84 results for Conference poster, 2000

  • Te Punga and the Net Generation

    Wilkinson, Elizabeth; Sutton, Megan (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our existing Voyager catalogue tutorial was text-heavy and decontextualised— detached from student experience, youth culture and the research process. The aim was to create a student-centred tutorial, applying sound learning principles, providing relevant contexts for first year students and using Net Gen modes to convey the information.

    View record details
  • Approximated Ground Truth for Stereo and Motion Analysis on Real-World Sequences (Poster)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We approximate ground truth for real-world stereo sequences and demonstrate its use for the performance analysis of a few selected stereo matching and optic flow techniques. Basically we assume zero roll and constant tilt of an ego-vehicle (for about 10 seconds) driving on a planar road.

    View record details
  • Inclusion of a Second-Order Prior into Semi-Global Matching. (2009)

    Hermann, Simon; Klette, Reinhard; Destenfanis, Eduardo (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We consider different parameter settings for SGM, suggest to include a second order prior into the smoothness term of the energy function, and propose and test a new cost function. Some preprocessing (edge images) proves to be of value for improving SGM stereo results on real-world data.

    View record details
  • Recovery Rate of Clustering Algorithms. (2009)

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We provide a simple and general way for defining the recovery rate of clustering algorithms using a given family of old clusters for evaluating the performance when calculating a family of new clusters. The recovery rate may be calculated by using an approximate and efficient algorithm.

    View record details
  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

    View record details
  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

    View record details
  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: • Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. • Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. • Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. • Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of “born digital” material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy • Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

    View record details
  • CellML: Cellml.org, Tools and Community

    Lawson J.; Lloyd C.; Noble P.; Hunter P.; Nielsen P. (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at ICSB2007 The purpose of CellML is to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models of as wide a range of scale and subject as posssible. For example, biochemical signalling and metabolic systems can be embedded in electrophysiological models of excitable cells in CellML. The CellML language is an open standard based on the XML markup language and is being developed by the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland and affiliated research groups [1]. The majority of computational biology publications aim to discuss their model but often fail to provide a comprehensive set of instructions for recreating the model, or include errors preventing reproduction of published model outputs. Publishing a paper with a link to a CellML model facilitates the wide distribution and recreation of that model, and additionally forces the modeller to carefully consider matters such as unit consistency. The CellML specification and application programming interfaces (API) are driven by a core team, but a growing international community is involved in work related to CellML. A community website (www.cellml.org) has been set up as a focal point for the community and also functions as a model repository. A number of groups are developing software tools for CellML and using the language for research in computational biology. A repository of almost 300 unique CellML models is available at www.cellml.org/models: these are computational models from peer-reviewed publications that have been coded into CellML. These models are undergoing an active curation process based on the MIRIAM standard, proposed by the international biological modelling community [2]. This process includes provision of comprehensive documentation, annotation with citation and model author metadata, maintenance of file modification histories, and correspondence with model authors to ensure that models define all required initial conditions and parameters. The CellML community strongly supports collaboration with other groups to continue to set standards for curation and distribution of biological models. A number of free / open source software tools for developing and simulating CellML models are available, including Physiome CellML Environment (PCEnv) and Cellular Open Resource (COR). Other modelling environments such as JSim and Virtual Cell also support the CellML format. Information on further tools such as validators, debuggers and simulation specific packages can be found at www.cellml.org/tools. In the near future, models in the cellml.org model repository will be completely annotated with ontologies such as BioPaX and references to databases such as UniProt. Models will be broken down into the components from which they are comprised, and these components will themselves be curated, providing a toolbox of standardised computational parts from which new models can be created, in an in silico analogy to the MIT Registry of Standard Biological parts (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/index.php/Main_Page). An API has recently been developed for software tools to allow interaction between CellML and SVG diagrams of models, such as biochemical pathway schematics, and work is also underway to standardise graphical representations of CellML models. For more information, please join the CellML community mailing list at http://www.cellml.org/mailman/listinfo/cellml-discussion. 1.) Cuellar, A.A., Lloyd, C. M., Nielsen, P. F., Bullivant, D. P., Nickerson, D. P., Hunter, P. J. "An Overview of CellML 1.1, a Biological Model Description Language" Simulation, 2003, 79, No. 12, 740-747 2.) Le Novere, N., Finney, A., Hucka, M., Bhalla, U.S., Campagne, F., Collado-Vides, J., Crampin, E.J., Halstead, M., Klipp, E., Mendes, P., Nielsen, P., Sauro, H., Shapiro, B., Snoep, J.L., Spence, H.D., Wanner, B.L. "Minium information requested in the annotation of biochemical models (MIRIAM)" Nature Biotechnology, 2005, 23 1509-1515

    View record details
  • The use of whole community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within stream biofilms

    Lear, Gavin; Boothroyd, IK; Lewis, Gillian (2009-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

    View record details
  • Human Adenovirus ecology in environmental waters in New Zealand

    Dong, Yimin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A major New Zealand study of pathogen occurrence in surface freshwaters identified occurrence of human adenovirus in 30% of sites and samples by qualitative PCR based methods. The source or nature of these viruses was not clear from the study and raises important questions in both viral ecology and human health protection. The aim of this study was to begin to unravel these questions by (i) development of specific quantitative analysis methods for adenoviruses in water and (ii) to target identifiable groups of adenovirus associated with human respiratory or gastrointestinal infections. These quantitative group specific real time PCR methods were tested in drinking water, recreational water, river water and wastewater. Adenovirus was detected in all primary wastewater samples tested (n=10) at high genome copy number (1.87 x104 to 4.6 x106 per litre) and in 33% (n=15) of the river water and 11% (n=27) of the treated drinking water samples. In addition, adenovirus was detected in 5 of the 6 estuarine recreational water samples (17 to 1190 virus genome copies per litre). DNA sequence analysis suggested that human adenovirus group C (respiratory infection associated) were most commonly associated with river, recreational and drinking water. Group F adenovirus (gastroenteritis associated viruses) were found to dominate in most wastewater (5 - 100 % total adenovirus) but were not detected in surface waters. This study suggests that the ecology of specific groups or types of adenovirus is sufficiently different, external to the host, to have important implications for human health risk assessment.

    View record details
  • Effect of light regimes on the utilisation of an exogenous carbon source by freshwater biofilm communities

    Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2007-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Biofilms are a major source of ‘in stream’ primary production, exhibiting high population density, and being an important source of carbon for microbial heterotrophs. Changing patterns of land-use within freshwater catchment areas may greatly impact on stream biofilm microbial community structure, which in turn may influence the speed and extent with which full ecosystem recovery may occur. This study reports how freshwater biofilm communities respond to additions of acetate, used as a proxy for organic matter, the primary source of carbon within shaded forests and headwater streams. The use of [ 13C] acetate and subsequent isolation of 13C-labelled nucleic acids from the metabolically active fraction of the bacterial community enabled substrate assimilating organisms to be identified. In addition, biofilms were exposed to varied levels of incident light to assess the relative contribution of phototrophic and heterotrophic nutrition.

    View record details
  • Ecosystem responses to multiple-stressor gradients: Nutrient and sediment addition to experimental stream channels

    Wagenhoff, A; Matthaei, CD; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian; Townsend, CR (2009-05-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Agricultural land use can strongly affect stream ecosystems by increasing levels of nutrients and fine sediment cover on the streambed. Knowledge of patterns in ecological responses along gradients of these two stressors will help define thresholds of harm. Leaf breakdown rates, algal and bacterial communities are directly and/or indirectly influenced by nutrient supply and fine sediment cover. To investigate the effects of stressor gradients and their interactions on these biological response parameters, we designed a full-factorial experiment in circular stream-side channels with eight levels each of nutrients (36 to 6900 μg·l-1 DIN, 1.4 to 450 μg·l-1 DRP) and fine sediment (0 to 100 % cover). Algal biomass, bacterial diversity and leaf pack decomposition were determined after three weeks of exposure to both stressors. Algal biomass was significantly higher in channels with lower levels of fine sediment. Bacterial diversity generally increased with increasing nutrient concentrations up to an intermediate nutrient level but then decreased again with the exception of reaching the highest diversity overall at the top nutrient level. Thus, increased levels of nutrients and fine sediment caused major changes to the algal and bacterial communities. In turn, these changes affect other food-web components as well as ecosystem functioning, including decomposition.

    View record details
  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

    View record details
  • Effects of Storm water metal contaminats on microbial communities in stream biofilm revealed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA)

    Ancion, Pierre; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stormwater metal contaminants are known to be a threat to our freshwater environments but little is known about their effects on stream micro-organisms. This project investigates accumulation and release of the most common stormwater metal contaminants (zinc, copper and lead) in stream biofilms and their effects on bacterial populations.

    View record details
  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

    View record details
  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

    View record details
  • The CellML Model Repository as a Resource for Cardiac Modelling

    Lawson, J.R.; Nobile, P.J.; Lloyd, C.M.; Neilsen, P.F.; Hunter, P.J. (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at Waiheke 2008 Multiscale Modelling of the Heart Workshop. The CellML repository now contains a number of well curated CellML models of cardiac biology and physiology at the cellular and subcellular level. Recently this resource has been growing rapidly in both quality and quantity and includes models of cardiac electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament mechanics, signalling systems and combinations thereof. Herein we describe the CellML model repository, its range of models, the tools used to develop and test these models and the processes and aims of curating them. The relevance of this resource to multi-scale modelling of the heart in the present and the future is then discussed.

    View record details
  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

    View record details
  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

    View record details