclusions form the last part of the paper.

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  • The roles, goals and activities of employers and HR practitioners in New Zealand for organisations to be successful and competitive: empirical evidence from a longitudinal study

    Du Plessis, Andries; Fourie, Leon; Nel, Pieter (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This research considers the role, activities and contribution of HR and managers in six closely related themes that should be addressed to maintain high workplace productivity in a complex business environment in which there are many competing interests. Previously a reward approach was simple with two main streams pay and benefits. In New Zealand HR practitioners have been exposed to global competition creating the need for their roles, goals and activities to be recognised in adding value in organisations to be successful. The outcomes of this research shed light on when is an employer an employer of choice, employee empowerment, employee engagement, rewards based on individual and the whole organisation's performance including the remuneration component that is a reward system classifiable into monetary- and in-kind payments. Recommendations and the conclusion form the last two sections.

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  • HR practitioners’ contribution to business excellence: results spanning a quarter of a century in New Zealand

    Nel, Pieter; Fourie, Leon (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Competent managers and human resource (HR) practitioners play a pivotal role in the success of any business. This includes a variety of business functions that ought to he identified and managed to add value to the bottom-line and harness opportunities .Empirical research was conducted in New Zealand in 2010 to repeat two similar 2000 surveys and an earlier survey conducted in 1994. The longitudinal results up to 2020 identified important areas of the business environment as perceived by HR practitioners. These are awareness of the importance of the effect of change, international competition, and customer satisfaction. It is recommended that HR managers must become dedicated change agents to continue to support management optimally, as this perception was revealed by the survey results over the 25 year period.

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  • Closing the generation gap : Using co-design with children to encourage sustainable practice in the built environment.

    Wake, Sue (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper explores the potential for children to learn about sustainability and feel empowered by involvement in the design and construction of the built environment they inhabit, especially schools. This paper concludes that the educational and social value of involving children in a sustainability-focused design process far outweighs the perceived costs of increased time and therefore budget. If current practitioners are to pass on a legacy of building sustainably they need to begin sharing their knowledge now with tomorrow's generation. It is also suggested that method details and types of participation are less important than 'giving it a go', as long as it is clear to the children what their involvement is. In reciprocation for designers, during the process their own practice may be broadened and enriched.

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  • Suggestion system as an HRM tool to be successful in organisations : some empirical evidence in New Zealand.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Marx, A. E.; Botha, Christoff J. (2014)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Employees have ideas and will not submit it if the environment is not supportive. A suggestion system is as a formal procedure encouraging employees to think creatively about their work and environment to produce ideas. HRM should be creative and innovative and use any possible tool that contributes to their survival or success. The suggestion system is an undervalued tool. The success of it depends on management's commitment and involvement, proper policies, procedures and rules, an affective administration and processing process, objective evaluation of ideas and a fair recognition or rewarding system. Research executed through a qualitative approach in organisations in New Zealand resulted in a 100% response rate. Training and involving employees in the value of the system helps to be effective in using suggestion systems. Software should be used to administer and to manage the process effectively and efficiently. A flow chart was developed by the authors to assist with the use of the system.

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  • Re-shaping the process of design & making: shifting the relationship between designer and client in the context of digital knitwear design and production systems

    Farren, Anne; Yang, Sooyung

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    New technologies have created a gap in designer knowledge and understanding of the design capabilities and production potential of new CAD software driven equipment. Significantly, within some sectors of the fashion industry, there is an assumption that CAD software run production technologies can eliminate the need for a designer, with production-based technologies “driven” by a technician. Our work with the garment industry supports the emergence of an assumption amongst production machinery manufacturers that CAD software systems can eliminate design input and associated costs (Mohammed, May, & Alavi, 2008; Eckert, Cross, & Johnson, 2000; Eckert, Kelly, & Stacey, 1999). CAD driven production technologies such as the Shima Seiki WholeGarment® knitting system have “predefined garment templates” (preregistered garment shapes in Shima Seiki’s terms) embedded in the software. The manufacturer of this machine claims that these preregistered garment shapes can minimize the creativity gap between the designer and technician. However it is our experience that the system is too complex for cost effective implementation of design innovation. Recent developments in CAD driven knitwear production systems have resulted in changes to the conventional relationships between the client, the designer and the technician. In this context, we have identified a new role, the “designer-interpreter”. Designer-interpreter denotes a professional knitwear designer with additional training in managing computerized seamless knitting machines. Research carried out at Curtin University has identified this as a creative role that is required to optimize design and production using computerized flat V-bed seamless knitting systems. Within current applications of computerised V-bed seamless knitting systems, the textile and garment design processes are fully integrated and cannot be effectivelymanipulated in isolation. There is a current assumption that a knitwear technician can be a design-interpreter. However the designer-interpreter is required to facilitate the creative integration of textile and garment design. This is achieved through the application of their specialist knowledge of knit design, CAD driven software and machine operation. The designer-interpreter can work with either another designer or the end user to develop fully customized garments. With the creative support of the designer-interpreter, a consumer without any design background effectively becomes a “designer”. This system repositions the relationship between designer, manufacturer and consumer. This paper presents research carried out by the Fashion Design & Research HUB at Curtin University into the creative potential of the design process using computerized flat V-bed seamless knitting technology for the client with little or no garment design experience. It reflects on observations made during workshops, of the changing nature in the relationships between designer-interpreter, client, design process and technology.

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  • The loop model : modeling consumer interactivity in campaigns coupling simultaneous media

    Davis, Robert (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Based on the responses of 506 consumers, this research models the consumers’ experience of interactivity when interacting with campaigns simultaneously coupling the ubiquitous mobile channel with other channels of response. In Study 1 (RQ1) support was found using structural equation modeling (SEM) for the conceptual model that related the consumers’ experience of interactivity with channel purchase and usage. In Study 2 (RQ2) the significance was assessed of alternative simultaneous channel couplings with purchase frequency. Support was found for up to 5 channel configurations but only when combined with the Internet, mobile and/or television media. The research implications are discussed.

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