31 results for Conference poster, 2008

  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

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  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Human Adenovirus ecology in environmental waters in New Zealand

    Dong, Yimin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A major New Zealand study of pathogen occurrence in surface freshwaters identified occurrence of human adenovirus in 30% of sites and samples by qualitative PCR based methods. The source or nature of these viruses was not clear from the study and raises important questions in both viral ecology and human health protection. The aim of this study was to begin to unravel these questions by (i) development of specific quantitative analysis methods for adenoviruses in water and (ii) to target identifiable groups of adenovirus associated with human respiratory or gastrointestinal infections. These quantitative group specific real time PCR methods were tested in drinking water, recreational water, river water and wastewater. Adenovirus was detected in all primary wastewater samples tested (n=10) at high genome copy number (1.87 x104 to 4.6 x106 per litre) and in 33% (n=15) of the river water and 11% (n=27) of the treated drinking water samples. In addition, adenovirus was detected in 5 of the 6 estuarine recreational water samples (17 to 1190 virus genome copies per litre). DNA sequence analysis suggested that human adenovirus group C (respiratory infection associated) were most commonly associated with river, recreational and drinking water. Group F adenovirus (gastroenteritis associated viruses) were found to dominate in most wastewater (5 - 100 % total adenovirus) but were not detected in surface waters. This study suggests that the ecology of specific groups or types of adenovirus is sufficiently different, external to the host, to have important implications for human health risk assessment.

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  • Effects of Storm water metal contaminats on microbial communities in stream biofilm revealed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA)

    Ancion, Pierre; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stormwater metal contaminants are known to be a threat to our freshwater environments but little is known about their effects on stream micro-organisms. This project investigates accumulation and release of the most common stormwater metal contaminants (zinc, copper and lead) in stream biofilms and their effects on bacterial populations.

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • The CellML Model Repository as a Resource for Cardiac Modelling

    Lawson, J.R.; Nobile, P.J.; Lloyd, C.M.; Neilsen, P.F.; Hunter, P.J. (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at Waiheke 2008 Multiscale Modelling of the Heart Workshop. The CellML repository now contains a number of well curated CellML models of cardiac biology and physiology at the cellular and subcellular level. Recently this resource has been growing rapidly in both quality and quantity and includes models of cardiac electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament mechanics, signalling systems and combinations thereof. Herein we describe the CellML model repository, its range of models, the tools used to develop and test these models and the processes and aims of curating them. The relevance of this resource to multi-scale modelling of the heart in the present and the future is then discussed.

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  • Is negative exercise reinforcement a feature of exercise dependence? : factor analysis and further validation of the Exercise Reinforcement Questionnaire

    Lambert, Michelle (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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  • Metabolomics as a novel approach to study mixed species biofilms of stream bacteria exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic responses

    Washington, Vidya; Villas-Boas, Silas; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Experimental objective / Purpose 1. To investigate the metabolic interactions of bacterial species using metabolic footprint profiling. 2. As proof of concept, microbes exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic associations were chosen for this study.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Baby, Baby: Pregnant Again After Postnatal Depression

    Cowie, Susan (2008-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Depression following birth has wide ranging impacts on the woman, her new baby and her family. Studies indicate that treatment has been effective in shortening the duration of depression but does not prevent the increased risk of experiencing depression following another birth. This study explores in detail women’s and practitioners understandings of first time mother’s experiences of and recovery from depression and then focus on how the women prepare for and make sense of the experience of second time pregnancy and motherhood. It is hoped to develop strategies to reduce recurrence and impact of depression in women with young children. Results are presented of interviews with 25 women who had previously experienced post natal depression. Interviews were conducted 3-6 months before birth, focusing firstly on how the women make sense of their transition to first time motherhood and coping with/recovery from depression and secondly, on their expectations of second time birth and motherhood. The second interview, completed 3 months after birth, focused on their experience of the pregnancy, birth, and life with another child. Qualitative methodologies were employed. Of particular interest were the things that women described as helpful and unhelpful, their understanding of the help/treatment (e.g. Home help, CBT, support group, Arapax) they had gained and how this influenced their decisions and coping second time round. Preliminary analyses, particularly of time one data (collection complete), are reported and issues related to the study design and implementation are discussed.

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  • Use of whole-community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within freshwater stream biofilms.

    Lear, Gavin; Smith, Joanna; Roberts, Kelly; Boothroyd, Ian; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

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  • Unusual Bacterially mediated manganese-based structures within biofilms from urban streams.

    Smith, Joanna; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The objectives of this study were to describe the occurrence and nature of unusual brown “doughnut”-shaped microbial structures present within the biofilms of several urban streams in Auckland, New Zealand, and the bacteria responsible for their formation. These structures, termed anelli, were observed with light and scanning electron microscopy to be shallow conical microcolonies consisting of a ring, enriched in manganese and iron, surrounding a central pore. Bacteria were observed to reside within the pores, although anelli seen within biofilms were frequently vacant structures. A manganese depositing, anellus-forming bacterium (JOSHI_001) was isolated on solid media, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed this bacterium to belong to the order Burkholderiales within the class β-proteobacteria, closely related to the manganese-depositing genus Leptothrix. The presence of anelli within biofilms was found to require Mn(II), however, elevated levels of this element within stream water did not necessarily result in growth of anelli. Anelli were only dominant structures within biofilms from those stream sites subjected to a high level of anthropogenic impact, suggesting that Mn(II) may not be the only factor influencing competitive capability. Investigation of additional streams within the Auckland region, influenced by a range of different types of anthropogenic impact is ongoing. Molecular analysis indicated that although anelli were structurally dominant, the β-proteobacteria comprised only a minor component of the bacterial community present within the biofilms. JOSHI_001 may have a significant impact on geochemical cycling and stream ecology within streams subjected to high levels of anthropogenic impact.

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  • Functional analysis of the novel melanoma master-regulators

    Wang, Li (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Melanoma is a devastating form of cancer that is especially common in New Zealand and that is incompletely understood. In this project, we are using clinical microarray information about the function of tens of thousands of genes in melanoma patients. We are combining this clinical microarray information with microarray analysis of melanoma cells in the laboratory. In this laboratory analysis we have knocked down the expression of 75 different genes using a method known as siRNA. This clinical and laboratory data is combined mathematically using a method known as gene network analysis. This allows us to identify novel "master-regulators" of melanoma, which are seen as “hubs” in melanoma gene networks. These hubs may drive the uncontrolled growth of melanoma cells, and are likely to be useful as prognostic markers or new drug targets. We have already identified several novel melanoma gene network hubs using this method. The sequences encoding these hubs are cloning into an expression vector, and the candidate hub genes are then screened through a functional screening platform. Since we are interested the clinically important genes, we screen to identify those genes that may play a role in proliferation, sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis, and survival. We will transfect all the candidate genes (alongside a negative vector only control and a positive control of Bcl-2) into 293T cells (human embryonic kidney cells containing the SV40large T antigen to promote episomal replication of transfected plasmids), and A375 cells (melanoma). We will screen for expressed gene function using assays for viable cell number (MTT), assays for cell cycle progression (flow cytometry), and apoptosis assays. In particular we will use the anti-neoplastic drug etoposide (VP16) to induce apoptosis in cells that have been transfected by these genes and controls, to assess gene product function in modifying the apoptosis induced by VP16. For clinically relevant network hub genes that appear to play a role in controlling proliferation, apoptosis and survival, we will home in further on their mechanism of action (the methods used will depend upon our hypotheses about the gene product's function). We hope some of those hubs may lead to novel diagnostic/prognostic assays and novel drug targets.

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  • An examination of the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum)

    Finger, JSH; Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM; Montgomery, JC (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Following Altman’s and Kirsche’s challenge to the dogma that no new neurons could be produced during adulthood in the 1960’s, adult neurogenesis was shown in most vertebrate lineages. From a phylogenetic point of view, adult neurogenesis is not an uncommon event, having been demonstrated in reptiles and birds, amphibians, bony fi shes and mammals. At present, however, adult neurogenesis has not been examined in cartilagineous fi shes, the stem line of vertebrates. Sharks are an ideal group in which to study the extent of adult neurogenesis for several reasons: (i) they exhibit continuous body growth throughout life; (ii) in the stingray the number of peripheral axons and neurons continues to increase into adult life; and (iii) in adult gray reef sharks the number of inner ear hair cells also continues to increase. We have begun to evaluate the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum). A specimen of C isabellum was injected i.p. with 230 mg/kg of BrdU, anaesthetised and perfused after 2 hrs. The brain was cryoprotected and cut at 40 μm, and processed following standard immunocytochemical techniques. BrdU was found in a small number of nuclei in close proximity to the ventricular surface, in a similar position than occasional cells labelled with an antibody aginst β-tubuline (III). Some BrdU labelled nuclei were also found throughout the brain that were not stained with our neuronal marker. These preliminary data suggest that adult neurogenesis occurs in sharks and that like in bony fi shes, but unlike birds and mammals, it may also occur in non-telencephalic areas. If widespread adult neurogenesis can be unequivocally demonstrated in sharks, it would indicate that it represents the primitive condition. This therefore raises the question of what modifi cations in brain evolution of modern vertebrate lineages led to the restriction of this ability to specifi c forebrain areas.

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