19 results for Conference poster, 2013

  • The development of online learning environments (OLEs) at The University of Auckland Library: collaboration, integration and usability testing

    Zdravkovic, Neda (2013-04-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to meet the learning needs of a large number of in-house, flexible learning and distance-learning students from a variety of disciplines, The University of Auckland Library has enhanced the provision of information and academic literacy instruction through the design of online learning environments. Learning Services Librarians, learning designers and subject librarians from The University of Auckland Library have collaborated with faculty, Centre for Academic Development staff, graphic design professionals and web developers to design online courses and tutorials, such as: • Academic Integrity - stand-alone online academic integrity course, compulsory for all new students at the University of Auckland from Semester I 2013; • COMLAW 101: New Zealand’s Legal Framework - curriculum- integrated information literacy online tutorial designed for COMLAW 101: Law in a Business Environment academic course with 2000 students each year; • POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health - curriculum- integrated online information literacy learning environment for postgraduate students completing the POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health course and compulsory assessment activity bearing 15% course mark; • FTVMS 100: Assignment Research Path – curriculum-integrated information literacy online tutorial and compulsory assessment activity (10% course mark) designed for FTVMS 100: Media studies first year undergraduate course with 1000 students each year; • Understanding Your Reading List - generic information literacy online tutorial designed for all first year undergraduate students. The focus of the paper will be on the development framework of online courses, curriculum-integrated and generic tutorials and the analysis of different stages of each project, their collaborative nature and usability testing practices applied (user observation, focus group interviews, surveys) and outcomes. It will introduce CourseBuilder as a web-based tool for the design of online learning environments and activities, its features, functionalities and published outputs. CourseBuilder, developed by the University of Auckland’s Centre for Academic Development, is an authoring tool that provides customisable templates to develop online interactive activities (eg, case studies, reflections and quizzes), import text, insert media, monitor student responses and more. Finally the paper will describe issues and challenges during each development stage, as well as benefits and limitations of using an online learning environment development system.

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  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • An Architecture for Flexible Problem Solving

    Langley, Patrick; Emery, Miranda; Barley, Michael; Maclellan, C (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The literature on problem solving in both humans and machines has revealed a diverse set of strategies that operate in different manners. In this paper, we review this great variety of techniques and propose a five-stage framework for problem solving that accounts for this variation in terms of differences in strategic knowledge used at each stage. We describe the framework and its implementation in some detail, including its encoding of problems and their solutions, its representation of domain-level and strategy-level knowledge, and its overall operation. We present evidence of the framework’s generality and its ability to support many distinct problem-solving strategies, including one that is novel and interesting. We also report experiments that show the framework’s potential for empirical comparisons of different techniques. We conclude by reviewing other work on flexible approaches to problem solving and considering some directions for future research.

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  • Evidence for the intensive-exposure and cross-sex transmission hypotheses in epidemic poliomyelitis mortality patterns in southern Ontario, 1910–1937

    Battles, Heather (2013-04-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poliomyelitis was a major emerging epidemic disease in the early 20th century, and models of its epidemiology continue to be revised. Nielsen and colleagues have recently presented two new hypotheses: 1) that polio severity is related to intensity of exposure, creating a U-shaped age curve rather than a linear increase in severity with age, and 2) that polio severity increases when transmission occurs between opposite sexes, and therefore the sex ratio in severe polio cases will be more equal when family sizes are larger. Data for polio deaths in Ontario’s Wentworth and York Counties from 1900-1937 were gathered from a variety of archival sources, including birth, marriage, and death registrations and census records, and entered into an Excel database. Analysis of mortality patterns in this sample revealed two distinct stages within the study period, discussed in part here. Stage One (1910 to 1927) is characterized by an equal sex ratio and a median known family size of 4. Stage Two (1928 to 1937) is characterized by excess male deaths and a median known family size of 2. For 1910-1937 inclusive, the sex ratio for ages 0-19 was 2.6 in families of 1-2 children and 0.9 in families of ≥3 children. A U-shaped age curve was observed in the 1928-1937 period, with a dip at ages 7-8, but not in 1910-1927. These results support Nielsen and colleagues’ cross-sex transmission hypothesis and intensive-exposure model, tying polio mortality patterns to demographic shifts in the early 20th century and indicating further research is warranted. This research was supported by funding from SSHRC (Canada Graduate Scholarship), OGS (Ontario Graduate Scholarship), and McMaster University Department of Anthropology.

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Paired catchment research reveals WSUD influences on stream ecosystem condition at average and low residential densities

    van Roon, Marjorie (2013-11-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Water Sensitive Urban Design has much in common with the New Zealand (NZ) practice, Low Impact Urban Design and Development (LIUDD). In New Zealand, both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem protection and re-creation are essential elements of greenfield developments that conform to LIUDD. This paper reports on comparative New Zealand catchment studies over 7 years for conventional and Water Sensitive Urban Design subdivision at low/countryside (2000 – 5000 m2 lots) and average/urban (400 - 500 m2 lots) residential densities. Subdivision, re-vegetation and house construction are now nearing completion. Catchment characteristics are related to the health of in-stream macro-invertebrate communities as indicators of stream and catchment condition. Results for in-stream indicators are compared to region-wide values and show the ecological superiority of WSUD/LIUDD catchments. Indicators of stream ecological health in treatment catchments have improved for two urban streams and up to three countryside residential streams during the subdivision and house construction period contrary to normal expectations for conventional urban development.

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  • Children who learn in more than one language in Aotearoa/New Zealand: New challenges and research processes

    Harvey, Nola; Podmore, Valerie; Hedges, Helen; Keegan, Peter; Mara, D; Lee, Jennifer; Tuafuti, P (2013-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Demographic evidence indicates that learners in Aotearoa-New Zealand are increasingly likely to speak more than one language and that this is most evident in the Auckland region. These trends suggest emerging challenges for researchers and practitioners. This poster presents our TLRI* research, in progress, which documents the diversity of language use and experiences of children in early childhood education and care in the Auckland region. The collaborative research team includes University of Auckland researchers and teacherresearchers in four early childhood centres: a M??ori-medium centre, a Samoan immersion centre, and a kindergarten and a centre with children from a wide range of heritage language backgrounds. Theoretical frameworks influencing the design and analyses include an additive approach to bilingual activity and contexts that views children as potentially capable. The research (2013-2015) addresses three questions: 1. What languages do children from participating ECE centres use in their learning in the centre and at home? 2. What experiences and outcomes for children who learn in more than one language in the early years are valued by parents, teachers, and children? 3. How might the opportunities and challenges for children who learn in more than one language be addressed in educational practice? Objectives within each of the four partner-centre settings are to: ?? document the languages spoken by children, parents, and teachers in the ECE centre and at home ?? document and interpret the learning experiences of young children who learn in more than one language (as valued by parents, teachers, and children) ?? document the valued outcomes for young children who learn in more than one language ?? in partnership between teacher-researchers and University of Auckland researchers, analyse and theorise the data gathered, using funds of knowledge and additive bilingualism approaches, to build on understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language, and ?? analyse and theorise, using an 'additive approach' (to bilingualism, immersion, or multi-literacies), to extend understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language.) Research team members are using a range of qualitative and quantitative approaches to generate data about the experiences, opportunities, and challenges associated with learning in more than one language. Methods/tools include: questionnaires for parents and teachers, focus group interviews with parents and teachers, and fieldnote observations of arrivals and departures at the centres, videotaped observations of children's learning experiences in ECE settings, and conversations with children. In the poster session, aspects of these processes will be discussed. This research is significant, given the demographics and that there are gaps in current knowledge about learning experiences, valued outcomes and possible futures for children who are learning in more than one language in their ECE and (or) their family environments. Our study is designed to contribute new findings and to advance knowledge and practice about children learning in more than one language in the early years.

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  • Palliative Care Experience, Education and Education Needs of Aged Residential Care Clinical Staff

    Frey, RA; Gott, M; Boyd, M; Robinson, J (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users??? perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users??? experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users??? views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users??? perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers??? concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ???expert??? healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • The potential of urban forests to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The urban population in New Zealand is expected to increase significantly over the next years. Urban areas are generally large sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, attempts to quantify atmospheric CO2 concentrations and fluxes have suggested that densily vegetated urban areas may absorb sufficient quantities of anthropogenic CO2 to act as a local sink. Consequently, urban greening programs now form an important part of many urban climate change mitigation policies globally as well as in New Zealand. However, knowledge about the direct contribution of urban vegetation on atmospheric CO2 concentrations is still limited and measurements scarce. This paper examines the methods used to date to estimate / measure carbon pools and CO2 fluxes from urban vegetation and soils (collectively known as urban forests) and aggregates currently available results. Results from the northern hemisphere show that carbon pools in urban forests were comparable to 3 ??? 60% of the annually released fossil fuel emissions, while photosynthetic uptake accounted for 0.3 ??? 2.6% of the total estimated emissions in urban areas. Whilst vegetation did not offset CO2 emissions on an annual basis in these scenarios, vegetative CO2 uptake resulted in significantly lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations in summer. However, the currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods, the limited number of urban areas studied and the temporal / spatial resolution of the fieldwork. This paper demonstrates that in order to effectively quantify and encorporate carbon fluxes from urban areas into annual CO2 budgets, future research needs to use a combination of methodologies and be aware of the scales of their studies. Thus, before investing in urban greening programs the potential of urban vegetation as a climate change mitigation measure needs to be further investigated, particularly for cities in the southern hemisphere.

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  • Using network science to explore innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SH (2013-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We live in a world were scientific and technical advances require increasingly specialised knowledge while drawing expertise from ever more diverse technical areas. In an effort to better understand the relationships between different areas of innovation, and the role of specialisation, diversity and ubiquity in national and regional economies, we have mined several million patent records from the European Patent Office, along with their classification codes, and used them to construct a network of ???patent-space???. Patents provide a rich data set when studying innovation. Networks of scientific publications, such as that in [1], formed from inter-journal citations, illustrate the links between different disciplines as new knowledge is created, while networks of countries and the goods they export, such as the ???product-space??? network in [2], give insight into the economic complexity (or otherwise) and the likely areas of growth for national economies. Using patents allows us to take an intermediate view and investigate the role of science and innovation in economic growth. We take an approach similar to [2], identifying when individual countries or geographic regions have a ???revealed comparative advantage??? with respect to particular technical areas. We have constructed a proximity network as a base-map for the space of patentable innovation. We find that patent-space is heterogeneous and highly structured, and that the structure depends on the size or ???granularity??? of the regions that data is aggregated into. By overlaying data for particular regions on the patent-space base map we are able to explore temporal and regional trends ??? in particular how the innovation systems of different countries has produced quite different areas of specialisation. Figure 1: Patent-space for New Zealand (left) and South Korea (right) - two countries with very different innovation systems. Nodes represent patent classification classes. Nodes are dark when the country has a comparative advantage in that area and faded out otherwise. Nodes are connected if a comparative advantage with respect to one classification tends to occur in conjunction with a connected classification. [1] L. Leydesdorff & I. Rafols, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (2008). [2] C. Hidalgo & R. Hausmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2009).

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  • Sick unto death: Barriers and facilitators to M??ori access to primary care in New Zealand

    Reid, Jennifer (2013-04-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • One size in no way fits all - quantifying hip variations by automatic morphometric measurements from CT

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Malcolm, D; Thomas, CDL; Nielsen, Poul (2013-12-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The femur and hip joint in particular are complicated structures that have both clinical and anthropological significance. The variability of surface structures among individuals especially in terms of gender makes the extraction of consistently reproducible measurements non-trivial and time consuming. Automatic image segmentation and meshing methods allow precisely-defined measurements to be taken from CT-volumes as part of an automated pipeline. We present initial findings from such a pipeline for obtaining morphometric measurements of the hip. We believe that the importance of this work lies in the eventual creation of a comprehensive databank that will be of use in the development of prosthetic devices and the tracking of disease and evolutionary morphometry. A 16-row MDCT was used to acquire images on 55 human cadavers (24 male, 31 female). The outer femoral surface was automatically segmented and meshed with sub-voxel accuracy. Femoral head area, femoral axis length, neck angle, neck width, and subtrochanteric width were automatically measured on the mesh according to mathematical definitions based on mesh geometry. Errors with respect to manual measurements were between 2.4% and 7.6% on average. All automatic measurements except for neck angle showed significant differences between genders (p-value<0.001), which was reflected in the manual measurements. We present this initial evaluation of five measurements with a view toward the creation of a macro-structural atlas of bones in the hip. The automated system shows good promise in terms of accuracy and sensitivity compared to manual measurements. We describe the variability of these measurements in our homogenous population with specific reference to gender to provide an overview of what is possible using current technology. Automatic assessment of proximal femur morphometry has shown that variations are sufficient to warrant the creation of a bank of detailed morphometric assessments of the hip. We believe that detailed knowledge of this complicated structure may be used to support the development of prosthetic devices and assist in diagnosing complex hip-based disorders.

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, AK; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • C/EBP?? Expression in Primary Human Glial Cells

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Smith, AM; Park, In; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael (2013-08-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Polyamine diamide orthidine F as a potent and selective antimalarial lead compound

    Liew, Lydia; Kaiser, M; Copp, B (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    THE POLYAMINE DIAMIDE ORTHIDINE F AS A POTENT AND SELECTIVE ANTIMALARIAL LEAD COMPOUND Orthidine F (1) was isolated from an extract of the marine organism Aplidium orthium, found at Three Kings Islands, New Zealand.1 An initial screen of the natural product 1 against a panel of parasitic protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum K1 dual drug-resistant strain) identified selective inhibitory activity for T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 78 ??M) against T. cruzi, no detectable activity towards L. donovani and moderate activity against P. falciparum. Furthermore, the natural product was found to be non-toxic in the non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, thus representing an attractive target as an antiparasitic drug. A preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study identified analogues with a similar activity profile to the natural product. The analogues were found to exhibit moderate inhibitory activity against T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 3.2???210 ??M), more potent inhibitory activity against P. falciparum (IC50 0.0086???0.61 ??M), and no significant activity against T. cruzi and L. donovani. The analogues also continued to display little or no cytotoxic effect in the L6 cell line, this combined with the potent IC50 values obtained for inhibition of P. falciparum afforded a series of analogues with impressive properties which warranted further studies. This led to a second series of analogues with the intention of improving its antimalarial activity. The analogues generated from this exercise exhibited potent in vitro activities (IC50 0.0086???0.61 ??M) while retaining selectivity against P. falciparum. Three analogues were selected based on the in vitro data obtained and evaluated for in vivo activity in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model of malaria; which in this instance did not yield significant activity.

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