25 results for Conference poster, 2009

  • Approximated Ground Truth for Stereo and Motion Analysis on Real-World Sequences (Poster)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We approximate ground truth for real-world stereo sequences and demonstrate its use for the performance analysis of a few selected stereo matching and optic flow techniques. Basically we assume zero roll and constant tilt of an ego-vehicle (for about 10 seconds) driving on a planar road.

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  • Inclusion of a Second-Order Prior into Semi-Global Matching. (2009)

    Hermann, Simon; Klette, Reinhard; Destenfanis, Eduardo (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We consider different parameter settings for SGM, suggest to include a second order prior into the smoothness term of the energy function, and propose and test a new cost function. Some preprocessing (edge images) proves to be of value for improving SGM stereo results on real-world data.

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  • Recovery Rate of Clustering Algorithms. (2009)

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We provide a simple and general way for defining the recovery rate of clustering algorithms using a given family of old clusters for evaluating the performance when calculating a family of new clusters. The recovery rate may be calculated by using an approximate and efficient algorithm.

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  • The use of whole community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within stream biofilms

    Lear, Gavin; Boothroyd, IK; Lewis, Gillian (2009-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

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  • Ecosystem responses to multiple-stressor gradients: Nutrient and sediment addition to experimental stream channels

    Wagenhoff, A; Matthaei, CD; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian; Townsend, CR (2009-05-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Agricultural land use can strongly affect stream ecosystems by increasing levels of nutrients and fine sediment cover on the streambed. Knowledge of patterns in ecological responses along gradients of these two stressors will help define thresholds of harm. Leaf breakdown rates, algal and bacterial communities are directly and/or indirectly influenced by nutrient supply and fine sediment cover. To investigate the effects of stressor gradients and their interactions on these biological response parameters, we designed a full-factorial experiment in circular stream-side channels with eight levels each of nutrients (36 to 6900 μg·l-1 DIN, 1.4 to 450 μg·l-1 DRP) and fine sediment (0 to 100 % cover). Algal biomass, bacterial diversity and leaf pack decomposition were determined after three weeks of exposure to both stressors. Algal biomass was significantly higher in channels with lower levels of fine sediment. Bacterial diversity generally increased with increasing nutrient concentrations up to an intermediate nutrient level but then decreased again with the exception of reaching the highest diversity overall at the top nutrient level. Thus, increased levels of nutrients and fine sediment caused major changes to the algal and bacterial communities. In turn, these changes affect other food-web components as well as ecosystem functioning, including decomposition.

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  • Three-Dimensional Structural Characterization of Tissue Engineered and Native Ovine Pulmonary Valves

    Eckert, Chad; Gerneke, Dane; Le Grice, Ian; Gottlieb, David; Mayer, JE; Sacks, MS (2009-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    OBJECTIVES: Efforts in tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHV) have shown increasingly equivalent mechanical/structural properties compared to native valves, though a literature gap exists regarding detailed structural information. This work was performed to provide such data of implanted TEHV, the native pulmonary valve (PV), and pre-implant scaffold to better understand developing TEHV. METHODS: Dynamically-cultured in vivo samples (“pre-implant”) and ovine TEHV PV in vitro samples (“explant”) were produced based on previous techniques; ovine PVs were excised. Samples were stained with picrosirius red and resinmounted. Using extended-volume scanning laser confocal microscopy (EV-SLCM), 1.5 x 1.5 x 0.4 mm full-thickness samples were imaged at 1 pixel/μm in 1 μm Z-direction steps. Custom software was used to process and visualize samples. Collagen, cell nuclei, and scaffold volume fractions were quantified; scaffold fiber trajectory and length were tracked using custom software. RESULTS: In a scaffold representative volume (90 μm thick), 104 fibers were tracked with a mean fiber length of 137.94 μm 55.4 μm (Fig.1). A comparison between pre-implant and explant samples showed collagen volume fraction increasing from 76.6% to 85.9%, with nuclei and scaffold decreasing from 2.8% to 0.5% and from 5.9% to 0.8%, respectively. With the native collagen volume fraction measured at 70%, pre-implant and explant samples showed an increase in collagen. CONCLUSIONS: This work captured important differences between in vivo/in vitro TEHV constituents; it is the first known work to utilize EV-SLCM on TEHV. A comparison to the native valve showed structural differences that could impact longterm functionality and improve design.

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  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

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  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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  • Nano-structural organisation in ionic liquids

    Kathirgamanathan, Kalyani; Al-Hakkak, J; Edmonds, Neil; Easteal, Allan; Grigsby, WJ (2009-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A case study on frontline perspectives of organizational change: A practitioner-academic partnership to analyse the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, Klaus (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Learning styles and e-learning: Delivering knowledge and skills for health, human service and social work managers

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Implementation of Cooperative Learning in New Zealand Physical Education.

    Dyson, Benedict; Ovens, Alan; Smith, Wayne (2009-09-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cells isolated from adult human brain. Are they fibroblasts, neural stem cells or both?

    Park, In; Gibbons, Hannah; Mee, EW; Teoh, HH; Faull, Richard; Dragunow, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult human brain capable of migrating and differentiating in response to external stimuli has re-defined the field of neuroscience. In order to study and characterize these NPCs, research groups have attempted to culture them in vitro with varying success. Adult human NPCs are generally cultured from the two major neurogenic regions of the brain; the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. However, we propose that cells with similar characteristics to NPCs can be isolated and cultured from other regions of the adult human brain. Briefly, human brain cells were isolated from the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) of post-mortem and biopsy tissue and diced into small pieces prior to enzymatic digestion. The dissociated cells were plated onto poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated culture flasks. Initially the cells were maintained in media consisting of 10% serum, DMEM:F12 media supplemented with 2mM glutamine and antibiotics at 5% CO2/37ºC. Once confluent, the cells were re-plated into conditions favourable for NPC growth (serum free Neurobasal medium supplemented with N2, 2mM GlutaMAX® and antibiotics or commercially available STEMPRO® medium (Invitrogen)) in either adherent monolayer cultures or non-adherent surfaces for the formation of spheres. When cells from the MTG were cultured in 10% serum, the dominating cell type that arose after prolonged culture periods were fibroblast-like cells (FbCs), which were highly proliferative and expressed high levels of fibroblast markers. However, when cultured under NPC conditions, FbCs became bipolar in morphology and strongly expressed genes associated with NPCs such as nestin, GFAP and GFAP-δ and βIII-tubulin. These expression patterns partially resembled those seen with adherent adult human NPCs isolated from the SVZ. Furthermore, when FbCs were cultured on non-adhesive surfaces, they formed spherical structures resembling neurospheres formed from adult human SVZ-derived NPCs. When these FbC-spheres were plated onto adhesive surfaces they gave rise to cells expressing immature neuronal markers. Although further investigation is needed, these results suggest that more than one cell type from the adult human brain in vitro possesses stem cell-like properties. The origin of these FbCs is yet to be determined, however, leptomeningeal or blood-born mesenchymal precursor (fibrocytes) origin cannot be excluded. Regardless of their origin, these cells provide further evidence for cellular plasticity and possibly provide an alternative in vitro source of adult neural stem cells.

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