192 results for Conference poster, 2010

  • Effects of complex milk lipid components on neurodevelopment in vitro

    Lim, JH; Hodgkinson, S; Dragunow, M; Norris, C; Vickers, M (2010-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling.

    Mitchell, Jennine; Tawahi MH (2010-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling. Jennine Mitchell and Dr Merryn Tawhai Auckland Bioengineering institute The multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) is a global test of lung function that produces two indices Sacin and Scond that are reflective of ventilation heterogeneity arising at the level of acinus and between more spatially disparate regions of the lung respectively. An important application of the MBNW is in the study of asthma. Ventilation defects have been noted to occur in imaging studies of asthma. These regional ventilation defects have not previously been considered in relation to the MBNW indices. Scond is purported to be related to the state of conducting airways however no modelling studies exist which directly link the airway state to Scond. In this work regional ventilation defects have been simulated in an anatomically based human lung model and theoretically linked to the MBNW indices Sacin and Scond. Ventilation is simualted to the level of the acinus in a model in which acinar ventilation is considered independent of ventialtion in other acini. As previously indicated in modelling studies a high degree of constriction is required to produce a ventilation defect. The relationship between the degree of constriction in airways leading to the defect and the Scond index is however highly non-linear and shows a sharp decrease at very high levels of constriction. Ventilation defects potentially cause non-communication of gas trapped in the ventilation defects with the mouth. This may alter the calculation of FRC if nitrogen dilution is used to calculate FRC. As the indices are dependent on the phase III slope for each breath being normalised by FRC this alters MBNW results. The index Scond is not be able to be explained simply in terms of increased time constants due to increased resistance in the main conducting airway tree. The model indicates that the Scond index is more complex than current MBNW theory indicates and cannot be simply explained in terms of a longer time constant due to constriction in the conducting airway tree resulting in increased late emptying of poorly ventilated regions.

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  • Doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coated surfaces to reduce fouling from milk

    Patel, Jaiminkumar; Bansal, B; Jones, MI; Hyland, M (2010-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the dairy industry, fouling of processing surfaces is a common and unresolved problem. Surface modification, for example through the application of a surface coating, can alter the surface properties of a material, and may be a potential way to reduce fouling. Typical dairy plant stainless steel surfaces were modified by the deposition of doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films with varying concentration of doped elements. These modified surfaces were studied for their fouling behavior with milk at both laboratory and pilot scale. None of the doped DLC modified surfaces investigated in the study presented benefits in fouling reduction as compared to unmodified surface.

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  • Retrospective host specificity testing of Cotesia urabae to assess the risk posed to the New Zealand nolid moth Celama parvitis

    Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Withers, TM; Holwell, GI (2014-08-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Additional retrospective testing of the gum leaf skeletoniser (Uraba lugens) biological control agent Cotesia urabae was conducted against the endemic moth Celama parvitis. Although this native was included in host specificity testing before EPA approved the parasitoid's release, this work aimed to increase the sample size to better assess the potential risk posed. The effect that different periods of host deprivation and prior oviposition experience had on the parasitoid's readiness to attack, was examined in a sequence of no-choice tests. No parasitoids emerged from the 52% of larvae that survived to pupation, thus, confirming C. parvitis as a non-host. Dissections of larvae that died during laboratory rearing revealed that 63% had contained a parasitoid, but no C. urabae parasitoid larvae developed beyond the second instar. Significant differences were found in the attack times according to the parasitoid's deprivation levels (age), and it was also observed that the duration until first attack significantly decreased after each non-target presentation.

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  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • Measuring the electrical impedance of mouse brain cortex

    Wilson, MT; Elbohouty, M; Lin, Oliver; Voss, LJ; Jones, K; Steyn-Ross, DA (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report on an experimental method to measure conductivity of cortical tissue. We use a pair of 5mm diameter Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich device that can be brought to a distance of 400 microns apart. The apparatus is brought to uniform temperature before use. Electrical impedance of a sample is measured across the frequency range 20 Hz-2.0 MHz with an Agilent 4980A four-point impedance monitor in a shielded room. The equipment has been used to measure the conductivity of mature mouse brain cortex in vitro. Slices 400 microns in thickness are prepared on a vibratome. Slices are bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to keep them alive. Slices are removed from the ACSF and sections of cortical tissue approximately 2 mm times 2 mm are cut with a razor blade. The sections are photographed through a calibrated microscope to allow identification of their cross-sectional areas. Excess ACSF is removed from the sample and the sections places between the electrodes. The impedance is measured across the frequency range and electrical conductivity calculated. Results show two regions of dispersion. A low frequency region is evident below approximately 10 kHz, and a high frequency dispersion above this. Results at the higher frequencies show a good fit to the Cole-Cole model of impedance of biological tissue; this model consists of resistive and non-linear capacitive elements. Physically, these elements are likely to arise due to membrane polarization and migration of ions both intra- and extra-cellularly.

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  • Novel release method proves successful: The gum leaf skeletoniser parasitoid Cotesia urabae establishes in two new locations

    Gresham, BA; Withers, TM; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Berndt, LA (2014-08-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Australian braconid wasp Cotesia urabae was first released in New Zealand in 2011, as a biological control agent for the gum leaf skeletoniser Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae). The larvae of this moth predominantly attack Eucalyptus spp. (Class: Symphyomyrtus) and, since its predicted future geographic range is extensive, there is concern it could become a serious pest of eucalypt plantations in New Zealand. Initial releases of C. urabae using adult parasitoids were made in Auckland at three separate sites between January and June 2011. Cotesia urabae established at each site and preliminary monitoring has revealed that the wasps have naturally dispersed to six other sites, ranging up to 6 km from an initial release site. In January 2012, C. urabae were released in Whangarei and Tauranga, trialling a novel method using parasitoid-attacked host larvae, rather than adult parasitoids. This method proved to be successful, with establishment now confirmed in both of these locations, and also provided greater flexibility. The two latest releases were made using the same method in Nelson (October 2013) and Napier (February 2014), but it is not yet known if the parasitoid has successfully established in these locations.

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  • Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in .

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Chan, YK; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Beban, G; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Poppitt, SD; Cooper, GJS (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    3. Anne-Thea McGill¹,Yih-Kai Chan, Lindsay Plank, Briar McLeod, Grant Beban, Sofie Falk, Katy Wiessing, Sally D Poppitt, Garth JS Cooper. Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in women. T2:PO.33. Obesity Reviews, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages iii-iv, 1-502, July 2010 Special Issue Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Nonlinear dynamics of an electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions

    Doud, AB; Breen, Barbara; Grimm, JR; Tanasse, AH; Tanasse, SJ; Lindner, JF; Maxted, K (2011-03-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One-way or unidirectional coupling is a striking example of how topological considerations -- the parity of an array of multistable elements combined with periodic boundary conditions -- can qualitatively influence dynamics. Here we introduce a simple electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions and experimentally compare it to an improved mechanical model and an ideal mathematical model. In two dimensions, computation and experiment reveal richer one-way coupling phenomenology: in media where two-way coupling would dissipate all excitations, one-way coupling enables soliton-like waves to propagate in different directions with different speeds.

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  • Probing Student Approaches and Engagement in Learning Chemistry at University.

    Salter, David; Simpson, MC; Hamilton, R (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This project aims to identify students’ learning approaches, engagement, attitudes and success in chemistry classes that are service-taught as part of a specified health sciences programme and in chemistry classes that are taught as part of a chemistry major programme. It seeks to determine whether any differences exist in the learning approaches, motivational orientation and engagement, and compare the success of a cohort of students who are required to enrol in a compulsory chemistry course as part of a health sciences degree with that of a cohort of students who choose to enrol in a chemistry course with the possible intention of majoring in chemistry. It is intended that both cognitive and motivational individual difference variables are identified and relationships between students’ goal orientation and university academic success evaluated.

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  • The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits

    Aspinall, Cathleen; Baker, H; Vallant, S; Spence, D (2010-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits Intent. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a collaborative project to implement an integrated team model of learning in practice with the clinical placement provider for second year Bachelor of Nursing students from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology. Description. Our clinical partner put forward a proposal to change the model of working with undergraduate student nurses in the clinical environment .The aim was to improve the student’s integration into nursing teams and also strengthen their model of team nursing. The World Health Organisation (WHO 2009) identified that the role individuals play within a team influences team effectiveness and therefore impacts on the quality of patient safety. From a University perspective this involved changing the role of the academic lecturer from working alongside the student to supporting the registered nurses. In their role as mentors, the nurses would assist with the integration of theory into practice and teach clinical skills at the bedside. A perceived benefit would be the emersion of second year student nurses into the ward team. The student nurse integrated team model was devised based on a mentorship concept and piloted in the medical and surgical areas of the public hospital. This study evaluated the model from both the University and the ADHB perspective using a mixed methodology.The University of Auckland surveyed students, university lecturers, charge nurses, staff nurse mentors and clinical nurse educators.The Auckland University of Technology held focus groups with the same participants. It was anticipated that this method would provide hard data for evaluation and qualitative information to explore the experience. The introduction of a new way of working in reality meant a change of role for university and clinical staff. Furthermore, the success of the project as with any change initiative, was dependent on a number of stakeholders. Evaluation Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the evaluation of this new way of working, the process and results will be shared at the conference. Bibliography includes but not limited to the following: Flin, R. Winter, J. Sarac, and C. & Raduma, M. (2009) .Human factors in patient safety: Review of tools and topics. Geneva: World Health Organization.

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  • High throughput methods for the investigation of the human microbiome

    Lau, Kelvin; Berg, A; Ketley, J; Barer, M (2011-03-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Microorganisms can colonise many sites within the human host, including the skin, gastrointestinal tracts, oronasopharyngeal cavity and urogenital tract. Comprehensive studies of the human microbiome often need to encompass a large number of samples as a consequence of the variety of distinct sites that are colonised, and the significant variation in microbiota that can exist between individuals. For large sample sets, the cost of sequencing and the bioinformatics resources required to process sequence data can be prohibitive, and become limiting factors for the depth of the investigation. ....

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  • Characterisation of a transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease

    Reid, Susanne; Handley, R; Patassini, S; Rudiger, S; Keynes, P; McLaughlan, C; Waldvogel, H; Jacobsen, J; MacDonald, M; Gusella, J; Morton, J; Bawden, S; Faull, R; Snell, R (2011-09-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease has been developed to enable the examination of the earliest disease changes in a large mammal. Ovis aries were selected because their basal ganglia and cortex is similar to analogous regions of the human brain. Importantly, they live for more than a decade, allowing for the study of the chronic effects of a fulllength HTT expressing transgene. Microinjection of a fulllength human HD cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promoter, resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy-number of the transgene.

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